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  1. xodus2 is offline

    Registered Member

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    Jun 2004
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    Posted On:
    10/11/2004 6:00am


     Style: BJJ, Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Giving up smoking

    ok I'm in my early 30s and I'm finally giving up smoking. I've made the decision (mainly because my father is now in hospital not having a very pleasent time due to smoking til he was 40). My method at the moment is simply will power and it seems to be working so far (I've been careful to avoid pubs especially - as soon as I enter one I start smoking)

    Any advice from people who have given up smoking (or know people who have)?
  2. deus ex machina is offline
    deus ex machina's Avatar

    ***ned

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    Posted On:
    10/11/2004 6:04am

    supporting member
     Style: i

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yeah, I knew a couple of people who gave up smoking.


    They died in the process.
  3. Crucified is offline

    Registered Member

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    Posted On:
    10/11/2004 7:15am


     Style: Kyokushin

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Simple... Just don't light up.

    I quit, just decided I'd had enough and wanted my fitness back... So stopped.

    All depends how much you want to quit really. If you really want to wuit its easy, if you don't then it will be alot harder.
  4. CaptShady is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/11/2004 7:26am


     Style: Beverly Hills Ninjitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yeah, sometimes quitting only because you know you need to isn't motivation enough (although I see you have more than that). The first 4 days were the toughest for me. The only advice I'd give is to think of all the possible future scenarios that will give you the urge to light up, like the pub scenario. I did that, avoided beer, to resist the urge, but then came a day when I was working on some seriously hard code for a few hours straight ... of which would normally result in a looong smoke break. I never anticipated that one, and the urge was strong as hell .. which I gave in to. In the next go 'round, knowing that scenario would come up, mentally I was able to rule it out as a time that I would light up. It may sound stupid, but the method worked for me.
  5. patfromlogan is offline
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    Heavyweight

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    Posted On:
    10/11/2004 11:10am

    supporting member
     Style: Kyokushinkai / Kajukenbo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's not easy, but take it a day, or take it five minutes, at a time. If the thought of never being able to smoke gets to you, and the urge is high, say to yourself, ok ok, I'll have a ciggie, just wait ten minutes. The chemical effect does come partlty through the brain, with out the drug. This has been tested in addicts; when they see the smack and pick up the spoon the chemicals start flowing. (Patches and gum might help if you freak)

    Now if I could only give up sugar and booze.
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez
  6. zenbert is offline
    zenbert's Avatar

    $1.50

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    Posted On:
    10/11/2004 11:47am

    supporting member
     Style: golf club jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    xodus2,

    I gave up smoking cold turkey after smoking about pack and a half a day through college. I have friends who smoke more or less and still trying to give up. Every time I hear them telling me they are giving up, it's one of those deja vu kind of thing. I always thought some people just has less will, but I believe now that physiologically some people are more addicted.

    You're likely to have withdrawals and cravings and what not, and it'll always be easier to light up than not to. I suggest getting a plan together, with a realistic timeline, help from organizations, possibly patches (if they work?), but something that you can commit to and get over the addiction.

    Personally, I think giving up cigarretes is cake compare to the commitment I see with folks putting into training themselves (in MA in particular). If you have put in those sweat and tears into MA, you can do this.

    Giving up smoking was one of the best thing I did for myself and picking up smoking was one of the worse decision in my life.

    "Do or do not, there is no try" -- Yoda
    zenbert
    Hold me... :3some:

    I love MA. Unlike many things in life, you get what you put in.
  7. xodus2 is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/12/2004 10:49am


     Style: BJJ, Kickboxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    good advice ;)
  8. infidel is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/12/2004 11:32am


     Style: bjj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i know two people who quit smoking. both had to try multiple times. so my biggest advice is if you start smoking again, don't dispair, just try again. cause i know at least a few other guys who tried to quit, started again, and then decided it was just too hard.
  9. Little Idea is offline
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    Ready are you? What know you of ready?

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    Posted On:
    10/12/2004 3:56pm

    supporting member
     Style: EBMAS WT(& Prenatal Yoga)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I got seriously addicted to smoking in the Army. At one point, I was running 5-10 miles and smoking a pack a day.

    Don't focus on 'Not smoking', focus on filling your mind and time with other things.

    I tried to quit smoking a few times and always went back as soon as a comfortable smoking situation presented itself (often alchohol was involved).

    The last time I quit, and this may sound a little crazy, I made an effort to be around smokers. When I quit before, I usually removed myself from the situations and friends that smoked, but went back to smoking when I went back to the same situations. Seeing people smoke all the time, while constantly reaffirming that I didn't smoke anymore made it possible to hang out with smoking friends because there was never that mental lapse.

    Getting serious about training helped me a lot too. I haven't smoked since 1995.
    If a `religion' is defined to be a system of ideas that contains unprovable statements, then Godel taught us that mathematics is not only a religion, it is the only religion that can prove itself to be one. -- John Barrow

    Talk to TBK's boyfriend:

  10. Jenfucius is offline

    Shogun of Long Island

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    Posted On:
    10/12/2004 10:30pm

    Join us... or die
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    good for you. every day you smoke you lose lung function and put yourself at higher risk of heart attack, stroke, vascular disease, emphysema, lung ca. every day you don't smoke you get a little better and if you quit for like 10 years you can almost get to where you were if you never smoked.
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