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  1. Boomstick is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/16/2004 5:35pm


     Style: Mixed/Freestyle Kickboxin

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Plyometrics Anyone?

    I have read a little bit about this and spoken with some friends that play football about adding plyometrics into their lifting routine. The studies I read say that you will often get more strength out of the muscles you are training. Has anyone incorperated this into their routines? Do you do them in the pool or in a cardio/studio environment? Many Thanks for your input...
  2. poidog is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/16/2004 5:38pm

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     Style: FMA, DBMA, MMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Boomstick
    I have read a little bit about this and spoken with some friends that play football about adding plyometrics into their lifting routine. The studies I read say that you will often get more strength out of the muscles you are training. Has anyone incorperated this into their routines? Do you do them in the pool or in a cardio/studio environment? Many Thanks for your input...
    You need to be in pretty damn good shape before integrating plyometrics into your routine, from what I understand. Otherwise you're setting yourself up for some really fun injuries.
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  3. Boomstick is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/16/2004 5:45pm


     Style: Mixed/Freestyle Kickboxin

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I should refine this a little bit... I am not looking to get into any weighted plyometrics, but more the type of, "stand on one box, jump down, then spring to the other box" etc. I am looking to stay away from any springing of weights onto my muscles... body weight only.
    I have heard that you need to be careful, thus the pool plyometrics and proper stretching, but still thanks for the heads up. It is something anyone else who hasn't tried it should know about before adding it into the routine.
    Last edited by Boomstick; 12/16/2004 6:18pm at .
  4. TaeBo_Master is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/18/2004 3:46am

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You need to start with a base of good stabilization strength. Then you want to work reactive exercises before you get into true plyometrics (plyometrics are an extension of reactive exercise).

    An example of a reactive exercise: Jump up onto a box. Stabilize. Step down. Repeat.
    An example of a plyometric exercise: Jump up onto a box. Jump down immediately. Jump up immediately, and so on.
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  5. TaeBo_Master is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/18/2004 3:49am

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     Style: Judo, Jujitsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Also, plyometric don't increase strength per se. They increase power. Strength is a muscle's ability to produce tension, in a basic definition. Power is "speed strength" or the ability to utilize strength over a period of time, the shorter the time, the more power.

    Plyometrics are primarily useful for enhancing a muscle's ability to quickly reduce force eccentrically, stabilize force isometrically and then produce force concentrically. Remember, a muscle always reduces force and stabilizes before it produces force, so increasing the muscle's ability to do these two steps will hasten your ability to produce force.
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  6. Nid is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/19/2004 12:53pm

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     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    :sad3:

    That makes NO sense.
  7. Boomstick is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/19/2004 2:27pm


     Style: Mixed/Freestyle Kickboxin

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    So basically thru using plyometrics you are shorting the time it takes for the muscles to go from rest to active?
  8. TaeBo_Master is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/20/2004 3:47am

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     Style: Judo, Jujitsu

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    Keinhaar - what part makes no sense?

    Boomstick - Plyometric help go from eccentric to concentric more quickly, primarily.
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  9. Nid is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/20/2004 8:36pm

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     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Also, plyometrics don't increase strength per se. They increase power. Strength is a muscle's ability to produce tension, in a basic definition.
    Strength=ability to produce force. Power = Square peg/round hole as far as what muscles do. If you push the matter you better start measuring your fitness in terms of watts. Half-understood physics is bad juju.

    Power is "speed strength" or the ability to utilize strength over a period of time, the shorter the time, the more power.
    Muscle CAN perform mechanical work.

    Endurance is the ability to utilize the muscles ability to produce force over a period of time too.

    Strength and endurance is also the ability to perform ZERO work over any number of time increments. Know what I mean?

    Plyometrics are primarily useful for enhancing a muscle's ability to quickly reduce force eccentrically, stabilize force isometrically...
    You don't do things to force. Force acts on things. If you mean to use these terms of physics in any meaningful way you can't go around making up your own definitions or using them in some nebulous vernacular. Force (and that which makes it what it is) is intertwined with "power". You screw up one thing and the house of understanding comes tumbling down.

    Remember, a muscle always reduces force and stabilizes before it produces force, so increasing the muscle's ability to do these two steps will hasten your ability to produce force.
    Meaningless.

    Plyometric help go from eccentric to concentric more quickly, primarily.
    ?

    Not unless the given activity involves transitioning from an eccentric to concentric whatever-the-****. But again, there is no GENERIC ABILITY TO DO SO WHICH TRANSCENDS ALL ACTIVITIES.

    In short, plyometrics are pretty usless.
    Last edited by Nid; 12/20/2004 8:41pm at .
  10. Boogers is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/28/2004 10:26pm


     Style: BKK karate, boxing, Amok

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I try to use plyometrics as much as possible to increase my slow heavyweight speed. Strength work is good, but as I practise TKD I need all the help I can get to speed up against smaller guys.

    I do stuff like step aerobics to augment my legs and stabiilty. If you go for maximum power, height and 'explosion' to your techniques you get a fair workout.

    It appears to my beginner mind that technique within plyometrics, as well as being 'loose' before exploding out, is super important. It works for me and I'm gradually improving speed and core stability. Forget weights until you find your body weight is no challenge whatsoever, but I'd keep it very light and go for reps.
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