1. #1
    BKR's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Florida: Serial Killers, Black Bears, and Invasive Species, and Global Sea Level Rise

    I'm thinking as global sea level rises, things are going to get even scarier in Florida. Less room to live, Miami under water, and all those non-native critters getting crowded out by desperate humans.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-u...0ID2LP20141024
    October 24, 2014 / 4:45 PM / 3 years ago
    [h=Florida man shoots 400-pound bear breaking into his house
    ORLANDO Fla. (Reuters) - A Florida man shot and killed a 400-pound (180-kg) black bear after it broke into his house two nights in a row to get to a bag of dog food, a state wildlife officer said on Friday.]1[/h]“I felt in danger enough that since it wouldn’t leave I had to shoot it,” said Victor Peters of Lady Lake of the Wednesday night incident in a video interview posted online by the Orlando Sentinel.

    Killing a bear in Florida is illegal. Wildlife officer Greg Workman of the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation said he expects to hand the case to prosecutors by early next week for their consideration at the completion of his investigation.


    [h=Wild monkeys roaming Florida and breeding like, well, monkeys]1[/h]https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...ngs/103830122/
    ORLANDO – It’s not quite Planet of the Apes.

    But bands of feral rhesus macaque monkeys are roaming Central Florida, scaring families with their aggressive behavior, making homes in suburban backyards and puzzling wildlife officials who struggle to curb their growing numbers.

    The latest monkey-to-people encounter occurred last month, when several of the monkeys charged a family vacationing in Silver Springs State Park, about 75 miles northwest of Orlando. A cell phone video of the monkey business, captured by a family member, is spreading through various social media sites.


    [h=As pythons invade Florida, professional snake hunting becomes booming industry]1[/h]Rayce, I do believe this is an opportunity for you to move on from your current profession ! Finally, a grappling challenge worthy of your skill and attitude !
    http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/...-industry.html

    In a state known more for its alligators, there is a new job title: Pro python hunter.

    An estimated 100,000 pythons are living in and ravaging Florida’s Everglades. They will eat 160 animals in five years and have no enemies.
    Even alligators are no match for the Burmese python. A 13-footer caught and killed recently had three baby deer in its belly.


    [h=One solution to Florida's wild pig problem: Eat them]1[/h]http://www.tampabay.com/things-to-do...t-them/2203562

    PUNTA GORDA — When life hands you nuisance pigs, make pork chops.

    And since Florida has an estimated 1 million feral pigs — the most in the country per square mile — Charlotte County rancher Keith Mann saw an opportunity to capitalize on that idea in a novel way.

    He has established a working relationship with trappers, USDA inspectors and the restaurant community to bring this new "naturally raised," "free-range," "sustainable" and "local" food source to market. Already presiding over Florida's largest bison herd at his Three Suns Ranch, Mann launched his feral pig program this spring, a win-win for homeowners, trappers and restaurant patrons alike. The only losers are the pigs.
    Opportunistic omnivores, the pigs breed swiftly, squeeze out other wildlife and wreak havoc on golf courses, agricultural land and even backyard sod. Roaming in all 67 counties of the state, they have been trapped and hunted for decades. There is no season, no size or bag limits or restrictions on harvesting either gender — all this has made wild pigs the second most popular hunted wildlife in the state behind white-tailed deer.

    And the rogue's gallery of invasive species in Florida (not to mention the non-native but not considered invasive ones).
    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/...togallery.html
    http://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/no...asive-species/

    A nonnative species could become invasive soon after becoming established, like the Cuban tree frog. It was introduced in 1931 through packing materials, and has invaded Florida's natural areas, preying on our native tree frogs. Cuban tree frogs rapidly spread in south Florida and were common throughout most of the state by the 1970's.
    On the other hand, it might take years for the right factors to fall into place to allow a species to expand its range and cause ecological problems. For example, green iguanas have resided in Florida since the 1960's, but their population has increased greatly since Hurricane Andrew. Although green iguanas have not had ecological impacts, this Central and South American lizard causes significant economic damage to landscape plants, primarily in Miami-Dade and Broward Counties. On Florida's west coast, black spinytail iguanas have reached such abundance that many residents view them as a nuisance, and the town of Boca Grande has considered hiring trappers to remove them.
    Some invasive animals do not cause problems in all areas. The nutria, a large rodent from South America, lives in warm, marshy areas. It is abundant in the lowlands of Louisiana and Mississippi, but Florida populations have not been very successful even though Florida has similar habitats to other Gulf Coast states.

    And last but not least, serial killers. On a population-adjusted (I assume that's per-capita), Florida is ranked #3 on the list I found.
    https://www.salon.com/2017/10/30/pol...e-creeped-out/
    https://www.ranker.com/list/worst-se.../cat-mcauliffe

    [h=Multiple deaths in this Tampa neighborhood has everyone on the lookout for this possible person of interest]2[/h]
    A spate of recent deaths in Florida one Tampa Bay neighborhood shook. A new video released by the Tampa Police Department did not help ease residents' fears.

    Investigators released surveillance footage from the night of one of the murders. The video shows a person of interest walking in the area of where Benjamin Mitchell, 22, was shot.


    And finally, global sea level rise.
    http://geology.com/sea-level-rise/florida.shtml

    I took a look at the 2013 IPCC figures on estimated range of sea level rise in 21st century.
    Max is .8 meters. Call it 1 meter in round numbers, LOL. That's 3.28 feet for non-literate in SI.
    https://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/unfccc/cop19...ory13sbsta.pdf
    Falling for Judo since 1980

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  2. #2
    submessenger's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yeah, Florida has all sorts of invasive species. Retired New Yorkers and Canadians top the list. You're not allowed to humanely exterminate them, but many other species you can. Iguanas, cuban tree frogs, pythons, and all sorts of vegetation, too. Always had me wondering at what point you stop considering them invasive and just call them part of the current ecology.

    The bear thing, they should try a Zimmerman defense. It worked, once...

    (edit) I'm trying to find the link, but at least one species it's recommended (by FWC or another state agency, or maybe it was one of the Universities) that you bag it and throw it in the freezer. I think it was the cuban tree frog. Anyways, the point being that extermination is encouraged in many cases. The annual Python contest is another good example.

    The pigs are pretty good eats, I had an employee that would get one about once a year and split it with me. They are definitely gamier than domestic pork, though, so maybe not in everyone's culinary interest.

  3. #3
    Diesel_tke's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh yeah, we hunt pig year around. You can kill them under any circumstance, night time, day time, shining lights, bait them, trap them, whatever. I love some wild hog, too. Otherwise, yeah they are going to have to open up a season on snow birds otherwise the population is going to get out of control.
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  4. #4
    BKR's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by submessenger View Post
    Yeah, Florida has all sorts of invasive species. Retired New Yorkers and Canadians top the list. You're not allowed to humanely exterminate them, but many other species you can. Iguanas, cuban tree frogs, pythons, and all sorts of vegetation, too. Always had me wondering at what point you stop considering them invasive and just call them part of the current ecology.

    The bear thing, they should try a Zimmerman defense. It worked, once...

    (edit) I'm trying to find the link, but at least one species it's recommended (by FWC or another state agency, or maybe it was one of the Universities) that you bag it and throw it in the freezer. I think it was the cuban tree frog. Anyways, the point being that extermination is encouraged in many cases. The annual Python contest is another good example.

    The pigs are pretty good eats, I had an employee that would get one about once a year and split it with me. They are definitely gamier than domestic pork, though, so maybe not in everyone's culinary interest.
    Well, at least one invasive Texan has left Florida recently...
    Falling for Judo since 1980

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  5. #5

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    When i think florida+sea level rise. I think gators moving in next door to people.

  6. #6
    BKR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kravbizarre View Post
    When i think florida+sea level rise. I think gators moving in next door to people.
    I do believe that is already very common...
    Falling for Judo since 1980

    "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

    "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

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  7. #7
    submessenger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    I do believe that is already very common...
    Yeah, it is. Where I was, Palm Beach County, gators were everywhere. In some places, so common that you don't even notice them. For example, I had an office (which was, coincidentally, right next door to the American Media building, where the anthrax happened) that had a large pond in back for irrigation/reclamation. It was inhabited by gators, property management had signs up all over the place "don't feed the alligators." We used to eat lunch and inhale large amounts of nicotine-infested smoke while watching the gators laze around, just yards away.

    (edit)


    Personally, never had this happen (i.e. not my pic), but definitely not surprising. Also, technically, this picture represents something potentially illegal - homes with pools are supposed to have fences that would presumably keep out young children.
    http://activerain.com/blogsview/2195...unny-florida--
    http://www.myfwc.com/media/152524/al...r-brochure.pdf

  8. #8

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Lol wow, here in australia that image would of made the news (our news is always filled with crap cos they have nothing better to report). We have crocodiles here though (salt water and fresh water breeds). Saw one at the aquarium 2 years ago, thing was just over 10m long. It was huge fucker. Watched it during the feeding session. If they see food they come out of the water pretty quick despite their size.

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