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  1. #321
    W. Rabbit's Avatar
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    Arabs have been good at math and science for a long, long time.
    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    Yep, those backward Saudi are moving forward to become independent of the old black gold. http://www.foxbusiness.com/politics/...rmal-life.html http://www.foxbusiness.com/features/...ast-facts.html Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman announced on Tuesday plans to build a new city of the future, promising to usher in a progressive generation that will reshape the Middle Eastern country as it seeks to prepare for the post-oil age. NEOM: City of the Future The future city, named “NEOM”, stems from Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030 plan, a strategy created to reduce the country’s dependence on oil. NEOM, which will be located on the coast of the Red Sea, will span more than 10,000 square miles (26,500 square kilometers), extending across the borders of Egypt and Jordanian, making it the “first special economic zone to span three countries,” according to Saudi Crown Price Mohammed bin Salman. The city will focus on nine sectors, “some conventional, some new” to capture a “good share in the future of the world” he said during a panel discussion in Riyadh hosted by FOX Business Network’s Maria Bartiromo.

  2. #322

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    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    Arabs have been good at math and science for a long, long time.
    Yet no one knows how the number of 72 virgins came to be =P

    This dude will orobably get killed off or this city of the future will be an empty place with the only population being wealthy people. This technology will be available to the rest of the world if its the way of the future. Technically a tent city in a desert is carbon neutral too.

  3. #323
    BKR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    Arabs have been good at math and science for a long, long time.
    Yes even I know without looking it up algebra concept of zero Etc.

    And algebra is actually a contraction of an Arabic word right
    Falling for Judo since 1980

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  4. #324

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    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    That book is covert satire of the Borgias. It's not intended to be taken literally. You might not understand that if you haven't studied Machiavelli completely, but it's a common mistake to make.
    Untrue. It's Mac V's attempt to suck up to the Borgias as he was in the doghouse something fierce when he wrote it.

  5. #325

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    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    That book is covert satire of the Borgias. It's not intended to be taken literally. You might not understand that if you haven't studied Machiavelli completely, but it's a common mistake to make.
    In the light of the political views expressed in his (real) main work Discorsi, his own personal views and feelings, and the historical situation of the time, it is rather a real attempt to give an idea how a political figure could unify Italy, give legal certainty to the civil society and - in the long run - provide transition to a republic system. His political writings were all about installing an Italian Republic that contains all the little principalities, but the adressees of this text clearly are the powerful princes themselves.

    Yes, it may implicitly include a critical stance towards the Borgias, sometimes even a cynical one in its formulations. In the end, they kind of worsened the situation through their scheming (hiring Swiss troops and all that ****), but reading The Prince in the light of his satiric and theatrical work instead of the above mentioned aspects would be ill-taken imho. It would be belittling the real intake it had in history (e.g. for Frederic II of Prussia).

    See e.g. Viroli, Maurizio (2014): Redeeming The Prince, Princeton University Press, p.1:

    Republicans can surely learn from
    The Prince precious pieces of political wisdom, but there is
    no question that Machiavelli’s text is neither a satire of the
    prince nor does it embody any sort of oblique or cryptic
    message. He seriously wanted to instruct a new prince, a
    special sort of new prince, as I shall explain later.
    Btw., you should be careful to allege a trained philosopher of not knowing his subject.

  6. #326
    BackFistMonkey's Avatar
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    "Trump’s choice for No. 2 at EPA admitted he saw coal baron’s action plan to dismantle agency
    Lobbyist attended meetings on Rick Perry proposal to subsidize coal plants."


    President Donald Trump’s nominee for deputy administrator at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) admitted he viewed a plan developed by a top coal producer to roll back environmental regulations at the agency and attended meetings on Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s proposal to subsidize coal and nuclear plants.

    Testifying at his confirmation hearing Wednesday before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, Andrew Wheeler said Murray Energy was one of his lobbying clients while working at the law firm Faegre Baker Daniels. But Wheeler said he de-registered himself as a Murray Energy lobbyist in August.

    Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), in his questioning of Wheeler, said Robert Murray, the head of Murray Energy, “has said that he has a three-page plan that is being implemented by Scott Pruitt at the EPA. He said they’re already through the first page.”

    Wheeler, who previously worked on the staff of a top congressional climate science denier, Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK), acknowledged seeing a copy of Murray’s “action plan” earlier this year. Murray said he provided the plan to Trump in January to help the struggling coal industry. “I did not work on that [plan] or have a copy of that memo,” Wheeler said. “I saw it briefly at the beginning of year but don’t have possession of it. I looked at it.”

    Whitehouse contended it’s significant if the CEO of a coal company “has given his regulator a three-page plan” and “takes credit for having gotten through the first page of it already.”

    With Wheeler’s nomination, “We have a candidate for deputy administrator who said he’s seen it and can confirm it exists. I think the American people are entitled to an EPA that is not following a coal company’s three-page plan but is following wherever the best interests of the American people lead,” Whitehouse said.

    Since Trump took office, Murray has repeatedly met with administration officials, including at least three times with EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. Murray has also met with Perry, whom Murray pressed for an executive order to keep coal plants from closing.

    Wheeler told the Senate panel that he met with the Department of Energy on behalf of Murray a few months ago about Perry’s proposal to subsidize coal and nuclear plants. He said he also participated in a Capitol Hill meeting on the proposal, which Perry sent to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for implementation.

    Politico reported Monday that Perry’s proposal to change the nation’s electricity markets would provide a windfall for a small group of companies, including Murray Energy. The narrowly written plan would mostly aid power plants in a part of the Midwest and Northeast where Murray Energy is the primary coal supplier, according to Politico.
    Article is sourced and continues in detail.

    TLDR: EPA is currently following a plan written by the coal industry and hidden from public view.
    Quote Originally Posted by ghost55 View Post
    Violence is pretty uncommon in clubs in this area, and the dude didn't seem particularly hostile up until the moment he slapped me.
    “I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.”
    BILL HICKS,
    1961-1994

    Quote Originally Posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    Slamming the man in the bottom position from time to time keeps everybody on their toes and discourages butt scooting stupidity.

  7. #327
    Bneterasedmynam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
    "Trump’s choice for No. 2 at EPA admitted he saw coal baron’s action plan to dismantle agency
    Lobbyist attended meetings on Rick Perry proposal to subsidize coal plants."




    Article is sourced and continues in detail.

    TLDR: EPA is currently following a plan written by the coal industry and hidden from public view.
    How exactly is that not 100% illegal?? At the very least it has to be against that agencies ethics rules.

  8. #328
    BackFistMonkey's Avatar
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    "Industrial Strength: How the U.S. Government Hid Fracking's Risks to Drinking Water
    A pivotal EPA study provided the rationale for exemptions that helped unleash the fracking boom. The science was suppressed to protect industry interests."

    https://insideclimatenews.org/news/1...er-bush-cheney

    ...
    For Latkanich and all those who believe their water has been tainted by fracking, there are few remedies. Congress took away the most powerful one in 2005, prohibiting the Environmental Protection Agency from safeguarding drinking water that might be harmed by fracking and even denying the regulator the authority to find out what chemicals companies use. That provision of the Energy Policy Act was justified by an EPA study about fracking into coalbed methane reservoirs, completed under the George W. Bush administration, that concluded that fracking posed no risk to drinking water.

    Concerns about the study emerged from the outset, including a 2004 whistleblower complaint that called it "scientifically unsound." Now, InsideClimate News has learned that the scientists who wrote the report disagreed with the conclusion imposed by the Bush EPA, saying there was not enough evidence to support it. The authors, who worked for a government contractor, went so far as to have their company's name and their own removed from the final document.

    At EPA, "there was a preconceived conclusion that there's no risk associated with hydraulic fracturing into coalbed methane. That finding made its way into the Energy Policy Act, but with broader implications," said Chi Ho Sham, the group manager of a team of scientists and engineers for The Cadmus Group, the Massachusetts firm hired to do the report. "What we would have said in the conclusion is that there is some form of risk from hydraulic fracturing to groundwater. How you quantify it would require further analyses, but, in general, there is some risk."

    The fracking provision, widely known as the Halliburton loophole, after the oilfield services company once run by Bush's vice president, Dick Cheney, is among a host of exemptions to federal pollution rules that Congress and successive administrations have given oil and gas companies over the last 40 years.
    ...
    Article is sourced and fairly well written and continues in great detail.
    Quote Originally Posted by ghost55 View Post
    Violence is pretty uncommon in clubs in this area, and the dude didn't seem particularly hostile up until the moment he slapped me.
    “I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.”
    BILL HICKS,
    1961-1994

    Quote Originally Posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    Slamming the man in the bottom position from time to time keeps everybody on their toes and discourages butt scooting stupidity.

  9. #329
    Bneterasedmynam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
    "Industrial Strength: How the U.S. Government Hid Fracking's Risks to Drinking Water
    A pivotal EPA study provided the rationale for exemptions that helped unleash the fracking boom. The science was suppressed to protect industry interests."

    https://insideclimatenews.org/news/1...er-bush-cheney


    Article is sourced and fairly well written and continues in great detail.
    What the **** are you doing?? Everyone knows corporations can't hurt our drinking water. Are you trying to win one of submessengers tags??

  10. #330
    BKR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
    "Industrial Strength: How the U.S. Government Hid Fracking's Risks to Drinking Water
    A pivotal EPA study provided the rationale for exemptions that helped unleash the fracking boom. The science was suppressed to protect industry interests."

    https://insideclimatenews.org/news/1...er-bush-cheney


    Article is sourced and fairly well written and continues in great detail.
    Yeah, there are some risks to drinking water from fracing operations. There are a ****-ton of precautions taken to avoid them, too, whether it's coalbed methane, or tight gas/oil reservoirs (for example, North Dakota).

    State agencies have regulations as well regarding fracing, and any sort of well -drilling (for hydrocarbons). The Feds alone are not involved, unless maybe it's a federal lease.

    Normal drilling fluids can contaminate groundwater (aquifers) if something goes wrong, let alone the stuff they use in fracing.

    Oh, and fracking has been going on for decades.
    Falling for Judo since 1980

    "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

    "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

    "Banning BKR is like kicking a Quokka. It's foolishness of the first order." - Raycetpfl

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