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  1. #121
    Raycetpfl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    The popular vote gap for Clinton in CA alone was significantly more than the gap for the entire nation.
    That seems to support the notion of the EC to me.
    Both ways have their shitty parts but majority rules seems to make the most sense to me.

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wounded Ronin View Post
    Given that both parties are probably influenced by Wall Street, and given that most if not all members of the Congress and Senate are probably rich, but it is the Republicans who are pushing for financial deregulation, why do some voters equate Democrats more closely with Wall Street?
    Because reading is hard and BUILD THAT WALL!!

  3. #123

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    No, they won by getting more EC votes, just like Trump did.
    Yes, AND another 90,000 votes in just three states changes the entire 2016 outcome. A 90,000 vote difference in three battleground states is the slimmest of margins and nothing to hang your hat on. Yet I'm watching it get used as the justification to not worry, the Democrats don't get the Electoral college works...what?

    Dump Pelosi? Democratic strategy doesn't work? Democrats don't get the Electoral college???

    Na...that's all bullshit. The GOP had just better get some work done, fast and stop getting so distracted (esp. by Trump's bullshit). They can't even figure out the fix for the ACA, their #1 issue for almost a decade.

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raycetpfl View Post
    People are complex,but I believe he wanted to be on the right side of history ultimately.
    “I’ll have them n_ggers voting Democratic for two hundred years.” -Lyndon B. Johnson

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    'Inside the White House: The Hidden Lives of the Modern Presidents and the Secrets of the World's Most Powerful Institution', by Ronald Kessler
    https://www.amazon.com/Inside-White-...he+white+house
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  5. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raycetpfl View Post
    Both ways have their shitty parts but majority rules seems to make the most sense to me.
    That's mob rule. The Founders spoke out against that too.

    Of course nothing stops any of the 50 States from being run that way.

    A Representative Republic is the best way to go, if you look at history. Are they perfect, of course not. But they are the best form we've seen.
    A succubus is a Lilin-demon in female form, or supernatural entity in folklore that appears in dreams and takes the form of a woman in order to seduce men, usually through sexual activity. Religious traditions hold that repeated sexual activity with a succubus may result in the deterioration of health or mental state, or even in death.

  6. #126
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    The Economist did a write up of the Georgia election: http://www.economist.com/blogs/democ...06/kick-ossoff

    TOWARDS the end of the marathon election in Georgia’s sixth congressional district, Jon Ossoff was in Cobb County for a “Juneteenth” celebration—commemorating the abolition of slavery—in the company of John Lewis, a fellow Democrat who represents much of nearby Atlanta. The Economist asked Mr Lewis if the race was worth the more than $50m spent on it, making it easily the costliest in congressional history. “It’s worth everything,” Mr Lewis said. “We’re talking about the future of America.” The moment captured the oddity and excitement of the contest, and previewed what, for Democrats, was ultimately bitter disappointment.

    To begin with, compare the two men. Mr Lewis is a revered civil-rights leader. Composed and eerily disciplined, Mr Ossoff is a 30-year-old political novice: an unlikely champion of his party’s hopes, though that is what he became, in a vote that came to be seen as a referendum on Donald Trump and the Republican agenda. Judging by the volume of lacerating tweets he dispatched, Mr Trump himself took it personally, even if he misspelled the name of Karen Handel, the eventual Republican winner. He, Mike Pence and Paul Ryan went to Georgia to stump for her.

    Next, consider the district itself. The bits of Cobb and two neighbouring counties of which it is comprised are replete with smart housing developments and pristine lawns. It ought to be safe Republican territory—not least because it has been gerrymandered to make it so. “These lines were not drawn to get Hank Johnson’s protégé to be my representative,” one local Republican confessed, referring to a congressman for whom Mr Ossoff formerly worked. And, until very recently, it was safe: Tom Price, whose appointment as health secretary set off the race, won it by 23 percentage points in November. John McCain and Mitt Romney took the district easily.

    Mr Trump only squeaked it. That is partly because the area is changing. Whites are still a majority in what were classic white-flight places, but a smaller one: Cobb, once a reactionary bastion, will soon be “majority-minority”. The sixth is now the best-educated Republican-held seat in the country. It is, in other words, the sort of relatively cosmopolitan suburb the Democrats ought to take—in California, Texas, Virginia and elsewhere—if they are to regain control of the House in next year’s midterms. David Wasserman of the Cook Political Report notes that Hillary Clinton scored better in only 26 seats held by Republicans. The Democrats’ target in 2018 is 24 seats. “This is right at the tipping point,” Mr Wasserman says.

    Mr Ossoff scouted out one possible, delicate path to that goal. Initially he fired up the Democratic base, and appealed to young voters, by vowing to “Make Trump Furious”. He recruited thousands of volunteers, many of whom had never been involved in politics. Before the vote, one devotee waving a “Vote your Ossoff” placard said she previously feared that admitting left-leaning views in Georgia would mean “your kids will never have a play date”. But, especially after he fell just short of a majority in the first round of voting in April, Mr Ossoff recalibrated his tone to draw in the sliver of moderate Republicans he needed, leaving the Trump-bashing to outside groups. He offered himself as a centrist, almost non-partisan figure and hammer of wasteful spending.

    Great, again
    Ms Handel and her backing PACs, which helped her keep pace with Mr Ossoff’s fundraising, were having none of it. They relentlessly tied him to Nancy Pelosi, the House minority leader, and her “San Francisco values”. (One group lowered the tone from testy to combustible by linking Mr Ossoff to “unhinged leftists” who allegedly cheered the recent shooting of a Republican politician.) Ms Handel faced a dilemma over her own orientation towards Mr Trump. Her approach was to support him if pressed, but not to emphasise him.

    “It is not about what’s going on around the rest of the country,” she declared at her election-eve rally. That also featured a gee-up from Nathan Deal, who beat her in Georgia’s governor’s election in 2010; an electoral veteran, Ms Handel previously lost a Senate race, too. (Her attacks on Mr Deal, his spokesman once sniffed, were “sadder than the end of “Old Yeller”,” a sappy film.) A man in an Uncle Sam suit roared his approval for the counter-slogan, “Keep your Ossoff my lawn”.

    Ms Handel won the run-off on June 20th by four points, confounding polls that predicted a narrow victory for Mr Ossoff. In retrospect the first round, in which 11 Republicans split their party’s vote, was his best chance. Despite the apposite demography, that unusual format, plus the manic attention and spending—a bonanza for local broadcasters—makes the outcome only a muted bellwether for the mid-terms. But that will not stop it being seen as one.

    Even though both candidates insisted that Mr Trump was not on the ballot, everyone else thought he was, and Ms Handel’s strategy of tacit loyalty will be emulated in other tight races. The president’s acolytes were duly jubilant. Given that health care was probably the campaign’s pre-eminent issue, with Ms Handel supporting the replacement of Obamacare, some congressional Republicans may be reassured about the consequences of repeal.

    In truth Mr Ossoff’s performance, like those of Democrats in special elections in Kansas, Montana and South Carolina, was encouraging for his party, given the terrain (see chart below). But some Democrats have seen in his defeat further evidence that centrism is defunct and a more radical brand of opposition is necessary, even if that is unlikely to succeed in the South. “The fight goes on,” he vowed at his election-night party, as Mr Lewis consoled the crowd and elation gave way to deflation, with an afterburn of defiance. Quite how remains to be seen.
    If anything, from reading on this thread, I get that it's not that centrism is defunct. It's more that Ossof got a lot of outside funding and subsequently veered towards centrism (away from "Make Trump Furious"). Of course that would contribute to the appearance of the guy being under control of outside actors.
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  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pship Destroyer View Post
    Yes, AND another 90,000 votes in just three states changes the entire 2016 outcome. A 90,000 vote difference in three battleground states is the slimmest of margins and nothing to hang your hat on. Yet I'm watching it get used as the justification to not worry, the Democrats don't get the Electoral college works...what?

    Dump Pelosi? Democratic strategy doesn't work? Democrats don't get the Electoral college???

    Na...that's all bullshit. The GOP had just better get some work done, fast and stop getting so distracted (esp. by Trump's bullshit). They can't even figure out the fix for the ACA, their #1 issue for almost a decade.

    That little bit of strategy was open to anyone.

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