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  1. JKing is offline

    No longer a Kaju-Critic

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2005 4:52am

    supporting member
     Style: Kajukenbo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Sport Jiujitsu - yes? no?

    A off and on training buddy of mine has really gotten into this stuff. Appreantly its growing in popularity and its called "sport jiujitsu" (forgive me if I'm years behind the news of this). Its basically medium (and sometimes hard?) contact point sparring mixed with (from my pov) judo competition. Anyone know anything about this? Any opinions or facts?



    For those of you who are curious, these are the rules:

    # One Point
    1: For crisp, clean striking techniques delivered with either hand or foot to legal target areas, (To score a point to the body in Black Belt division medium to hard contact is mandatory) Hand strikes to the head (to the head gear area) with light or touch contact only, will be awarded one point. (The head contact must indicate that the potential was there for a harder blow)
    2: Kicks to the inner and outer thigh with light to medium contact using roundhouse kicks only (mawashi geri) will be awarded one point. (Kicks at or near the knee will be a major penalty loss of 2 points.)
    3: A flurry may be considered a repetitive number of doubtful strikes and only one point will be awarded. (At judges discretion).
    4: Each strike must be seen to be a potentially damaging or injurious blow and will be awarded one point (except for head kick).
    5: Any combination strikes will be considered on their own merit, they will be considered as multiple points or a flurry, at judges discretion.
    6: Once stand up grappling commences, multiple strikes will be allowed and counted for both competitors within the 5 seconds allowed, then they must break the grappling hold.
    # One Point – To be awarded for any takedown, other than a half or full throw. (Where it is shown that one competitor initiated and was in control of the takedown.)
    # Two Points
    # – Will be awarded for a controlled kick to the head that makes no more than light or touch contact to head gear area. Multiple Points
    – Will be awarded for achieving any legitimate hold down position during the allotted ground time.
    Points for hold downs are: (Black Belts) 2 points for every 10 seconds up to the 30 second time limit
    (Kyu belts and Juniors). One point for every 5 seconds up to the 15 second time limit. The time will be monitored and determined by the timekeeper. The hold down time will start officially by a signal from the centre referee (his/her arm extended out over the competitors).
    *NOTE* A competitor cannot be saved by the bell (time limit of rounds) once a hold down has started, it will be allowed to continue to completion for 2 points Black Belt, or 1 point Junior or Kyu Belts.
    # This will apply only if ground time has not run out. Two Points
    # – Will be awarded for a legitimate and controlled half-throw or sweep scored on an opponent that causes one foot to leave the mat (such as O'Soto Gari, or Ko Soto Gari). Three Points
    # – Will be awarded for a full throw or sweep scored on an opponent that causes both feet to leave the mat (such as various hip throws, or shoulder throws). Four Points
    – Will be awarded for a submission by referee intervention, (this is when, in the opinion of the centre referee there would be severe injury caused if the lock or choke continued).
    *NOTE* Any submission that causes a competitor to tap out is an automatic win.

    You can hold for 5 seconds (standing)
    two 2 minute rounds


    Illegal techniques
    1. Head butts
    2. Hair pulling
    3. Scratching
    4. Biting
    5. Elbow or knee strikes
    6. Any finger strikes
    7. Any blind techniques
    8. Kicking a competitor on the ground
    9. Striking to the head while on the ground
    10. Kick to the knee (this will be assessed as a major penalty)
    11. Intentional attack to nerve points of the head, face, or neck areas.
    12. Any finger, toe or heel locks. (twisting of the heel, not ankle lock)
    13. Respiratory chokes (across the throat)



    To me personally it seems more like a training method over compeition material... but thats just me. Again, I have no experience with "sport jiujitsu" and am hoping someone here does.
  2. fanatical is offline
    fanatical's Avatar

    Hi, guys

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2005 5:52am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have no experience with it I'm sorry to say. Yet. Since I have no competition behind me yet :(
    It's "all the rage" in scandinavia as far as I know. At least Swedish and Norwegian JJ compete in this. What I remember is that it's Swedish really :D. Ingemar Sköld and his student Ricard Carneborn wrote down a basic system of what they thought was the most interesting and amusing (Randori ^^) in november 1998. After a while, a larger system formed, they applied acceptance for the style by their JJ federation and tadaa, a new style. Sport-Jujutsu. Pure Sport-Jujutsu style clubs are up to a number of 25 in Scandinavia (not very huge yet) But as I understand, lots of JJ schools have started competing by the same premises, which is good of course :) .

    SJJ Has enabled people to get their 2. and 3.dan grades through competition results as well. So it's a pretty competition focused system.

    These results are:
    2. dan: At least 10 competitions or more in 2 years (with proper results) And at least 20 matches or more in the competitions they're counting points in.

    3.dan: 15 competitions in 3 years. At least 5 medals nationally. And must have competed internationally.

    It's pretty young still. I'm not surprised people haven't caught up on it. Not new to me, hehe. But I guess it takes some time for info to drift across the atlantic :P

    homepage (in swedish T_T) http://www.sportju-jutsu.com

    This is all I'm digging up at the moment. I'll see what else I can find.

    If this is a totally different SJJ, then, hell you got me :P
    More human than human is our motto.
  3. Gezere is offline
    Gezere's Avatar

    My guns bigger than Scrapper's!

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2005 11:57am

    supporting member
     Style: Kakutogi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Euro Sport JJ is pretty much the rave here as well. Many of the Polezei (German Police) train and compete in it. However when I was in western Germany they were kind of upset by a sexy black american ringer that came in and cleaned house!:D

    We call it MMA Lite now and its pple get their feet wet before going full MMA.
    ______
    Xiao Ao Jiang Hu Zhi Dong Fang Bu Bai (Laughing Proud Warrior Invincible Asia) Dark Emperor of Baji!!!

    RIP SOLDIER

    Didn't anyone ever tell him a fat man could never be a ninja
    -Gene, GODHAND

    You can't practice Judo just to win a Judo Match! You practice so that no matter what happens, you can win using Judo!
    The key to fighting two men at once is to be much tougher than both of them.
    -Daniel Tosh
  4. BSDaemon is offline
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    Being Sublime Daily

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2005 12:10pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ/MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    When I hear "sport jiujitsu", I think of gi-grappling with no strikes. The rules you posted seem much more liberal. I guess it's a euro-thing. But what do I know, I'm a newbie. I had the choice between a sport jiujitsu oriented GJJ school and a no-gi MMA oriented school and I chose the latter.
  5. ojgsxr6 is offline

    Dorkus Malorkus

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2005 12:28pm

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     Style: Boxing/BJJudo/Crossfit

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I actually like the concept of Sport Ju Jitsu better than MMA. I wish I could find comps like that in the NY area. I'd like it even better if it were continuous over point.
  6. JKing is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2005 2:26pm

    supporting member
     Style: Kajukenbo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    dont quote me on it but from my understanding the action is continous for the most part
  7. PoleFighter is offline

    Professional Swede

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2005 2:43pm


     Style: Sandbagged BJJ white belt

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Like Fanatical pointed out, it's pretty big in Scandinavia. We share our dojo with a couple of guys who compete in it, but their style is called Combat JJ. Nobody from my BJJ-club who has trained with them was overly impressed. My own experience tells me their ne-waza is very power based and stiff andlacks guard work. They also seem to turtle at every opportunity, for some reason, which I guess has to do with the rules.
    I pointed at him [the panhandler], bringing my rear hand up in a subtle approximation of the double Wu Sau guard that is the default hand position in Wing Chun Kung Fu.

    "Step away," I hissed.
    -Phil Elmore
  8. Dochter is offline

    Neutral, or nearly so

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2005 2:51pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PoleFighter
    Like Fanatical pointed out, it's pretty big in Scandinavia. We share our dojo with a couple of guys who compete in it, but their style is called Combat JJ. Nobody from my BJJ-club who has trained with them was overly impressed. My own experience tells me their ne-waza is very power based and stiff andlacks guard work. They also seem to turtle at every opportunity, for some reason, which I guess has to do with the rules.
    Go compete then.
  9. PoleFighter is offline

    Professional Swede

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2005 2:58pm


     Style: Sandbagged BJJ white belt

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Why should I? I have no interest in their sport.
    I pointed at him [the panhandler], bringing my rear hand up in a subtle approximation of the double Wu Sau guard that is the default hand position in Wing Chun Kung Fu.

    "Step away," I hissed.
    -Phil Elmore
  10. ORION_SOG is offline

    Amateur Fighter/Instructor

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    Posted On:
    4/07/2005 4:11pm


     Style: Judo/BehriBJJ/Muay/Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    As I am the assistant coach to the U.S. National Ju-Jitsu team for Sport Ju-Jitsu I am probably quallified to answer this question..
    Here in the U.S. we have the USJJF (United Stated Ju-Jitsu Federation) it is the U.S. governing body for the JJIF (Ju-Jitsu International Federation) which is the offical sanctioning body for Sport Ju-Jitsu, and it is already a World Games sport. As far as competetions there are relitively few here in the U.S. The top competitors in the sport are usualy pretty good all around and have usually competed internationaly in either Judo, Kickboxing, BJJ or had a few MMA fights, however most of the competetitors are very onesided, and most of the schools that are teaching JJIF (Ju-Jitsu International Federation) rules are seriously lacking the ability to combine all 3 phases of competition. In Europe it is very big as well as South America, Most countries have IOC (International Olympic Committee) sponsered team's the U.S. however does not, and all the athlete's pay all their own expenses. It is different than MMA light in the sence that there is no striking while grappeling, and the points are awarded differently.

    -1 point for a clean strike (Wazari)
    -2 points for a hard clean strike (Ippon)
    -1 point for wazari (Nage Waza) "there is no score for koka or yuko"
    -2 points for Ippon (Nage Waza)
    -1 point for pin of 25 seconds (Wazari)
    -2 points for pin of 30 seconds (Ippon)
    -3 points for submission (Ippon)
    -You must compete in all 3 phases ie. striking/ throwing/ and grappling. there are penilities for trying to avoid any phase.
    -Points are awarded in conssesion and most points at end of match wins.
    -Full point in each of the 3 phases wins (full house)
    -14 point difference in either one of the 2minute rounds wins (near fall)

    If you are looking to compete in something other than full contact MMA it is a good way to learn transition fighting. However if you are only into Full Contact MMA you will probably be disapointed...
    You have to understand that this is probably the sport that will take MMA into the Olympic Games, as there have to be rules to insure the safety of the athete's as per the IOC mandate... as well as there has to be an International governing body for the sport, and there has to be National governing bodies as well.
    And this is the only Organization so far that has all that in place...

    It is a difficult sell as most of the BJJ guys dont like it cause of the Karate and Judo rules.
    The Karate guys dont like it cause of the Judo and BJJ rules.
    The Judo guys dont like it cause of the karate, and BJJ rules.

    If you want more info go to their website at USJJF.org
    I do have to warn you that like all organizations there are some really bad schools that are affiliated with it, as well as some really good ones.. Ie.. Gene LeBell's....

    I hope this helps...... Kris
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