Page 2 of 5 First 12345 Last
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    251
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Shrugs are good for the tie in between the shoulders and upper pecs.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    SLC, ut (one day, years from now, a doctor will tell me i have an iq of 45, and am what some people may call, mentally retarded
    Posts
    210
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I only have free weights, a bar, a rack, my weights, and some dumbells...what could I do with these that would be similar to the smith's machine routine?

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    SLC, ut (one day, years from now, a doctor will tell me i have an iq of 45, and am what some people may call, mentally retarded
    Posts
    210
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    what about "skull crusher's" with a curlbar?

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Cheeseland
    Posts
    1,177
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Skull crushers hit your tris. You could do some presses with the dumbells, sit up as if to do military style, then scoot your butt forward about 5 or 6 inches. (You will need something to lean back against.) Then press straight up.
    Is Wayne Brady gonna have to choke a bitch?

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Posts
    340
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Perhaps you should worry about individual sections of bodyparts after you've doubled your strength and added a good 30lbs of muscle mass to your body as a whole. It never ceases to amaze me how particular people will get before even considering the big picture.

    And for the love of lumbar, arching your back on your chest movements? If you want to do an incline press, do an incline press. Don't contort an overhead press into a dangerous half-breed press. It is illogical to alter the movement to stress the lower back...as this is not part of the musculature intended for the movement. On top of that, arching of one's back during a incline/flat/decline chest press movement inhibits range of motion (the torso is now closer to the bar/handles).

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sherdog's Strength and power forum
    Posts
    121
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by SuperSport28405
    I get in the smith rack sitting on a bench with a mid back support. Instead of keeping you torso perpendicular as you would with military presses, slide your butt forward on the bench about 4 inches or so. Then arch your back a little against the back support of the bench. Bring the bar down to just under your clavicle. Experiment around a little with your grip width and the angle of your torso.
    Because of the limited range of motion and forced direction of movement I DO NOT reccomend the smith machine... at all... ever. Since you don't have an incline bench I would reccomend military press (not behind the neck) until you can buy one. Beyond that I wouldn't reccomend doing military press on a regular basis if you do any kind of serious MA or MMA training cause it puts your shoulders in a VERY comprimised position.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Carolina Beach, NC
    Posts
    119
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by Mediocrates
    Perhaps you should worry about individual sections of bodyparts after you've doubled your strength and added a good 30lbs of muscle mass to your body as a whole. It never ceases to amaze me how particular people will get before even considering the big picture.

    And for the love of lumbar, arching your back on your chest movements? If you want to do an incline press, do an incline press. Don't contort an overhead press into a dangerous half-breed press. It is illogical to alter the movement to stress the lower back...as this is not part of the musculature intended for the movement. On top of that, arching of one's back during a incline/flat/decline chest press movement inhibits range of motion (the torso is now closer to the bar/handles).
    Sorry my friend, but I disagree. Arching the spine during pressing movents such as flat bench or incline bench will work the pecs harder.

    I learned this technique a decade ago from a champion powerlifter-use your pecs, they are much bigger and stronger than the delts or tri's, and get the weight moving in the bottom of the excercise where it is most critical.

    Also-the press (for flat bench) should start at the sternum and the bar should arc so that it finishes over the eyes.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    8,046
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by SuperSport28405
    Also-the press (for flat bench) should start at the sternum and the bar should arc so that it finishes over the eyes.
    Why would you ever use the smith (aka ****) machine then?

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Posts
    340
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Arching the spine during pressing movents such as flat bench or incline bench will work the pecs harder.
    It does nothing of the sort. It DOES give you more favorable leverage and positioning in order to lift more WEIGHT via assistance from unrelated parts of the body.

    I learned this technique a decade ago from a champion powerlifter-use your pecs, they are much bigger and stronger than the delts or tri's, and get the weight moving in the bottom of the excercise where it is most critical.
    Arching your back does exactly as I said it does - it reduces your range of motion. By arching, your chest MUST follow the arch upward/forward. This means you lose that range of motion. It may only be a few inches, but that's also the most difficult range in a pressing movement. You "get the weight moving" because you are compromising good form in order to lift a weight you are incapable of otherwise. Strength training is about developing strength safely through a full range of motion, not demonstrating it by any means necessary.

    We do agree on something. In a pressing movement, you should use your pectoral muscles (as if we can opt out?), not your lower back...not your hips. The only movement should be at the shoulder and elbow. Any other movement means you aren't ready for that weight, you can't perform a repetition in good form....or both.


    However, it is nice to see people acknowledging how horrible Smith machines are for....anything.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    4,012
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    only puny men who don't use the incline bench think that there is no difference between different parts of the chest.

Page 2 of 5 First 12345 Last

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO