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  1. AthleticGirl is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/05/2005 11:16am


     Style: Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Girl

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by samurai_steve
    I dunno what he's talking about. I use SPRI rubber resistance products and 32oz weighted gloves from Everlast. I see it akin to putting a "donut" on a baseball bat and mimicking the movements of competition with resistance, so that when the resistance is removed, the natural speed and power is greater.
    Unfortunately it doesn't work that way, the added resistance changes the movement patterns enough that there is no carryover in speed/power or anything else.
  2. BSDaemon is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/05/2005 12:50pm

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     Style: BJJ/MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This is a bit skewed - MA is done for the purpose of learning to perform and apply MA technique. You aren't doing yoga for the purpose of learning to perform and apply yoga technique (unless you do competitive yoga).
    Sure I am... My knowledge and physique have a long way to go before Iíll be able to execute the more advanced poses... so I am learning to perform. And I intend to apply yoga techniques to benefit flexibility, strength, range of motion, and cardio along with an advanced form of meditation.

    By having a background in physics and physiology, it is very easy to analyze ANY human movement in terms of the mechanical and metabolic aspects.
    I donít see how you can attempt to analyze something you havenít personally experienced. I mean I suppose you could find books with some poses and start doing free body diagrams and calculating forces for all of the parts of your body. I have a background in physics as well, so Iím constantly thinking about mechanics while of while holding a yoga pose. Torque, leverage, friction, all become variables you can manipulate with your body. Sure I could have my nose buried in books or doing calculations on paper... But Iíd rather ponder these things on the mat.


    I'm not suggesting people sit around doing nothing. I'm saying one should pick and design general fitness training such that the minimum amount of time is required to achieve desired results.
    Here is some pseudoscience for you:

    What Iím trying to say, Is that your rate of progress is primarily ďlinearly dependantĒ upon amount of effort you put into it, up until a point at which your progress falls off due to overtraining. Now I know that you hate generalities, but you could brake down ďtrainĒ into all of the components that make it up. . The level of the thresholds and curvature of the graphs would be different, but each activity would have a similar kind of function of benefit in terms of excursion. The point Iím trying to make is that you could maximize the benefit from one specific activity, but still have a ways to go before reaching the maximum of your total physical potential. And in that case, other different activities should be looked to in order to complete a training routine.

    I think itís counterproductive to over-analyze this stuff too much. Itís more important to listen to your body's intuition, to feel what your limits are, and to strive to expand them.
    Last edited by BSDaemon; 5/05/2005 12:53pm at .
  3. Ronin is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/05/2005 12:55pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Shi Ja Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I hate you guys.
  4. Mediocrates is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/05/2005 2:13pm


     Style: Fabio Santos BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I give up.
  5. Jekyll is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/05/2005 6:12pm

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     Style: San shou(tai chi) +judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mediocrates
    I give up.
    You know you are genuinely one of the most infuriating posters on bullshido.

    Keep It Simple Stupid.

    Bud shi dist is trying out yoga to see if it helps with his flexability, it has been recomended by many MMA/BJJ people and he thinks it is worth investigating further.

    Now if you have a problem with this, then post why you think that.

    It takes too long and isnt effective enough for you? Tell us of a more effective alternative. No one wants to hear "If chuck liddell jumped off a cliff, would you do it?"

    You obviously have a huge amount of knowledge about personal fitness but the way you present it leaves a lot to be desired.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stickx
    It must suck for legit practitioners of tai chi like Cullion to see their art get all watered down into exercise for seniors.
    Those who esteme qi have no strength. ~ Exposition of Insights into the Thirteen Postures Attrib: Wu Yuxiang founder of Wu style tai chi.
  6. Jekyll is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/05/2005 6:21pm

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     Style: San shou(tai chi) +judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by AthleticGirl
    Unfortunately it doesn't work that way, the added resistance changes the movement patterns enough that there is no carryover in speed/power or anything else.
    ^^^Not a striker.

    Having said that punching/swinging with weights does make your hands faster....

    ....but only for a couple of minutes afterwards until your neromuscular system re-adjusts to the change in weight. That's why baseball players warm up with the donut before going out onto the pitch.

    I know sod all about the resistive bands, but if it strengthens the muscles you punch with it will make you hit harder and possibly faster. There will also be a tempory effect from using them as discribed above.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stickx
    It must suck for legit practitioners of tai chi like Cullion to see their art get all watered down into exercise for seniors.
    Those who esteme qi have no strength. ~ Exposition of Insights into the Thirteen Postures Attrib: Wu Yuxiang founder of Wu style tai chi.
  7. AthleticGirl is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/05/2005 7:21pm


     Style: Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Girl

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Show me one peer reviewed article that proves this. Just one.
  8. Macistani is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/05/2005 8:45pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Dear AthleticGirl,
    I may be a bit of noob when it comes to fitness, but it seems like you're full of ****.
    More muscle = stronger arms = harder hits. It isn't the only factor, but I'm fairly certain that heavyweights hit harder than featherweights, and it ain't because they're taller.
  9. AthleticGirl is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/05/2005 10:39pm


     Style: Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Girl

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm not arguing that bigger fighters hit harder than smaller fighters, I'm arguing the suggested method, which is well known not to work.

    P.S. The arms contribute very, very little to punching power.
  10. BSDaemon is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/05/2005 10:47pm

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     Style: BJJ/MT

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Training to yoga respiration selectively increases respiratory sensation in healthy man.
    Villien F, Yu M, Barthelemy P, Jammes Y.
    Laboratoire de Physiopathologie Respiratoire (EA 2201), Institut Jean Roche, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de la Mediterranee, F-13916 Marseille Cedex 20, France.

    Because yoga practitioners think they are benefiting from their breath training we hypothesized that yoga respiration training (YRT) could modify the respiratory sensation. Yoga respiration (YR) ("ujjai") consisted of very slow, deep breaths (2-3 min(-1)) with sustained breath-hold after each inspiration and expiration. At inclusion in the study and after a 2-month YRT program, we determined in healthy subjects their eupneic ventilatory pattern and their capacity to discriminate external inspiratory resistive loads (respiratory sensation), digital tactile mechanical pressures (somesthetic sensation) and sound-pressure stimulations (auditory sensation). Data were compared to a gender-, age-, and weight-matched control group of healthy subjects who did not undergo the YRT program but were explored at the same epochs. After the 2-month YRT program, the respiratory sensation increased. Thus, both the exponent of the Steven's power law (Psi=kPhin) and the slope of the linear-linear plot between Psi and mouth pressure (Pm) were significantly higher, and the intercept with ordinate axis of the Psi versus Pm relationship was lower. After YRT, the peak Pm developed against inspiratory loads was significantly lower, reducing the load-induced activation of respiratory afferents. YRT induced long-lasting modifications of the ventilatory pattern with a significant lengthening of expiratory duration and a modest tidal volume increase. No significant changes in somesthetic and auditory sensations were noted. In the control group, the respiratory sensation was not modified during a 15-min period of yoga respiration, despite the peak Pm changes in response to added loads were then significantly reduced. These data suggest that training to yoga respiration selectively increases the respiratory sensation, perhaps through its persistent conditioning of the breathing pattern.

    Effects of Hatha yoga and Omkar meditation on cardiorespiratory performance, psychologic profile, and melatonin secretion.
    Harinath K, Malhotra AS, Pal K, Prasad R, Kumar R, Kain TC, Rai L, Sawhney RC.
    Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Timarpur, Delhi, India.
    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate effects of Hatha yoga and Omkar meditation on cardiorespiratory performance, psychologic profile, and melatonin secretion. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Thirty healthy men in the age group of 25-35 years volunteered for the study. They were randomly divided in two groups of 15 each. Group 1 subjects served as controls and performed body flexibility exercises for 40 minutes and slow running for 20 minutes during morning hours and played games for 60 minutes during evening hours daily for 3 months. Group 2 subjects practiced selected yogic asanas (postures) for 45 minutes and pranayama for 15 minutes during the morning, whereas during the evening hours these subjects performed preparatory yogic postures for 15 minutes, pranayama for 15 minutes, and meditation for 30 minutes daily, for 3 months. Orthostatic tolerance, heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, dynamic lung function (such as forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced expiratory volume percentage, peak expiratory flow rate, and maximum voluntary ventilation), and psychologic profile were measured before and after 3 months of yogic practices. Serial blood samples were drawn at various time intervals to study effects of these yogic practices and Omkar meditation on melatonin levels. RESULTS: Yogic practices for 3 months resulted in an improvement in cardiorespiratory performance and psychologic profile. The plasma melatonin also showed an increase after three months of yogic practices. The systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and orthostatic tolerance did not show any significant correlation with plasma melatonin. However, the maximum night time melatonin levels in yoga group showed a significant correlation (r = 0.71, p < 0.05) with well-being score. CONCLUSION: These observations suggest that yogic practices can be used as psychophysiologic stimuli to increase endogenous secretion of melatonin, which, in turn, might be responsible for improved sense of well-being.
    The effects of yoga training and a single bout of yoga on delayed onset muscle soreness in the lower extremity.
    Boyle CA, Sayers SP, Jensen BE, Headley SA, Manos TM.
    Department of Exercise Science and Sports Studies, Springfield College Allied Health Sciences Complex, Springfield, MA 01109, USA.
    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of yoga training and a single bout of yoga on the intensity of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). 24 yoga-trained (YT; n = 12) and non-yoga-trained (CON; n = 12), matched women volunteers were administered a DOMS-inducing bench-stepping exercise. Muscle soreness was assessed at baseline, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after bench-stepping using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Groups were also compared on body awareness (BA), flexibility using the sit-and-reach test (SR), and perceived exertion (RPE). Statistical significance was accepted at p </= 0.05. A 2 x 2 mixed factorial ANOVA with repeated measures at 24 and 48 hours revealed a significant (p < 0.05) group main effect with VAS scores greater for CON than YT. Paired t-tests revealed that in YT, VAS scores were higher before yoga class than after yoga class at 24 hours (21.4 [+/- 6.9] mm vs. 11.1 [+/- 4.1] mm; p = 0.02). The SR was greater in YT than in CON (65.0 [+/- 7.9] cm vs. 33.3 [+/- 7.0] cm; p < 0.01); however, no differences were found between yoga and control in BA (94.0 [+/- 4.4] units vs. 83.8 [+/- 3.7] units; p = 0.21) or in RPE at 5-minute intervals (2.9 [+/- 0.3], 5.3 [+/- 0.8], 5.8 [+/- 0.9], and 5.2 [+/- 0.8] vs. 2.5 [+/- 0.3], 4.0 [+/- 0.5], 4.2 [+/- 0.3], and 4.9 [+/- 0.4]. Yoga training and a single bout of yoga appear to attenuate peak muscle soreness in women following a bout of eccentric exercise. These findings have significant implications for coaches, athletes, and the exercising public who may want to implement yoga training as a preseason regimen or supplemental activity to lessen the symptoms associated with muscle soreness.
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