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  1. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by AcerTempest View Post
    My German is terrible, so I won't even try to type it, but essentially the concept is that rather than waiting for an incoming attack you should launch an attack on such an angle that it both strikes your opponent and defends you from his blade at the same time. For example, if my opponent strikes a downward blow from right to left, attempting to cleave me in two, I can strike a similar downward blow to the center line of combat, creating a defense for my self and, depending upon our relative depths, threaten my opponent with either a cut or thrust in the same tempo.

    I will try and get a good video and link it tonight or tomorrow.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jp9KUlRhvc

    Here is a, well not great actually, but ok video of the zornhau being used to cut in to an oberhau in light sparring. It illustrates the concept anyway.

  2. #82
    BKR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moenstah View Post
    So not smelling of fish, but doodoo?
    Unlike, hakama, zubon are easy to get down.
    Falling for Judo since 1980

    "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

    "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

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  3. #83
    Diesel_tke's Avatar
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    When I initially started training in stick and knife fighting, my instructor was from a JMA background. He had all kinds of names for stuff that I don't remember because we eventually only cared how it came out in sparring. When parrying, it was done always with the edge of the sword for a few reasons. One depending on the block, it was done at an angle so that the sword slides along the edge away from you. It was always done while using footwork to angle away from the opponent (by away I mean not toward the opponent. So you could be moving forward but it would be at a 45 degree angle to the side to get inside his reach. You could angle back but if you do, you would be immediately circling). Another reason was because roof blocks have your secondary hand behind the edge to reinforce the block so it doesn't come back on you. This done differently if you had a second sword or smaller dagger. All of this changed drastically between the type of sword if it was two hand or single hand. And then length. But the footwork was the same. Then we got into Filipino style as we worked toward stick. This was different as we now focused on machete length.

    But we only did sword work a little and then moved more toward stick and knife for more practical applications.
    Combatives training log.

    Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

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  4. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel_tke View Post
    All of this changed drastically between the type of sword if it was two hand or single hand.
    oh that's interesting, in what sense did it change?

  5. #85
    Diesel_tke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moenstah View Post
    oh that's interesting, in what sense did it change?
    We trained with a bunch of different types of swords, from long to short which also changes the weight and balance of the sword. So when you performed a roof block for instance. If the sword is in the right hand and you are blocking from an overhand right, the sword goes up and the left hand goes behind the sword to support the blade while you are stepping through at an angle. If it is a two handed sword you won't be putting the non dominant hand up to support the blade as it is already on there. If you are using a sword that has an edge on both sides you obviously won't be putting the hand up there to support that blade. But even if it is single edge, if it is significantly longer and heavier, your movements are larger and your distancing is different. So, you do a roof block and angle, you are going to be stepping further out or binding up, which changes the game all up.

    If you are fighting with a sword and knife, you will be changing the variation, or stick and knife as you will still be able to support that blade but you have different options for evasion and counters. Getting on the inside of that arc is beneficial to the shorter bladed weapon. Then you also have the krabi, which we used a lot also. The style is a little different already because you have the edges and points pointed toward the opponent. And you are using two blades. You still have a similar roof block involved with a supporting role of the second blade but you are not angling off all the time as you will be putting tepe kicks into the mix on these exchanges. This involves a blending of the footwork and completely different focus. Then you have such a long hilt sticking out, you have the option of using punyos, disarms, and clench work with them. But those are pretty weird when they are so long, it's interesting to see what comes out in sparring.

    Then if you get the length of sword down to machete and knife length, everything becomes so much smaller and quicker that you start throwing roof blocks out all together. I don't do much roof blocks when I fight with knives because if you raise your arms up that high you are going to get countered and stuck in the body really easily. So footwork and evasion is stressed more and striking at the hands or defanging the snake. But when we train knife, the sparring doesn't last very long. We don't use much padding and let you keep going after getting hit as it is less realistic. So you would reset and go again.

    So different but the same. I know when I was fighting with machete length swords and went to knife it was like entering a whole different world where it seemed like I had no experience. But then after a while, things slow down in your mind and you see where the similarities are and differences are. But then you switch back to longer blades and it feels totally different again.

    And then when everything is getting comfortable a Kasarigama is brought out and really screws up your game. I don't like fighting with one, but countering one gets really fun.
    Combatives training log.

    Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

    Drum thread

    Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you “cardio without the dishonour of aerobics”.

  6. #86

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    that's a nice post, thanks! Not sure if I'm looking forward to the kusarigama.

  7. #87
    Diesel_tke's Avatar
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    It is a really unique weapon to fight against. Depending on the way the wielder uses it, some like to swing the weighted end around to get momentum or just to keep it moving. So you can try to time the swings to get inside. But if you do this, and it still makes contact, it can swing around your blocking weapon and smack you in the face. :) My instructor was able to use his other hand to stop the swing and make it back swing. That sucks when you thing you are timing it past the swing and then all the sudden it's right back at you. And then their are varying lengths. That causes all kinds of weirdness. Sometimes they don't keep a swing going and just leave it hanging, to do a quick swing at you catching you off guard. Then, say you block and get on the inside, you now are out of position for the other end of it which they will be using to strike with.

    It's a mess. But lots of fun. :)
    Combatives training log.

    Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

    Drum thread

    Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you “cardio without the dishonour of aerobics”.

  8. #88

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    Did he do any koryu? if so, which ryu? Once saw a very nice demo by a very good shinto muso ryu practioner, he knew how to handle a kusarigama. I'm so crap even with a jo that I don't even bother trying kusarigama yet.

  9. #89
    Diesel_tke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moenstah View Post
    Did he do any koryu? if so, which ryu? Once saw a very nice demo by a very good shinto muso ryu practioner, he knew how to handle a kusarigama. I'm so crap even with a jo that I don't even bother trying kusarigama yet.
    He did with his instructor but I'm not sure about the details. Once I was training with him, everything was taught through sparring. Very non-traditional. We did various drills and then applied them immediately to sparring. If it didn't come out in sparring then he threw it out.
    Combatives training log.

    Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

    Drum thread

    Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you “cardio without the dishonour of aerobics”.

  10. #90
    Bneterasedmynam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AcerTempest View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jp9KUlRhvc

    Here is a, well not great actually, but ok video of the zornhau being used to cut in to an oberhau in light sparring. It illustrates the concept anyway.
    I have had better luck with thrusts for that type of counter. With the proper angle it's almost like a free hit.

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