Page 2 of 4 First 1234 Last
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    706
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by supercrap
    punching with your wrist, (ie hitting with the back)
    Ouch. What a fucking stupid thing to do.

    The guy did a ten year stint in a temple to learn it, and by the end of it, could crush bricks between his thumb and forefinger.
    Bullshit.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    ADL, AU
    Posts
    2,812
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by supercrap
    The guy did a ten year stint in a temple to learn it, and by the end of it, could crush bricks between his thumb and forefinger. Use that on somebody's throat and it's goodnight vienna.
    Uh.... WHAT?!

    You do realise how plausible this sounds, right?

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    ADL, AU
    Posts
    2,812
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by wingchunnewbie
    Ouch. What a fucking stupid thing to do.
    If he was using the upper part, that's more or less the forearm. I have seen people doing pushups on flexed wrists, but that was meant more for wristlocking, etc. I have no idea how effective/injury prone it made them.

    But yeah, smacking people with the wrist itself has always been a dubious thing to me.

  4. #14
    Mr. Mantis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    under the sink
    Posts
    6,331
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by wingchunnewbie
    Ouch. What a fucking stupid thing to do.
    On striking with the wrist. Other styles do this besides drunken. Mantis and monkey do it.

    There is supposedly training to develop the wrist for this use, though I have not seen it.

    Without proper training, striking with the wrist could leave you in lots of pain. This once again demonstrates that not all techniques in whatever styles are good for everybody.
    “We are surrounded by warships and don’t have time to talk. Please pray for us.” — One Somali Pirate.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    151
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    http://www.angelfire.com/retro/drunken

    The history is simple. When a kung fu master would get drunk he would be a drunken master, there is drunken monkey drunken tiger and drunken boxing which is the imitation on a master drunk.

  6. #16
    chaosexmachina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    4,499
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I always wondered why the hell they hit people with their wrists bent like some romo... It looks like it hurts, and sounds incredibly retarded.
    "Prison is for rapists, thieves and murderers. If you lock someone up for smoking a plant that makes them happy, you're the fucking criminal." - Joe Rogan

    El Guapo says dance!

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    217
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Doesn't Geoff from the about.com martial arts board have an account on here? A good "what's the deal with Drunken Kung Fu" from someone like that would probably be helpful.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    San Antonio,TX
    Posts
    129
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by chaosexmachina
    I always wondered why the hell they hit people with their wrists bent like some romo... It looks like it hurts, and sounds incredibly retarded.
    Striking with the wrist is good in blocks and against soft tissue areas. Substituting the wrist for a fist or elbow is (in my opinion) moronic. As far as I am aware wrist strikes are fairly common in the training curriculum of most Japanese/Okinawan TMA, but most definitely the focus is in blocking with some pain (to the aggressor) associated with it and not at all a direct striking method.

    Another reason that approach makes sense is because most all of the blocks in the above styles are more general and sweeping, not going for the unrealistic "and then you catch their fist/arm" but more towards you just redirected their strike and kept it from hitting an important area, where as I have mentioned before the conditioning is to make the opponent get some amount of pain just in your blocking as well, etc.

  9. #19
    Meex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Upstate
    Posts
    2,998
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by sherekahn
    Striking with the wrist is good in blocks and against soft tissue areas. Substituting the wrist for a fist or elbow is (in my opinion) moronic.
    Wrist stikes can be a valuable tool in any fighter's skillset. Bending your hand (toward the palm) at the wrist leaves a solid bony mass available to deliver strikes in any direction, with little movement. Mainly used for infighting (from trapping range in), it can also be used as a clubbing weapon from further distances.

    Yes, many (primarily) Okinawan styles use this strike to soft tissue areas. That was not the original intent, but can be reproduced safely in sparring/training.

    I have personally broken forearms, jaws, and a cheekbone with a short, quick, twist of my wrist from trapping, and clinching ranges.

    (it also allows me to throw three strikes with one motion - punch, wrist strike, elbow.)

    If any discount it's (wrist stikes) viability, usefulness, and/or effectiveness, Thank You! The less of us out there, the better.


    `~/

  10. #20
    Mr. Mantis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    under the sink
    Posts
    6,331
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The area of impact with the wrist is on the radial aspect. It helps to go from extension to flexion with the strike. Gives it that extra snap.
    “We are surrounded by warships and don’t have time to talk. Please pray for us.” — One Somali Pirate.

Page 2 of 4 First 1234 Last

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO