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  1. samantha711 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/11/2002 5:19pm


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    working from the clinch, knees, elbows...thigh kicks...you should be able to tell...If it looks like they are training people to fight like V. Silva, should be a good place..lol

    <img src=icon_smile_blackeye.gif border=0 align=middle> Sam
  2. 9chambers

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    Posted On:
    8/11/2002 7:03pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Muay Thai training should consist of working the two main kicks on a long bag that hangs low so
    you can do low kicks - or another suitable target. Then do some bag work throwing punches and elbows. Then mix it up a little.

    Then you and a partner should practice some kicking and guarding wearing pads. Then maybe some elbow and punch combonations to hand held targets.

    Then you should do some sparring in the ring. Muay Thai is a sport like boxing. You could go at it just like in competition but most likely you will wear some padding and gear to keep from the wear and tear that would happen from going all-out every other day.

    You can get seriously hurt in a real Muay Thai match. Competition is fierce.

    You should learn to use both lead and rear leg kicks. Lead leg kicks are mainly for defense and the rear leg kicks are for offense.


    my kung fu eeeeeees better than yours!
  3. 10FingersOfDeath is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/12/2002 1:30am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thai Boxing is cool. It's definitely one of the better striking arts out there. Another I'd reccomend and I'm sure I'll get flack for this is Wing Chun.
    It really is a good solid striking style. It has a really solid doctrine, and IMO is excellent for grapplers b/c of the Chi Sau practice. I like the aspect of being able to stick with your opponent if you're looking for an opening for a take down.

    I think the biggest offender in making it look bad are the "Masters" themselves. These guys are a joke, I truly wish Yip Man was still alive. BTW, I know that everyone busts on it b/c it's deadly finger jabs but hey seriously since when is knowing how to throw a finger jab a bad thing?
  4. ThaiBoxer is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/12/2002 1:57am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    yeh...i went to check out the class....they where doing all of what u said 9chambers...2 practiced on the bag, and the other four where partnerd up...they had this time clock to let them know when to switch...the teacher was also doing practicing as wel...he would stop sometimes to see how the students were doing and i could also see him looking out the corner of his eye...when they partnerd they took turns kickin, jabbin, and punchig hand bags...i didnt stay long enuff to see if they were sparring.....
  5. samantha711 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/12/2002 2:10am


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    10fingers,
    We use Wing Chun as a warm up, I love the the drills...as I was saying in another thread, I feel WC has helped me alot...but, Yikes when I think back to when I started WC, with all the sensitivity drills, I was slow & so clumsy my partner would look at me like "what is your malfunction??" I had to really learn to relax

    <img src=icon_smile_blackeye.gif border=0 align=middle> Sam
  6. 9chambers

    Guest

    Posted On:
    8/12/2002 2:34am


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ip Chun has a little book out now that can teach the basic concepts to someone just getting interested. *shrug*

    my kung fu eeeeeees better than yours!
  7. Sheol is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/15/2002 7:01am


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Muay Thai is a sport. A GREAT sport, but a sport nonetheless. Just like sport boxing and sport savate (Boxe Francaise), it teaches a lot of good strikes and builds physical attributes. HOWEVER, don't stop with what the sport has to offer. Continue looking at other arts as you grow.
  8. Gezere is offline
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    My guns bigger than Scrapper's!

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    Posted On:
    8/15/2002 7:20am

    supporting member
     Style: Kakutogi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sheol,

    You are missing something. All that you mentioned, MT, Boxing, and especially Savate. ALL derived from FIGHITING arts. They later became more sport oriented but they all were fighting arts.

    Boxing was derived from Greece and was talk to footsoldiers and Gladiators. Leather tong wraps were used for practice and in the arena.

    La Boxe Francaise is the SPORT, Savate, formerly Chauson, was the fighting art that has its roots in Basque culture. The the terms are interchangeable today. I used to train Savate in Metz, France up until about a year ago, job got in the way.

    Muay Thai is said to be taught to footsoldiers way before it became a national sport.

    Xiao Ao Jiang Hu Zhi Dong Fang Bu Bai (Laughing Proud Warrior Invinsible Asia) Emporer of Baji!!! THE FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE AGAINST THE UNITED AUSSIE FRONT!!
    ______
    Xiao Ao Jiang Hu Zhi Dong Fang Bu Bai (Laughing Proud Warrior Invincible Asia) Dark Emperor of Baji!!!

    RIP SOLDIER

    Didn't anyone ever tell him a fat man could never be a ninja
    -Gene, GODHAND

    You can't practice Judo just to win a Judo Match! You practice so that no matter what happens, you can win using Judo!
    The key to fighting two men at once is to be much tougher than both of them.
    -Daniel Tosh
  9. Deaddale is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/15/2002 8:24am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hey Thaiboxer,
    Where is St. Louis do you go to class at? I've been looking for awhile and haven't been able to find anything. Also, if your looking for a good grappling\submission place, Vahgi's martial arts in South county is great. Teaches BJJ.....Thanks
  10. Sheol is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/15/2002 8:41am


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Actually, I didn't miss anything. I referred to the sport versions of the martial arts.

    Western boxing or pugilism has a 'chain' of England & Spain, from Italy (Roman Empire), from Greece (Greek city-states), from Persia (Hittites), from Sumeria (Babylonian Empire). Since virtually all people have had some form of closed-fist fighting, boxing was easily accepted by every culture.

    Boxe Francaise was created when Charles Lecoure merged English boxing with French savate after an indecisive sporting match with Owen Swift. Savate was a codification of existing fighting techniques used in France. Chausson co-existed with savate and it was simply the codification of the fighting techniques of French sailors. To say that either comes from each other is plain silly. Zipota, which predates savate and chausson, was codified sometime in the 1600's. All three share simple techniques and exact same principles, yet there is no mention of zipota by French savate or Chausson texts. The answer is simple. The techniques used by Savate, Chausson, and Zipota, predate the development of the Basque and originate from the Mediterranean and Fertile Crescent cultures. If you look at Greek art depicting pankration, you will notice that the prevalent kick used for poses is recognizable as the chasse. Further, the on-guard hand positions in pankration greatly resembles those used in savate and zipota, prior to Boxe Francaise. To add more fuel, the salute is almost identical!

    The absolutely silly thing is that Western boxing, wrestling, and kickboxing are all from the same art: pancrase (?), which is the Roman version of Greek pankration. Each one was originally a SPORT derived from the combative art of Pankration (which has its own roots). If you look at the Greek Olympics, you see that all three were events. Records from the time-period set out rules that imposed restrictions on each event... event names that eventually became the name of the sporting arts! Otherwise, you don't see them mentioned as anything else except in connection with sport. Pankration is really the only thing that is mentioned in regard with combat, but given that it was originally considered to be a 'family' art, it reasonable to conclude that the term "pankration" is actually just a name for an event, as well. "Pankration" was the means by which a previously unnamed 'system' of fighting was given a name. So, boxing, lutte, savate/chausson/zipota came from pankration which was the first no-holds-bar Olympic event (15th Olympiad). Strange stuff indeed!

    Muay Thai is relatively modern art. Krabi Krabong is the Thai art that predates it and it was Krabi Krabong that was the military art. MT was created with Western kickboxing influence (Boxe Francaise) and Krabi Krabong techniques. It is primarily a sport, albeit a very effective one (as is Boxe Francaise).

    Nice to meet another savateur! I train with the Danse de Rue folks here in Texas, under Maitre Paturel and Professeur Buitron.
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