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  1. ElDuderino is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2003 8:07am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    one of the major differences between different schools/lineages is in the foot work i.e. turning and weight distribution. What method do any of you use or find most effective? I personnally turn on my heels, and always try to maintain a 50/50 weight distribution.
  2. Stold2 is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2003 8:16am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I find that 50/50 is indeed best, but the main problem with any kind of WC/WT/VT lineage footwork is that a lot of practitioners stand flatfooted. Try that against a boxer and he'll just pick you apart piece by piece.
  3. bncwd is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2003 11:30am


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In EBMAS WT (and I guess also in Leung Ting WT) the weight is 100% on the rear leg.

    I don't know if this is the most effective, but I think that the advantages WT gives (really quick way to attack, control, turning once in clinch distance) come from this kind of weight distribution.

    Having weight on the front leg seems to me to nullify most of the advantages, and in that regards I would switch to a MT/Boxing stance.
  4. Fighty McGee is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2003 11:30am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Traditionally, my old WC school (Yip Man lineage) prefered fighting from a side stance, 30% weight on the front foot, 70% on the rear (estimated). The stance is held, in both side stance and goat(horse)stance, with the weight on the ball of the foot. Turning uses the ball and the heel alternately on both feet depending on the direction of the turn (in or out of the line of the stance). I have modified this in my own stance to one much more like a boxing stance (having trained in Muay Thai), toes only slightly inward, side stance, with a 45%front/55%back weight distribution (approx.), dropping into a lower stance as necessary for technique/defense. I found it necessary to modify my stance to allow for better mobility and faster transition to other stances, and to allow for greater access to kicking techniques.
  5. Fighty McGee is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2003 11:36am


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Keeping 100% on your rear leg seems silly. Really that is ONE part of a defensive posture, like a cat stance in Karate... gotta put weight on that front leg at some point.
  6. matzahbal is offline
    matzahbal's Avatar

    Fig Newtons are fruit and cake, suckah.

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2003 11:37am

    supporting member
     Style: Buffalo Wing Chun

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The school I study under is of Ip Ching lineage and our foot work is like bncwd's school. 100% on the rear leg and of course 50/50 in the horse stance.

    bncwd, also some of the advantage's of this is it stops the front leg from getting sweeped since there is no wait on it and quicker reaction to kicks from the opponent since one wouldn't have to shift their weight to throw a ton gerk (sp?)

    "But some apes they gotta go, so we kill the ones we don't know" - 'Ape shall never kill Ape' by The Vandals
    Apu: "Oh! You have just been Apu'd!"
  7. pst is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2003 2:22pm


     Style: WC, etc.

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I like the 50/50, but I find myself using a 70/30 a lot.

    pst
  8. LeungJan is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2003 4:14pm


     Style: Wing Chun

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh dear.
  9. dbulmer is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2003 5:00pm


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Bncwd,
    In WT plus many offshoots back leg is generally 100%/0. Main reason for 100% is ability to kick quickly without telegraphing ie you can tell some kicks are coming by the bad guy shifting weight, move forward quickly from an abducted stance (hard to do and looks silly ! :) ) and without weight on the front leg it makes it a lot more difficult for someone to leg sweep.

    Turning is performed by sinking back on the rear leg and turning the whole of the forward foot - we don't pivot on the heel or ball of the foot. It's hard to do but that's what we train.

    The experienced WC guy doesn't worry too much about the percentages coz they are able and experienced enought to have a good root ie typically the centre of gravity is low and they are comfortable in it.
  10. PizDoff is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/05/2003 7:31pm

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "Traditionally, my old WC school (Yip Man lineage) prefered fighting from a side stance, 30% weight on the front foot, 70% on the rear (estimated). "

    same, though in sparring i find i can move faster myself with the forawrd facing stance 50/50, btw i'm not flat footed

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