222074 Bullies, 4168 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 31 to 40 of 143
Page 4 of 15 FirstFirst 1234 567814 ... LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Aesopian is offline

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    4,501

    Posted On:
    3/01/2005 11:46am

    Business Class Supporting Member
     Aesopian.com 

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was just at a MMA event in Tampa the Friday before last. Can you guess how every fight ended, even between muay thai fighters and boxers?

    ON THE GROUND.

    I'll just share a single fight. It was a classic wrestler versus boxer match. The boxer CLEARLY out struck the wrestler standing. So what did the wrestler do? HE TOOK IT TO THE GROUND. Boxing didn't work so well any more. He was mounted and hammered in the face with punches, tapping out to just strikes.

    Do you see why I would think ground fighting is so important, ESPECIALLY to a stand up fighter?
  2. KuNg FooL is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Manhattan
    Posts
    428

    Posted On:
    3/01/2005 12:04pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by TylerDurden
    If you look at the past of MMA fighting that statement does bear out. Grapplers with bad stand up fair better than strikers with bad grappling. Look at the fortunes of Leko in recent Prides. A great K1 kickboxer who has gotten owned in the MMA ring do to his lack of grappling. While somewhat one dimensional wrestler Mark Coleman had won titles in Pride in the past.

    Now some strikes have made very good transitions like Cro Cop and Lidell. But both of them have worked incredibly hard to get up to speed on their grappling. Basically it's easier to take someone down than to knock them out.
    Yeah, I've seen Cro Cop fight a lot and most of the time he's standing up and beating the **** out of people. I think he's a great stand up fighter. Bas Rutten, same thing. Great stand up fighter. I do think though that if they don't have any experience on the ground that they're being really naive. I definitely think it would be important to learn to fight on the ground, even for guys who have been so successful standing up.


    Quote Originally Posted by Aesopian
    I was just at a MMA event in Tampa the Friday before last. Can you guess how every fight ended, even between muay thai fighters and boxers?

    ON THE GROUND.

    I'll just share a single fight. It was a classic wrestler versus boxer match. The boxer CLEARLY out struck the wrestler standing. So what did the wrestler do? HE TOOK IT TO THE GROUND. Boxing didn't work so well any more. He was mounted and hammered in the face with punches, tapping out to just strikes.

    Do you see why I would think ground fighting is so important, ESPECIALLY to a stand up fighter?
    You keep saying it like I'm still trying to decide if learning to fight on the ground is worth it. I WANT TO LEARN TO FIGHT ON THE GROUND. I WANT TO LEARN BJJ. I am definitely going to join that school I found. I've said already, the question isn't whether or not I'm going to, the question is when am I going to feel comfortable enough with stand up fighting that I can stop that training to learn BJJ.
  3. TylerDurden is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Cheeseland
    Posts
    1,177

    Posted On:
    3/01/2005 12:12pm


     Style: BJJ/Judo/HapKiDo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Bas Rutten had extensive grappling training, and Cro Cop worked with wrestlers to get his sprawl down to an art form and now trains very hard in BJJ.
    Is Wayne Brady gonna have to choke a bitch?
  4. Maestro Nobones is offline
    Maestro Nobones's Avatar

    rawr

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    736

    Posted On:
    3/01/2005 12:39pm

    supporting member
     Style: Mushin Dao, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well I know exactly where you're coming from man, and honestly if you have the drive and the cash, enroll in both courses. Train standup and BJJ. It'll be worth it.

    I've been a standup practitioner for over 10 years, and I'm just starting BJJ and I tell you what, I feel like a total newbie. I got choked out with my own arm last class.
    Come on, how cool is that? Nothing in your tiger claw class will prepare you for the awesomeness of BJJ. And I personally LOVE tiger claw.
  5. KuNg FooL is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Manhattan
    Posts
    428

    Posted On:
    3/01/2005 12:44pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ok, so would any of you say that only knowing BJJ makes you a well rounded fighter? Hopefully you'd be smart and say no. So that means that learning to fight standing up is an important thing to have along with learning to fight on the ground. Now would you say that learning to fight standing up for only a year and a half is good enough to be finished with it and go straight to the BJJ, or would you think you'd need a little more experience before you can say you're good enough and then move on to BJJ? That's what I've been trying to get at. I don't think a year and a half is good enough to just stop my stand up training. I want to know more before I stop it altogether and start training in BJJ. Wouldn't you agree that that's a good idea?
  6. Aesopian is offline

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    4,501

    Posted On:
    3/01/2005 12:50pm

    Business Class Supporting Member
     Aesopian.com 

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    To be honest, I think doing Fu-Jow Pai over BJJ for any reason is stupid.
  7. Doc is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    22

    Posted On:
    3/01/2005 12:50pm


     Style: Kali

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by KuNg FooL
    Ok, so would any of you say that only knowing BJJ makes you a well rounded fighter? Hopefully you'd be smart and say no. So that means that learning to fight standing up is an important thing to have along with learning to fight on the ground. Now would you say that learning to fight standing up for only a year and a half is good enough to be finished with it and go straight to the BJJ, or would you think you'd need a little more experience before you can say you're good enough and then move on to BJJ? That's what I've been trying to get at. I don't think a year and a half is good enough to just stop my stand up training. I want to know more before I stop it altogether and start training in BJJ. Wouldn't you agree that that's a good idea?
    From the site's description, it's hard to tell what is included in the $99 you'd be paying for the BJJ classes. Call and ask, since the Vale Tudo or Kickboxing classes might be included. Wouldn't that solve the problem?
  8. hanbang is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sweden, Stockholm
    Posts
    40

    Posted On:
    3/01/2005 12:50pm


     Style: MMA (Shooto)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    (EDIT:This is directed at Kung Fool)

    Your posts bring me great pain-_-

    You seem to think that training BJJ equals a lifelong commitment to never ever doing any more striking.
    I mean seriously, wtf? Do a month of BJJ, surely you can go back to your striking place at any time?

    It's not like training in BJJ is going to make you a worse striker, what on earth is the problem? You can always become a better striker, just as you can always become a better grappler, doing a month of BJJ now or a month of BJJ in 10 years makes no differance in that sense.

    Or find an MMA school and train in both?
    Your posts are seriously painful to read.
    Last edited by hanbang; 3/01/2005 12:53pm at .
  9. KuNg FooL is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Manhattan
    Posts
    428

    Posted On:
    3/01/2005 12:57pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Doc
    From the site's description, it's hard to tell what is included in the $99 you'd be paying for the BJJ classes. Call and ask, since the Vale Tudo or Kickboxing classes might be included. Wouldn't that solve the problem?
    That's a really good point. I'll have to find out about that. If that was included then I'd be getting exactly what I want.


    Quote Originally Posted by hanbang
    (EDIT:This is directed at Kung Fool)

    Your posts bring me great pain-_-

    You seem to think that training BJJ equals a lifelong commitment to never ever doing any more striking.
    I mean seriously, wtf? Do a month of BJJ, surely you can go back to your striking place at any time?

    It's not like training in BJJ is going to make you a worse striker, what on earth is the problem? You can always become a better striker, just as you can always become a better grappler, doing a month of BJJ now or a month of BJJ in 10 years makes no differance in that sense.

    Or find an MMA school and train in both?
    Your posts are seriously painful to read.
    Well, if doing it now or later makes no difference, wouldn't you agree that sticking with what I'm doing well with would be the best idea, then eventually switching over to the BJJ? I mean going back and forth would probably be annoying and make me advance pretty slowly. Also, like Doc just said, if they include the Vale Tudo or kickboxing with the BJJ, then I'd get to do both at once and then the problem is solved. What's so wrong about me wanting to get to a certain level with my stand up skills before I switch to BJJ?
  10. hanbang is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sweden, Stockholm
    Posts
    40

    Posted On:
    3/01/2005 1:02pm


     Style: MMA (Shooto)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You make it seem like a problem to TRY bjj for a month.
    What, they wont let you back in at your kung fu place if you do this?

    You found this school. It looks like fun.
    Everyone says 'Go try it out!'.
    Now the problem is you aren't good enough of a striker.
    What? WHAT?

    If it does include vale tudo that's of course great, but why not just go for a free trial (assuming them have one) or pay for a class or two just to get a feel for it..

    You are just finding reasons not to go is what it looks like to me..

    Quote Originally Posted by KuNg FooL
    Ok, so would any of you say that only knowing BJJ makes you a well rounded fighter? Hopefully you'd be smart and say no. So that means that learning to fight standing up is an important thing to have along with learning to fight on the ground. Now would you say that learning to fight standing up for only a year and a half is good enough to be finished with it and go straight to the BJJ, or would you think you'd need a little more experience before you can say you're good enough and then move on to BJJ? That's what I've been trying to get at. I don't think a year and a half is good enough to just stop my stand up training. I want to know more before I stop it altogether and start training in BJJ. Wouldn't you agree that that's a good idea?
    See, here's what I mean; you say 'finished' with striking as if once you go grappling, you never go back..
    Why is this?
    1.5 years most likely haven't turned you into the incredible hulk of standup, but depending on what you train for, and how you train you may never be.. Check bjj out for a month, go back to your striking if you wish or just continue with BJJ.

    OR find an MMA class (do you say an MMA class since it's Em Em Aei or do you say a MMA class since it's mixed martial arts?) and you'll be doing plenty of both :)
    Last edited by hanbang; 3/01/2005 1:06pm at .
Page 4 of 15 FirstFirst 1234 567814 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.