218358 Bullies, 6919 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 28
Page 1 of 3 1 23 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Balloonknot is offline

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    1,650

    Posted On:
    8/03/2004 1:39pm


     Style: lame

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    80% of my diet is protein. There is no danger of eating too much protein (unless you're eating a whole cow that is). Actually, the ultimate way to eat for optimum health is....

    Don't eat sugar - AT ALL!
    Don't eat white flour - especially white bread, bagels, etc.
    Don't eat pasta, and sugary sauces.
    Don't drink juice - It's pure sugar!
    Limit consumption of fruits and eat mainly strawberries and blueberries (highest nutrients and the lowest glycemic index). These particular fruits will not produce the "insulin shot" in your body if eaten in moderation.

    Basically, just eat meats, eggs, vegetables, salads, cheese, and nuts. As well as low-carb protein shakes and bars for quick on the run snacks.

    One should not eat more than 30/40 grams of carbohydrate a day if you need to loose weight.

    These are my recomendations. FWIW.
  2. ImAlrdyNum is offline
    ImAlrdyNum's Avatar

    aahhh...the colors

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    633

    Posted On:
    8/03/2004 2:21pm

    supporting member
     Style: Judo & Sub Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Follow the Zone diet. Good ****.
    Regardless, that doesn't change the fact that kickboxing is commonly known as fighting while grappling simply isn't. - Osiris
  3. Deadpan Scientist is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    8,303

    Posted On:
    8/03/2004 2:46pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The zone diet is complete ****.

    J Am Coll Nutr. 2003 Feb;22(1):9-17. Related Articles, Links
    Click here to read
    The Zone Diet phenomenon: a closer look at the science behind the claims.

    Cheuvront SN.

    U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Maine 01760, USA. samuel.cheuvront@na.amedd.army.mil

    The purported health benefits of low-carbohydrate diets have been advocated intermittently over the last century and have enjoyed increasing popularity over the last decade. Although most revolve around the emphatic theme that carbohydrates are to blame for many chronic diseases, their specific ideologies are more variable and in some cases quite sophisticated. The Zone Diet phenomenon represents a new generation of modern low carbohydrate food fad with sales placing it among the most popular diet books in recent history. The Zone is a 40% carbohydrate, 30% protein and 30% fat eating plan that advocates only sparing use of grains and starches. The precise 0.75 protein to carbohydrate ratio required with each meal is promoted to reduce the insulin to glucagon ratio, which purportedly affects eicosanoid metabolism and ultimately produces a cascade of biological events leading to a reduction in chronic disease risk, enhanced immunity, maximal physical and mental performance, increased longevity and permanent weight loss. There is presently little scientific support for the connections made between diet, endocrinology and eicosanoid metabolism. In fact, a review of the literature suggests that there are scientific contradictions in the Zone Diet hypothesis that cast unquestionable doubt on its potential efficacy. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the scientific merit of the Zone Diet and its health claims in an effort to help delineate what is and what is not sound nutrition science.
  4. Deadpan Scientist is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    8,303

    Posted On:
    8/03/2004 2:47pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    BTW balloonknot, that's a seriously retarded diet.
  5. CaptShady is offline
    CaptShady's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,462

    Posted On:
    8/03/2004 2:55pm


     Style: Beverly Hills Ninjitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Study: Low-Carb Diet More Effective Than Low-Fat Diet

    Low-carb dieters lost more body fat and improved cholesterol profiles
    May 17, 2004 - (Durham, NC) - (Duke) People who followed a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet lost more weight than people on a low-fat, low-cholesterol, low-calorie diet during a six-month comparison study at Duke University Medical Center. However, the researchers caution that people with medical conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure should not start the diet without close medical supervision.
    "This diet can be quite powerful," said lead researcher Will Yancy, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center and a research associate at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Durham, N.C. "We found that the low-carb diet was more effective for weight loss," Yancy added. "The weight loss surprised me, to be honest with you. We also found cholesterol levels seemed to improve more on a low-carb diet compared to a low-fat diet."

    The study is the first randomized, controlled trial of an Atkins-style diet approach, which includes vitamin and nutritional supplements. Along with losing an average of 26 pounds, dieters assigned to the low-carbohydrate plan lost more body fat, and lowered their triglyceride levels and raised their HDL, or good cholesterol, more than the low-fat dieters. The low-fat dieters lost an average of 14 pounds. Though the low-fat diet group lowered their total cholesterol more than the low-carb dieters, the latter group nearly halved their triglycerides and their HDL jumped five points. The low-carbohydrate group reported more adverse physical effects, such as constipation and headaches, but fewer people dropped out of the low-carbohydrate diet than the low-fat diet.

    The results appear in the May 18, 2004, issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. The research was funded by an unrestricted grant from the Robert C. Atkins Foundation. The study authors have no financial interest in Atkins Nutritionals, Inc.

    The study builds on earlier results by the Duke University Medical Center researchers showing a low-carbohydrate diet can lead to weight loss -- the first study of the low carbohydrate diet since 1980. Yancy and co-investigator Eric Westman, M.D., are currently testing whether a low-carbohydrate diet can help diabetics control their blood sugar levels.

    Despite the considerable weight loss experienced by the low-carbohydrate dieters, Yancy does not recommend an Atkins-style plan for patients attempting to lose weight for the first time.

    "Over six months the diet appears relatively safe, but we need to study the safety for longer durations," Yancy said. He also cautioned that the diet could present certain health risks, such as elevations in LDL cholesterol levels, bone loss, or kidney stones. This and other recent studies of the low-carbohydrate diet have not demonstrated that these health risks occur over short durations, but they might occur in people on the diet for long-term. It is especially important that people on diuretic or diabetes medications be monitored by a doctor because the low-carbohydrate diet affects hydration and blood sugar levels, Yancy said.

    The 120 study participants were randomly assigned to either the low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet or the low-fat, low-cholesterol, low-calorie diet. All were between 18 and 65 years old and in generally good health, with a body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 60, indicating obesity, and a total cholesterol level of more than 200 mg/dL. None had tried dieting or weight loss pills in the previous six months.

    The low-carbohydrate group was permitted daily unlimited amounts of animal foods [such as] meat, fowl, fish and shellfish; unlimited eggs; 4 oz. of hard cheese; two cups of salad vegetables such as lettuce, spinach or celery; and one cup of low-carbohydrate vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower or squash. They also received daily nutritional supplements recommended by Atkins -- a multivitamin, essential oils, a diet formulation and chromium picolinate. There were no restrictions on total calories, but carbohydrates were kept below 20 grams per day at the start of the diet.

    The low-fat, low-cholesterol, low-calorie group followed a diet consisting of less than 30 percent of daily caloric intake from fat; less than 10 percent of calories from saturated fat; and less than 300 milligrams of cholesterol daily. They were also advised to cut back on calories. The recommended daily calorie level was 500 to 1,000 calories less than the participant's maintenance diet -- the calories needed to maintain current weight.

    Study participants were encouraged to exercise 30 minutes at least three times per week, but no formal exercise program was provided. Both sets of dieters had group meetings at an outpatient research clinic regularly for six months.

    Others members of the Duke research team were Maren Olsen, Ph.D.; John Guyton, M.D.; Ronna Bakst, R.D.; and Eric Westman, M.D., who was co-principal investigator for the study. The researchers maintained exclusive control of all data and analyses.

    Source
  6. Dochter is offline

    Neutral, or nearly so

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    8,050

    Posted On:
    8/03/2004 2:59pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If I recall correctly after six months there was no difference and the low-calorie diet actually resulted in more prolonged reduced weights.
  7. Mediocrates is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Posts
    340

    Posted On:
    8/03/2004 3:16pm


     Style: Fabio Santos BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There is also a HUGE difference between loss of weight and loss of fat. One of the main reasons that low-carb approaches show immediate WEIGHT loss is due to a depletion of glycogen stores. This process causes shedding of water associated with that glycogen, which is why people can see numbers like 10lbs in 2 weeks...something completely unreasonable if it were mostly bodyfat.

    Villification of any macronutrient is a flawed approach to healthy eating and body composition changes.
  8. Deadpan Scientist is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    8,303

    Posted On:
    8/03/2004 3:18pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by Mediocrates
    Villification of any macronutrient is a flawed approach to healthy eating and body composition changes.
    I love you.
  9. CaptShady is offline
    CaptShady's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,462

    Posted On:
    8/03/2004 3:21pm


     Style: Beverly Hills Ninjitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by Mediocrates
    There is also a HUGE difference between loss of weight and loss of fat. One of the main reasons that low-carb approaches show immediate WEIGHT loss is due to a depletion of glycogen stores. This process causes shedding of water associated with that glycogen, which is why people can see numbers like 10lbs in 2 weeks...something completely unreasonable if it were mostly bodyfat.

    Villification of any macronutrient is a flawed approach to healthy eating and body composition changes.
    Practically all diets have initial water shedding in the beginning phases.
  10. Deadpan Scientist is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    8,303

    Posted On:
    8/03/2004 3:23pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Capt, did you make an appointment with an RD yet?
Page 1 of 3 1 23 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.