221365 Bullies, 3945 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 10
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. chi-conspiricy is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    China
    Posts
    348

    Posted On:
    11/19/2004 4:50am


     Style: Poor mma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    "Slow Burn" or "Power of 10"?

    Has anyone done either of these slow motion weight training regiments? I've been following "Power of 10" from Adam Zickerman, and had amazing muscle build, and fat loss. I'm wondering if there will be any unwanted side effects from extended slow-weight training, like loss in punching or kicking speed?
  2. Nid is offline

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,530

    Posted On:
    11/19/2004 8:42am

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm quite partial to an especially slow cadence, myself.

    As for negative side effects, shouldn't *you* know by now?
  3. Jekyll is offline
    Jekyll's Avatar

    .

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    On the wrong side of the pond for gong sau
    Posts
    2,086

    Posted On:
    11/19/2004 9:21am

    supporting member
     Style: San shou(tai chi) +judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    www.informfitness.com/ihow.htm

    Best shape of your life with 20minutes a week exercise?

    I sense a STFU n00b coming.

    Before your reaming, you do know that its best to train specificly for the type of use you're going to put your muscles too, so you should do olympic lifting for explosive power.

    Having said that slow repititions are good for building stability especialy when done in conjucture with a swiss ball, however they use machines which means you dont gain any stability benifits at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stickx
    It must suck for legit practitioners of tai chi like Cullion to see their art get all watered down into exercise for seniors.
    Those who esteme qi have no strength. ~ Exposition of Insights into the Thirteen Postures Attrib: Wu Yuxiang founder of Wu style tai chi.
  4. chi-conspiricy is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    China
    Posts
    348

    Posted On:
    11/19/2004 12:42pm


     Style: Poor mma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by keinhaar
    I'm quite partial to an especially slow cadence, myself.

    As for negative side effects, shouldn't *you* know by now?
    I've done it for only a month and a half. There's just lots of critisism about weight training, and how if you're not careful with it, it will slow you down.
  5. chi-conspiricy is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    China
    Posts
    348

    Posted On:
    11/19/2004 1:52pm


     Style: Poor mma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jekyll
    www.informfitness.com/ihow.htm

    Best shape of your life with 20minutes a week exercise?

    I sense a STFU n00b coming.

    Before your reaming, you do know that its best to train specificly for the type of use you're going to put your muscles too, so you should do olympic lifting for explosive power.

    Having said that slow repititions are good for building stability especialy when done in conjucture with a swiss ball, however they use machines which means you dont gain any stability benifits at all.
    I did the "conventional" workout plan for awhile, weights/calisthenics 3 times a week, hard cardio the rest. I didn't post to debate wether slow weights work for getting in shape. I personally know it works MUCH better than any conventional workout I've done. I'm finally pain free, and I've become much stronger, much faster than before.

    I guesss a better question is this, what exactly does weight lifting do to your muscles that can potentially slow you down?
  6. NextGuard is offline
    NextGuard's Avatar

    Welterweight

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    617

    Posted On:
    11/19/2004 2:08pm

    supporting member
     Style: Street

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    >>Fitness expert Adam Zickerman presents a revolutionary exercise program - slow strength training - that will forever change the way people work out.

    The Power of 10 seems to contradict nearly everything we're accustomed to hearing about exercise. Forget hours on the treadmill, and forget daily visits to the gym. This new program offers 20 minute workout sessions, once or twice per week, with an alluring emphasis on rest and recovery on your days off. <<

    It goes on to say the cardio benefits are better too.

    So 20 minutes a week and you get better results than hours of weight lifting plus hours on the treadmill? Sounds like a scam. One of the sad things about this book is that it obscures the actual merit of slow burn exercise (i.e. Hahn's work and Zickerman's more straight forward explanations) by claiming a soft shoe, slick too good to be true spiel that will turn many off.

    http://www.harpercollins.com.au/titl...Author=0019335
    Last edited by NextGuard; 11/20/2004 2:00am at .
    NextGuard = Paul from Atlanta

    Ten years experience can be ten true years or one year repeated ten times.
  7. Nid is offline

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,530

    Posted On:
    11/19/2004 6:37pm

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Chi,

    The only thing scammish about Zickerman is that he's calling it revolutionary. It's basically a modified HIT approach that's been done, in basic principle, for decades. Check out writings by Mike Mentzer, Ken Hutchens etc and you'll find the same axiom at play: brief, intense, infrequent.

    Lifting slowly is just a tool to safely achieve greater intensity (in-roads into the muscle tissue). Playing with the intensity means you have to adjust the other 2 factors. Intensity up...frequency & duration down.

    But, anyway your program is obviously working for you.

    To answer your question, what you do in the gym for general fitness purposes has little to do with "speed" (for better or for worse); that's a factor of skill enhanced only by practicing the sport of your choosing. Not much more to say.
    Last edited by Nid; 11/19/2004 6:55pm at .
  8. Nid is offline

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,530

    Posted On:
    11/19/2004 6:44pm

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    So 20 minutes a week and you get better results than hours of weight lifting plus hours on the treadmill?
    For fitness? Precisely.

    For skill acquistion...no (speaking in terms of time investment).

    Having said that slow repititions are good for building stability especialy when done in conjucture with a swiss ball, however they use machines which means you dont gain any stability benifits at all.
    Stop. Just stop.
  9. Jekyll is offline
    Jekyll's Avatar

    .

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    On the wrong side of the pond for gong sau
    Posts
    2,086

    Posted On:
    11/20/2004 6:33am

    supporting member
     Style: San shou(tai chi) +judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stickx
    It must suck for legit practitioners of tai chi like Cullion to see their art get all watered down into exercise for seniors.
    Those who esteme qi have no strength. ~ Exposition of Insights into the Thirteen Postures Attrib: Wu Yuxiang founder of Wu style tai chi.
  10. chi-conspiricy is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    China
    Posts
    348

    Posted On:
    11/20/2004 1:45pm


     Style: Poor mma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Tanks for the input everyone. I know Zickerman's claims that you don't need to do any cardio are probably a bit of a stretch. I still run, jumprope, spar, and do boxing drills between my weight workouts, but I don't run 4 miles a day like i used to.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.