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  1. patfromlogan is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/03/2003 2:16pm

    supporting member
     Style: Kyokushinkai / Kajukenbo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "It is impossible to teach you technique over the internet, so I won’t even try." watacrokofshit!What, books, maganzines, videos, and tapes can teach technique, but for some arkane queer reason, the internet can't?

    Always walk on a bright, wide road. If you choose to live with your right posture, you don't have to go on a dark road or a malodorous place. Oyama
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez
  2. Mr. Donkeypenis is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/03/2003 2:40pm


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote: "Donkeypenis you don't have a clue either."

    Explain, FukFu. How am I wrong? This is what I learned in Eagle Boxing in Lawrenceville, Georgia. Many of the fighters there have pretty damn good amateur boxing, kickboxing, and MMA records. Where did you train? I'm not saying you don't know, but how am I wrong? Maybe you have learned the same thing but you don't understand my explanation.


    Better yet, maybe you live in the north Georgia area? My friend Russel (an ex-pro boxer and MMA fighter) and I could show you personally? Not a challenge, but to practice?

    A.K.A MEAT
  3. SRyuFighter is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/03/2003 4:10pm


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I take Seibukan Shorin ryu Karate and we do what is called a snap punch. You twist your fist at the very last second and you put it at a 45% angle.

    I owned you the minute you were born!
  4. FukFu is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/03/2003 7:42pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    9chambers, you don't have a clue.

    Donkeypenis you don't have a clue either.
    Sorry guys, I've been very stressed out from work the last few weeks.

    I just got home, so let me chill for a while and I will post back and try to be of some help.


    <marquee>I can kick the typical street fighter’s ass</marquee>
  5. Nihilanthic is offline

    Decafinated white belt.

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    Posted On:
    1/03/2003 8:16pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'd rather not try to explain this over a forum... and this is starting to look like a crossfire zone for flames over theory on punching.

    Jab, step forwards a bit with your lead leg, connect with the fist... small details about angle of your elbow I can't really get into, but it should NOT be straightened. Braced, but NOT 180°. A little bend is good, and you don't really lose any range with it. And of course, pull it back. Also do that "look down the barrel" trick to help cover your face. Sometimes my shoulder slaps my cheek when I do it. KEEP UP THE OTHER HAND.

    Cross, there are a few ways. Either push off of your rear leg, ball of the foot, or do the step-forwards, with the rear leg pushing, or even step with that leg with throwing the cross changing your stance. But, thats for setting up a combo with your kick most of the time. Look at what Chuck did to Babalu in UFC 40... (from left lead) Cross step cross left kick... depends on how far you are going to punch, how close you want to get to them. you NEED a trainer to show you, and some vids from K-1, boxing, and some MMA to see it as an example. Oh, by the way... its called a CROSS for a reason. Twisting your body and crossing that rear arm all the way past your body can put a lot of power and range into it.

    Regarding power in a punch - One way I like to think of it is that your arm is a conduit for transferring bodyweight, and while you straighten it into and through the target, your body twisting and your footwork are what generate it. If you have a bag or a adequate thing to punch, try this. Stand infront of the bag, and without moving your body at all, punch it with one arm. Then, straighten that arm (not to 180°, but braced) and move forwards and twist your body to contact the bag. There's a big difference. A good punch does BOTH. You can also try this with a hook. Lock your arm bent, and twist and contact. Compare that to sitting like a statue and using just your arm to hit them.

    You need a good trainer. In Person. This is the best I can do... hope it helps.

    <Me> John, what do you know about Zen Buddhism? <John> *smacks me*
    <John> I'd have to smack you sometime...
    Katana, on 540 kicks: "Hang from a ceiling fan with both hands. Flail your feet out and ask people to walk into you as you hit their face."
  6. FukFu is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/03/2003 9:05pm


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Once again I find myself in total agreement with Nihilanthic. Well not quite. 99% of the time a cross is thrown this way.

    Cross, there are a few ways. Either push off of your rear leg, ball of the foot


    or do the step-forwards, with the rear leg pushing, or even step with that leg with throwing the cross changing your stance.
    These are really specialty moves not suited for beginners.

    <marquee>I can kick the typical street fighter’s ass</marquee>
  7. Mr. Donkeypenis is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/03/2003 9:34pm


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I completely agree with Nihilantic. Thank`s for showing variations of footwork when throwing the cross as well.

    A.K.A MEAT
  8. Nihilanthic is offline

    Decafinated white belt.

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    Posted On:
    1/03/2003 11:44pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Its really about footwork and bodyweight I suppose. You need balance and mobility, and pushing your body forwards and using your arm to transmit it...

    And a cross, the step forwards with your lead leg is usually as part of the jab. I was referring to how to lead with a cross, or as a seperate technique if you were doing a broken rhythm. The Rear leg is pushing while you take the small step. The twisting of your body can add momentum too. Your arm needs to be able to convey that force, a lot more than just do all of it, itself. Try that exercise with just arm and then just body movement on a bag... and make sure your wrist and elbow is braced! By braced I mean stiff through muscle contraction, not a locked joint. That is very bad.

    I think that really analyzing what you do while you hit the bag can give you a LOT more comprehension when you try to apply techniques. Now this is not all there is, there is a LOT of complexity to punching. Get a good teacher!


    <Me> John, what do you know about Zen Buddhism? <John> *smacks me*
    <John> I'd have to smack you sometime...
    Katana, on 540 kicks: "Hang from a ceiling fan with both hands. Flail your feet out and ask people to walk into you as you hit their face."
  9. 9chambers

    Guest

    Posted On:
    1/03/2003 11:59pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    FukFu,


    I know what I am talking about. yooou are the dumb one. :P

    When I said that a cross gets its power from taking a step with the opposite foot I wasn't talking about a one-two combonation. If you were just going to throw one punch and it was a cross then you have to step with your oppostite foot. The cross by itself requires a step with your opposite foot.

    On the one-two its still that first step that sets up both punches. The whole reason they call it a CROSS punch is because it comes from the opposite side of your step. It goes across your body from the opposite side of your step.

    I am used to lunge punches and crosses thrown after a parry and whatnot so it didn't seem strange to me to think of a cross outside of the one-two combonation. Sorry, I should have made that clear. Look up some pictures of a cross punch. You will see that if its a right cross then the left foot is forward. Always.

    I didn't mean that all the power is generated from the step. You have to put your whole body into it. But if it doesn't "cross" your step then it isn't a "cross" punch.

    .. watch Rocky again ya little punk! :)
  10. 9chambers

    Guest

    Posted On:
    1/04/2003 12:42am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Brad Kohler's one punch KO in the UFC (as seen on the McBeatdowns download in the download section) is a cool example of a stand alone cross punch. I'm not the only person that has ever thrown one. You can't follow certain patterns when you get into boxing. You have to mix it up a little. Don't be predictable. Take your shots when you get them without worrying about proceedure.

    Not that the main use of a cross is a first punch. Jabs usually set it up yea ~ but like I said, the reason the cross has more power than the jab is because it comes from the opposite side of the step .. or the opposite side of the forward leg. More distance and more twist in the waist and shoulders = more power.

    Another way to use a cross:


    * Using the cross with the lunge: (from another thread)

    One-two combinations are standard because most fighters don't like to switch guards. The reason for this is that most people just aren't as coordinated or strong with the arm they use less or whatever. If you have more talent than that then switching guards is a great way to confuse your opponent and set up some different tactical combonations.

    One-two-three punch combos can set you up for a rear leg kick from your lead leg. Its my main way of switching guards or going from one side to the other. The key to three punch combonations is the
    lunge punch. Let me illustrate this for you:

    * Lead, cross, lunging lead cross, lead leg kick from revearse position.

    In other words, punch with your lead fist and then throw a cross with your other. Then take a step in with your other leg as you throw a cross with your lead fist. (That is the lunge, it closes distance fast and hard) .. Then your lead leg is back in the rear position ready for a powerful Muay Thai kick, a poking toe round kick to the groin, a rear leg front stamp, a side kick or whatever .. after the kick you will end up in your beggining stance.

    or you could do this instead if you don't feel like kicking ..

    Lead, cross, lunging lead cross, step across with your lead leg and hook with the other hand, step back with lead leg and throw a lead cross, then a lead leg front kick from the reverse position.

    ...

    Rear leg kicks are stronger .. particularly at close range .. moreso if its your lead leg in the rear position.

    I hope I covered what you were looking for, .. switching guards .. I used ambiguous terms for which arm is your lead because I am left handed. I often lead with my left for one-two-three combos. I lead with my right for one-two combos sometimes like following a parry.

    Another thing .. stepping across the body can give a hook punch the power of a cross.

    Hmm.. maybe this isn't what you were asking.. how do you go from a left hook to a right roundhouse directly? .. I'd say follow the left hook with a shove or a clinch and then go for the kick.

    ---




    >> Perhaps it was because I had an inherent skill for the science and never deviated from natural principles. - Miyamoto Musashi 1643
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