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  1. PoleFighter is offline

    Professional Swede

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    Posted On:
    4/10/2005 4:16am


     Style: Sandbagged BJJ white belt

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    I competed in BJJ for the first time yesterday

    I lost my first match in the -85kg weightclass to a danish guy. He immediately went for a single leg. I sprawled on it and tried to break his grip by pushing my hips out. Somehow he managed to get a good angle and and got the takedown. I rolled over and tried to put him in my guard, but he had already passed, so I gave him my back. He got the hooks in immedeatly and started working a choke. I started working an escape by dislodging one of his feet. Then I realized I had grabbed the wrong foot, and that turning would only tighten the choke. I started working the other foot, but by that time the choke was already so tight that I had to tap. I was thoroughly dominated by a much better BJJ:er who in the end won the weightclass without much trouble.

    My second match was in the open class. I faced the guy who had come in third in the -79kg class after losing to the guy who won the finals. I was determined to put in a better performance this time. The match was extremely intense and is something of a blur in my memory. I remember him jumping guard, and me almost passing (I had him rolled up in a little ball with his feet over his head. Ha had amazing flexibility), yet he somehow got me back in the guard and put me in a triangle that I got out of. I also remember being on my back and putting him back in my guard from my half guard and sweeping him. I also remember being restarded standing an single legging him, and escaping a second triangle. Before the decision my opponent ran up to me and gave me huge hug and thanked me for what he thought was a great fight.

    In the end he won on points or advantage. Most people said it was really close though and gave me props for a good performance against a relly good white belt on his own turf.

    What struck me most about competing was how much more intense it was than rolling in the dojo. It was much more different than I had anticipated. All in all I'm happy with my performance, and had a lot of fun. I realized I have a couple of things that I need to work on, especially when it comes to what I'm supposed to do after a sprawl. I'm definitly competing again at the next opportunity.
    I pointed at him [the panhandler], bringing my rear hand up in a subtle approximation of the double Wu Sau guard that is the default hand position in Wing Chun Kung Fu.

    "Step away," I hissed.
    -Phil Elmore
  2. AFS is offline

    Judo Instructor

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    Posted On:
    4/10/2005 4:24am

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     Style: judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well done mate !
    I bet despite fighting 'only' two fights you are sore all over.
    That's what the adrenalin and the intensity of real fighting does to you.
    And no training whatsoever is as hard as the real thing.
    Competition experience is so important. Make sure you keep on fighting !
  3. PoleFighter is offline

    Professional Swede

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    Posted On:
    4/10/2005 6:21am


     Style: Sandbagged BJJ white belt

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by AFS
    Well done mate !
    I bet despite fighting 'only' two fights you are sore all over.
    That's what the adrenalin and the intensity of real fighting does to you.
    And no training whatsoever is as hard as the real thing.
    Competition experience is so important. Make sure you keep on fighting !
    Yeah, my neck hurts a little after those triangles.

    The adrenaline rush was pretty awesome, I must say...
    I pointed at him [the panhandler], bringing my rear hand up in a subtle approximation of the double Wu Sau guard that is the default hand position in Wing Chun Kung Fu.

    "Step away," I hissed.
    -Phil Elmore
  4. MrMcFu is offline

    Badness will not be rewarded

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    Posted On:
    4/10/2005 7:25am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Way to get out and compete!
  5. Traditional Tom is offline
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    [This space for rent]

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    Posted On:
    4/10/2005 10:48am

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     Style: Mixed Martial Arts

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Congratulations on competing, you should have an idea of what you did wrong, and what you have to do to kick their asses next time.
    Any pictures/video forthcoming?
  6. PoleFighter is offline

    Professional Swede

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    Posted On:
    4/10/2005 10:51am


     Style: Sandbagged BJJ white belt

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ^^ I don't think so. Definitly no video though.
    I pointed at him [the panhandler], bringing my rear hand up in a subtle approximation of the double Wu Sau guard that is the default hand position in Wing Chun Kung Fu.

    "Step away," I hissed.
    -Phil Elmore
  7. JKDChick is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/10/2005 5:39pm

    staff
     Style: JKD, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Nice work, man. It gets better. More fun.
    Monkey Ninjas! Attack!
  8. Yrkoon9 is offline
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    Brock Sampson

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    Posted On:
    4/10/2005 11:20pm

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     Style: 5.56

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm going to be a little critical here. Don't take it personal. This is just some advice by someone who has made all of the mistakes you have, and many more. I just want to make sure you recognize them, so you can fix them for next time.

    Quote Originally Posted by PoleFighter
    He immediately went for a single leg. I sprawled on it and tried to break his grip by pushing my hips out. Somehow he managed to get a good angle and and got the takedown.
    There is a moment when you get caught in the single and there is no sprawling out. You have a lot of options. I will give you three, others can throw out more. But by focusing on 3 it might save you.

    A) Never give the OTHER guy the initiative. This is where Judo shines. The minute the match starts you go looking for the takedown. The OTHER guy needs to be on defense. The whole time. Because you are ATTACK ATTACK ATTACK~

    B) When someone latches onto your leg for a single, make sure you crossface the **** out of them. Forearm bone across eye orbital and under nose. Make space and give them pain. Many times they will let go. Or you get enough space to snag a guillotine.

    C) If it looks like you are going down (there is a moment where you KNOW your ass is going down) GIVE him the single leg. Most likely he will put your leg between his, especially in the white belt divisions. Advanced divisions will be trying to clear it even before they hit the ground. Anyways, put the leg between his, reach over his back and grab his belt. Now take his driving momentum and roll him over the top of you. To do this you gotta pull that belt and kick with the trapped leg. This is a reversal and should be worth a 2pt takedown for YOU. The other guy might get 2 also, depending on the judge. But at least you aren't behind on points now. If everything fails, you have kept your leg inside his and fall back to half guard. Time to work, but at least he didnt pass completely.

    I rolled over and tried to put him in my guard, but he had already passed, so I gave him my back.
    Opps. If they pass they get 3. If you roll over and give the back you lose another 4.

    A BETTER strategy when someone is passing is getting to all fours and then putting them BACK in guard. You don't really lose points here and can recover nicely. Some guys games are entirely based on this strategy.

    A good drill for this is:

    A) Hip escape
    B) Immediately get to all fours.
    C) Slip your knee under you and go back to guard.

    That manuver is done all in one motion, in a large circle. It is excellent for stopping passes. Sometimes you get a nice hook back in the guard for a sweep. Sometimes you can take him down by driving forward when you get to all fours (2pt sweep). Sometimes you can get double underhooks as you recover guard and swing back under to take the back.

    As a blue belt this was extremely successfull for me. However, as it is a common strategy, purples are very familar with it and devised means to stop it. I still recommend it for white/blue fundamentals.


    He got the hooks in immedeatly and started working a choke. I started working an escape by dislodging one of his feet. Then I realized I had grabbed the wrong foot, and that turning would only tighten the choke. I started working the other foot, but by that time the choke was already so tight that I had to tap.
    First things first when someone gets your back you need to roll them so you are BOTH facing the sky. Then you push back into them protecting your neck. Once you have them flat, and your neck is protected you are okay. They are now carrying your weight. You want to slide off them to the correct side (determined by which arm is trying to choke) and keep them flat. Then you want to roll into them, thus putting yourself in their guard. Removing a foot is a good plan, but putting them flat and rolling into their guard is of more importance, and you can get into their guard without removing a foot oftentimes.

    I say this because it SOUNDS like you were on all 4 fours or sitting while trying to remove a foot and got choked out. Better to defend the neck and try to slide them than get choked out. At worst you slide them, and they bail and take mount. Again, bad - but still better than getting choked out.

    I was thoroughly dominated by a much better BJJ:er who in the end won the weightclass without much trouble.
    No shame at all. We have all been there. The only way to beat someone who is better than you is to get better. And getting beated by someone who is better is the best motivation to train harder.

    What would suck is if you beat yourself. For instance the thing that makes me sick is people who go to compete who are not ready, and end up screwing themselves. Like...not being in shape and gassing out, not able to give a good performance and losing. Or being really stupid in the competion, trying stupid **** they saw on a videotape the night before, etc. In THAT case, you beat yourself and you need a kick to the nuts. Doesn't sound like that happened to you though.

    The match was extremely intense and is something of a blur in my memory.
    Most matches are like that. That is why I videotape everything. Keep this in mind to get better. Watch the tape 100X.


    I remember him jumping guard, and me almost passing (I had him rolled up in a little ball with his feet over his head. Ha had amazing flexibility), yet he somehow got me back in the guard and put me in a triangle that I got out of.
    A trap. A flexible persons trap. They let you stack to pass, roll into this fucked up bent over ****. You get aggressive thinking you have them, and go for it. They keep one arm, and walk their shoulder back while popping their hips up to triangle you. If you are going to stack, make sure you have both your arms under thier legs. Don't be silly and try to stack them while still in their guard.


    I also remember being on my back and putting him back in my guard from my half guard and sweeping him. I also remember being restarded standing an single legging him, and escaping a second triangle. Before the decision my opponent ran up to me and gave me huge hug and thanked me for what he thought was a great fight.
    Sounds like good action. Again, VIDEOTAPE. OMG OMGO M G. Get into the technology~ Nothing is a better than being able to replay every mistake in slow motion and reliving the match. You will get better just by watching TV. No ****.

    What struck me most about competing was how much more intense it was than rolling in the dojo. It was much more different than I had anticipated.
    That's the suprise most people have in their first few tournaments. Everything is harder, faster, and more exhausting than in the gym. You might be a stud in the gym and be able to go 5 matches of 5 minutes back to back. But at your first tournament you are gassed 2 minutes into your first match. Why? Conditioning is the primary factor, but nerves and adreneline cause you to burn out real fast. Your forearms will be jacked. You are dumping buckets of sweat. And you don't seem to be able to do what you can do in the gym.

    Being able to perform under pressure is the primary reason to compete.


    I'm definitly competing again at the next opportunity.
    There ya go.

    That's the right attitude. Competition can be addictive. The anxiety. The fear. The thrill of winning. The feeling of complete exhaustion, but total relaxation on the way home after winning is unmatched, IMHO. Putting it all on the line and testing yourself is one of the best ways to really see what you are made of.
  9. PoleFighter is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/11/2005 2:06am


     Style: Sandbagged BJJ white belt

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Yrkoon9

    Opps. If they pass they get 3. If you roll over and give the back you lose another 4.

    A BETTER strategy when someone is passing is getting to all fours and then putting them BACK in guard. You don't really lose points here and can recover nicely. Some guys games are entirely based on this strategy.
    My strategy here was: Roll over on all four, grab his far knee and put him in my guard. If that didn't work, I planned on rolling him if he went for the neck or body without having the hooks in (by rolling away from him). Didn't have time though.

    A good drill for this is:

    A) Hip escape
    B) Immediately get to all fours.
    C) Slip your knee under you and go back to guard.
    Thanks.





    First things first when someone gets your back you need to roll them so you are BOTH facing the sky. Then you push back into them protecting your neck. Once you have them flat, and your neck is protected you are okay. They are now carrying your weight. You want to slide off them to the correct side (determined by which arm is trying to choke) and keep them flat. Then you want to roll into them, thus putting yourself in their guard. Removing a foot is a good plan, but putting them flat and rolling into their guard is of more importance, and you can get into their guard without removing a foot oftentimes.

    I say this because it SOUNDS like you were on all 4 fours or sitting while trying to remove a foot and got choked out. Better to defend the neck and try to slide them than get choked out. At worst you slide them, and they bail and take mount. Again, bad - but still better than getting choked out.
    In more detail: I rolled him so we were both looking at the ceiling. He had my collar on one side. WHat I didn't think about was that I should have gone for the foot on the opposite to the hand that was holding my gi, so I could roll away from the choke.

    A trap. A flexible persons trap. They let you stack to pass, roll into this fucked up bent over ****. You get aggressive thinking you have them, and go for it. They keep one arm, and walk their shoulder back while popping their hips up to triangle you. If you are going to stack, make sure you have both your arms under thier legs. Don't be silly and try to stack them while still in their guard.
    I don't really remember the details, but I was 100% around. His head was between my knees, and I still coudln't complete the pass. Then he just rolled somehow and bam, I'm in his guard. :llorar: I've never rolled with anyone that flexible...

    What would suck is if you beat yourself. For instance the thing that makes me sick is people who go to compete who are not ready, and end up screwing themselves. Like...not being in shape and gassing out, not able to give a good performance and losing.
    In a way I did beath myself then. I had been so busy with school the previous week (had a huge, very important paper to hand in the day before the comp.) so I wasn't really there mentally or physically. I still went because I thought I would learn something, and hey, I did.

    Thanks for the lengthy reply.
    I pointed at him [the panhandler], bringing my rear hand up in a subtle approximation of the double Wu Sau guard that is the default hand position in Wing Chun Kung Fu.

    "Step away," I hissed.
    -Phil Elmore
  10. Yrkoon9 is offline
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    Brock Sampson

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    Posted On:
    4/11/2005 10:01am

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     Style: 5.56

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PoleFighter
    In more detail: I rolled him so we were both looking at the ceiling. He had my collar on one side. WHat I didn't think about was that I should have gone for the foot on the opposite to the hand that was holding my gi, so I could roll away from the choke.
    Here is something to think about.

    During the collar choke, yes, there is a correct side to roll to. One side unwinds the choke, the other side tightens it.

    But at this point, when he has the collar, removing the foot is not your priority. The priority is making sure he cannot get the 2nd hand in position to finish. One hand just won't do it.

    Again, you don't NEED to remove the foot to turn. Yes it helps. But when putting down priorities it falls below controlling the 2nd hand.

    I let people take my back all the time so I can work this defense, since it is one of the scariest positions. Roll him. Then protect neck. Slide off to the side as I make sure the 2nd hand cannot finish the choke. Once off to the side I check my options. If its safe I try to remove a foot and roll. If not I may wait a min to see if his grip weakens. I may try to remove that grip. I may just try to slip an arm between us and turn.


    I don't really remember the details, but I was 100% around. His head was between my knees, and I still coudln't complete the pass. Then he just rolled somehow and bam, I'm in his guard. :llorar: I've never rolled with anyone that flexible...
    Okay, that one is sneaky.

    We do a drill where one guy is on his back with his head facing the other guy who is standing/knees. The bottom guy tries to bend his legs over his head and cross them under the top guys armpits (or whereever) and then spin as he unwinds into the guard. Difficult to explain in words.

    This is very similar to what happened to you. Flexible guys own at this.
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