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  1. #41

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ermghoti View Post
    Oh, right, one of the advantages of the protected fora is that the riff raff generally can't be bothered to pony up, so the conversations are better.
    Don't forget, I'm an unemployed loser so I don't deserve to see those forums, even if I did pony up.

  2. #42

    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    MINOR UPDATE

    JUDO -
    Ground work practise again - but with the same rolling chocks practised from before. Then randori. While everyone else was matched with someone there own grade and weight and changed partners through the evening, I was stuck one-on-one with the classes' most skilled brown belt - who by the way was told by the instructor to push me hard but not kill me. (Don't know whether to be happy that I'm getting personal one-on-one with the higher ranks at this point or terrified.)

    The guy was 20kgs heavier than me and I couldn't pull or push him at all - and he was really fast. So instead of trying to throw him I focused on countering. Failed most times but got a few in and even ended up on top of him once (rolled under his throw and brought him down in a circle under me). Didn't take him long to stop my counters though. Not sure what he did (whether he just threw me too fast or had my arms locked) but he dropped me and I landed flat on my back unable to break the fall. But hurt like hell. Was instantly winded, felt it in my spine and even in stomach and abdomen. Felt like I could feel it in my internal organs. Guy dropped me hard. Scared the crap out of me ad my first though was "This guy just broke my spine..."

    Anyway, lay there for a while as the instructor quickly came and asked if I was okay. Said I thought so and slowly got up. Went with the guy a few more rounds but was too gassed and sat out the last ten minutes or so of the session.

    BOXING & MUAY THAI
    Boxing was the normal cardio and pairing while training drills. This time it was slipping, bobbing and weaving while while opponent throws straights and hooks. Then we did some light sparing in a game of "tag". You had to try land a blow while your opponent could only defend. If you landed then switch roles.

    There were only three of us for Muay Thai and we just did rotated sparring rounds for the evening. Learnt three important things: (1) I really need to keep my guard up. Kept leaving my head open and getting pelted in the face, (2) My suppleness needs attention as I am seriously limited compared to guys who have a full range of motion and height in their legs, and (3) still need to seriously push my cardio.

    Found it difficult to actually get hits in - but did eventually start seeing openings (but couldn't react fast enough to get into them).

    On an interesting note, I did find it rather easy to actually catch legs and punches. At first I was doing it by accident/reflex, but then wondered if I could do it on purpose and found it fairly okay. From a Judo point I think this would be useful? Just my thoughts. Instructor told me not to let opponent go when he noticed me catching punches, but not being able to throw (Muay Thai and not Judo) didn't know what to do to follow up and ended up letting go anyway. Then just tried to focus on getting hits in without getting pummelled in the face...

  3. #43
    goodlun's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by CraigShaw View Post
    but not being able to throw (Muay Thai and not Judo) didn't know what to do to follow up and ended up letting go anyway. Then just tried to focus on getting hits in without getting pummelled in the face...
    My knowledge is very limited on Muay Thai but I am under the impression that you are allowed to "trip" in Muay Thai.
    Not the same thing as throwing but a lot of the principles are very similar.
    Of the single rapier fight between valiant men, having both skill, he that is the best wrestler, or if neither of them can wrestle, the strongest man most commonly kills the other, or leaves him at his mercy.
    –George Silver, Paradoxes of Defence

  4. #44

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    SMALL UPDATE

    Okay, figure it's time for some updates.

    JUDO
    Been having issues with motorbike so wanted to do as little traveling with it as possible so I cut out the Judo for 3 weeks (chose the Boxing and Muay Thai as they aren't out of my way and I pay a high fee for them...)

    Can't start up the Judo again for now though as it is school holidays and Rob doesn't do lessons during the school holidays (so going to have to wait another two weeks or so to pick this up again).

    BOXING/MUAY THAI
    Nothing much to report here. Started noticing things a bit more and ask my trainers questions when things feel weird or "off".

    For example: Last night in boxing we were doing a drill where you had to throw Left Jab, Right Straight, Left Body Hook then partner throws Right Straight, Left Hook, Straight to Body. When throwing my hook (and I was throwing it fine, just like everyone else and the instructor didn't say anything other than "good" when passing by my partner and I), even with guard up I felt wide open - and when my partner was throwing his I wanted to hook him in the head because even though his guard was up on one side, the "hook throwing" side left his head wide open. When the instructor came around again I asked him about it (by the way, wasn't our normal instructor - this guy didn't really seem to point much out whereas other instructors point out lots of stuff in my technique and explaining how to think and react as a fighter). He told me that I would have nothing guarding my head so I needed to step out of center more into my opponents side while keeping low and leaning out. Started doing this and he said his usual "good" but it felt a lot more solid and "safer".

    While the boxing classes seem to be getting bigger, our Muay Thai classes seem to be getting smaller and smaller. Generally it's about 3 or 4 of us (which is nice as we get a lot more personal attention from the trainer and with there normally being no new guys he focus on more technical stuff).

    Last night there was a whole group of new guys and just one guy I've seen once before and none from our small Muay Thai regulars (probably due to the school holidays and families going away). But I did notice that I think I prefer drilling techniques when paired with newbies. Sounds weird, but in watching the new guys I find it easier to evaluate my own movements as it's easier to pick out the wrong movements in their drills (from knowing what the movements are supposed to be). Don't know how to explain it, but there is something about seeing errors that makes it easier to check yourself than seeing a flawless technique and trying to match ever detail of it. (Please, I'm not putting off learning from proper form, technique and explanation - just that it helped me check myself pairing when I paired with the new guys.)

    Anyway, that's about it. Will update again when something interesting comes up.
    And again, apologies for any spelling or grammar mistakes...
    Last edited by CraigShaw; 7/12/2017 1:19am at .

  5. #45

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Your judo class sounds great.

    Good read. Keep it up! Remember, getting smeared all over the mat here and there by guys that grossly out class you is just as important as the nights that you completely rule the world.

    As far as your judo practice is concerned, remember to work on being smooth before being powerful or fast. It's an amazing thing to do a million drills of ippon seoi nage or o soto gari in a slow smooth motion and then one day realize that you can do it fast and maintain your technique.

    Once again, great read. keep it up!

  6. #46
    Ulsteryank's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by CraigShaw View Post

    The second guy got me in an arm-bar so quickly and with such force that I didn't have time to tap out and got injured with some fair pain for about two days. Then I was rolling with a brown belt who explained things to me but he was hell 'o a rough and to teach me that I was too open, rushed in and neck locked me which left my neck pretty sore. The last guy I rolled with was a fat guy (I really don't like saying fat but he was). He was easier on me and I managed to evade him and catch his arms or wrists often in a way he couldn't get them free - but was lost from there and he would then explain to me how to turn my catch into a pressure bar to get him to tap.

    I know I probably sound whiny complaining about how rough the two guys were, but I had to skip Muay Thai the next day because my arm wasn't healed up yet - and that, mixed with the fact that I just don't seem to get the concepts of BJJ and ground fighting at all, made me decide to drop BJJ. (I did join for the Muay Thai after all.)

    It was only two lessons so maybe I didn't give it enough time, but I just couldn't pick up anything at all - and it did cause me to skip out on Muay Thai
    Sorry only getting around to seeing these, but will start by saying that was definitely a dick move, and you're lucky you only had to miss training for that short period of time that you did because of it. It's unfortunate that happened on your second class. That roll should have been more supervised, but it would indeed take way more than two classes to get the feel if it. I understand Muay Thai is your priority, especially with what time you have to focus, but I wouldn't let a bad training partner like that put you off of it if by any chance you get more curious in the future.
    Quote Originally Posted by CraigShaw View Post
    As it stands now, I've given up BJJ for the moment and decided to focus on Muay Thai and Judo with the Boxing for cardio. My thoughts on it is this: I've seen fights where guys have been intent on taking someone to the mat, but the fighter has been able to check them every time with some kind of strike be it knee to the face or shin to the leg. (And in BJJ when that guy lunge for me and caught my neck, my first thought was straight elbow to the face but didn't because it was BJJ - but surely that would have stopped him as he was moving in too quickly to avoid it?)
    Muay Thai is a highly effective form of self defence, and one of my preferred stand up arts because of the clinch, but it is true that a high percentage of fights end up on the ground. Take a strong grappler with a quick level change, and they can near enough double leg anyone at will.

    I love Muay Thai, and I love kicking, and think it helps in being a better striker as well when you know you can execute strikes with the confidence of being able to defend a take down, or be strong on the ground when it goes tits up.

  7. #47

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Been a while and don't have much of an update. Had to drop the Judo due to financial restrictions and put the Muay Thai lessons on hold for a month or two. Should be getting back to the gym this month (been away just over one month).

    Though, thinking about it, the fact that I can't actually train Judo and thus no lessons means dropping it completely, is making me wonder if I should stick with the Judo while getting to the Gym for Muay Thai less often.

    The only thing to mention so far is that before taking a break, I was working with one of the trainers/fighters who encouraged me to work on both orthodox and southpaw as there are things I am more comfortable with when standing orthodox and things I do better southpaw. He worked on pairing me up with a dominant southpaw who also fought orthodox.

    In the beginning I was training drills on both sides as I wanted to be comfortable on both (always just been how I trained). Some of my trainers think of it as a weakness (which I can understand) while others encourage it as a potential strength.

    Originally I was trying to be able to fight identically from each side, but after being studied and focused by my trainer and doing some light sparing, I found that if I let each side develop in it's own way (instead of trying to mirror them) I found it easier to be more fluid and "flow".

    Time constraints and transport have kept me from the Muay Thai, so for about a month have just been drilling basics at home - but should hopefully be back into the gym very soon.

    Anyway, that's my delayed update for anyone interested.

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