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  1. #41

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ronin69
    Soto Uke is an inward block with the inner forearm, about "a fist"above the elbow joint.

    What he said. And an 'Ute Uke' is an outward block at about the same level. They can be used in combinations very effectively together.

    I have no webhosting, so pics/video will have to come from someone else.

  2. #42
    fernando's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ok! in your experience is that block functional, from what i picture i dont think it would work in a sparring scenario
    Last edited by fernando; 12/01/2004 4:34pm at .

  3. #43

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Then I'm not explaining it well. Its a very basic block, and it works very well in sparring.

  4. #44

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In boxing, when you have your guard up and a guy tries for a strike to the stomach, if you were "blocking" with your right arm, you would block/parry the strike by shifting your left hip back and thrusting your right inner forearm to make the block.
    You waist would twist towars the left.

    That is similar to the soto uke block.

  5. #45

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    While this is NOT a picture of Oyama doing a soto uke, the positioning is similar, just imagine the left arm coming in as he does the "block".
    You don't lean in though.

  6. #46
    fernando's Avatar
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    i get it, so dont lean in and not pull the fist back, i kept thnking of the wax on wax off template!

  7. #47

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    I never gave Krav a bad review because it has a funny idea about how fighting works in alot of drills and concepts they give you. Repetition and perfecting technique would not be something I would give a bad score to. Krav has alot of it, though its usually against bags and hand pads. I think, with the amount of time I've spent doing martial arts, that I could judge how a style prepares you within 6 months. If you recall, I also broke the assesment into sections. Fitness, fight ability, self defense, mind set, whatever. If in six months you are not getting any results except a better LOOKING technique, then theres a problem.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by JKing
    I never gave Krav a bad review because it has a funny idea about how fighting works in alot of drills and concepts they give you. Repetition and perfecting technique would not be something I would give a bad score to. Krav has alot of it, though its usually against bags and hand pads. I think, with the amount of time I've spent doing martial arts, that I could judge how a style prepares you within 6 months. If you recall, I also broke the assesment into sections. Fitness, fight ability, self defense, mind set, whatever. If in six months you are not getting any results except a better LOOKING technique, then theres a problem.
    Fair enough. I don't know what your previous MA experience is, but if it's extensive, then I'm sure you would see things in ways I can't. My sensei would probably be able to sum up a dojo within a few visits. I'm not.


    BTW, I really DID like how you broke down your review. It was easy to read and covered a lot of ground. I was not criticizing your abilities or your ability to write. I was just pointing out that a nOOb at our place wouldn't really be able to appreciate the finer points of what we do, so a critique after six months wouldn't be conclusive.

  9. #49

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ronin69
    This is debatable.
    I think the difference lies on the practitioner and his goals.
    If he is a casual, hobbist kind of practitioner (letīs say 3 two hours workouts), then a more focused style will yield better results, since, by doing a single kind of range, the practitioner will get better quicker, and he wonīt be as confused in a fight (heīll always try to take things to his preffered range).
    However, for a serious, competing fighter, itīs vital to crosstrain. Bear in mind that a fighter will have to match up with other people who also crosstrain, so the lack of a range will result in a defeat. But the people who train to fight this way devote most of their time to train, something a casual practitioner will not do.
    Canuckyokushin:

    These women can do back flips right over my head and still land on there feet .GRrrrrrrr!

    feedback:

    THAT'S NOTHING, I USED TO KNOW SOME 12 YEAR-OLDS WHO COULD FIT INSIDE A SUITCASE AND STAY ALIVE FOR 7 OR WAS IT 6 HOURS

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