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  1. #21
    Poop Loops's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    How could I? I didn't learn how to write until I was in the 6th grade! :D

    PL

  2. #22
    Moleculo's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Poop-Loops
    How could I? I didn't learn how to write until I was in the 6th grade! :D

    PL
    You would draw little illustrations in the dirt like Heraldo.

  3. #23
    Moleculo's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Seriously though, capturing the intricacies of compound movements between opponents on paper seems a bit beyond the capabilities of your average UFC goon.

  4. #24

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    sydney, australia
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i've just been thinking about taking notes on my groundwork performance, seeing what moves i got tapped out on, what moves i tapped people out with, i think that would highlight what needs to improve after a few weeks

  5. #25

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    Apr 2005
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    686
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've found it useful to simply write down stuff that works well in sparring. Its quite informative when you analyse it and then focus your training program into refining those techniques and perhaps extending them into more complex sequences.

    Dunno about writing down lots of stuff in a training session, seems like thatd be better time to use working-hard. I tend to do this kind of stuff when I've done all the training I'm gonna do.

  6. #26
    jnp's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    1. Taking notes is extra work. Most people don't like extra work, I know I don't.

    2. Taking notes will not work for some people, but it will work for most people.

    I personally cannot draw my way out of a paper bag. As a part time note taker I have learned a shorthand that over time I have begged, borrowed or stolen from my fellow scribblers.You learn what works best for you.

    As a tactile learner, I also was initially skeptical about taking notes. I will say that my retention level is significantly higher when I take notes, and I can review the notes now or years later if necessary.

    Originally posted by Edge
    Exactly. It would be pretty sad to see someone just sitting there during classtime writing notes.
    There are usually several students taking notes in class as our instructor encourages it.
    Last edited by jnp; 5/24/2005 10:06am at .

  7. #27

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i have started attempting to take notes, i find it REALLY hard to put what i want to say into words
    eg i had just passed the gaurd of a guy that i very rarely pass, my notes ended up something like this "arm went here, then my balance was here then this happened then this happened, and i was past his gaurd" simply put, most of my notes are incoherent and will make no sense to me if i ever try to read them again

    suggestions? tips?

  8. #28
    paper-samurai's Avatar
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    netherlands
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    131
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i simply replay the lesson in my head,just visualize youreself from a thirdperson perspective and rethink everything you did..I sometimes draw the technices i did,but its imposible for me to discribe them,like mentioned earlyer..how would you discribe a omoplata?

    I think it wil only work if you know all the names and wright it in BJJ terms.
    "i went from guard to highguard,tryd an armbare failed but was able to go to the mount,he roled me over,back to guard,opent guard,made a traingle"

  9. #29
    fanatical's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't learn much from taking notes when I get instructed in anything, but I find that keeping a training log is helpful. What I do, is I write down what I remember immediately after I get home. I find I remember and learn better if I write down what I have in my short term memory. It simply helps me retain the information.

    It actually didn't start out as a training log. It started out as just ranting to my friends about what we were doing at the jyoojitsoo place, and ended up being a training log as I read other logs and figured that a lot of that wasn't so different from what I was doing. Different logs show different personalities though and different perspectives and goals. Mine reflects a rather technical view. Being interested in the details and going a little indepth on techniques and how I feel I perform them. Some choose to write down a purely factual review of what their training consisted of. Some simply keep a log of their repetitions and exercises. I find it to be a great help. I do much of what paper-samurai describes. But from any views I can imagine. Often trying to make what I'm thinking clear for someone who wasn't there (due to the fact it started out as explanations to friends). That also helps me when I go back later and read it.

    In later times I've started seeing how my writing has changed and how I may have said daft things only a year ago, which I now understand better and that makes for motivation in some ways. Only thing that can prevent me writing a log, is that it takes a little time. It will take up half an hour at least of my day, but I find that time to be well spent as I'm pretty obsessed with learning anyway.

    At any rate, we learn better from what we like doing. A log is just a written reflection of what a lot of people usually think, and it helps them review training. If you really really really hate it, then it won't help you in any way. Interest helps more than any training aid.

    I'm ranting and writing down whatever I think on the subject, as I do in my log :)
    More human than human is our motto.

  10. #30

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    266
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Ronin
    To echo the great Frank Dux:
    MA are for fighters, not for people that write journals.
    I have to disagree, I think MA are for anyone with the will to learn them and the dedication to continue their training. If it helps you improve, I'm all for it. If you don't like it and see it as hindering your training, cut it out. I think that a common misconception in the West is that MA are for cutthroat brutes with nothing better to do than pick fights. I can't speak for anyone else, but my drive to improve my body is primarily for self-defense and the defense of my loved ones.

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