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Thread: Crossfit

  1. #11
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Agreed with the Rabbi.
    Doing anything to failure is, well, ripe for failure.
    Adding a time component is even riskier.

  2. #12
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I do think there is merit in the approach of changing things up that said, and there are obviously some excellent athletes in the crossfit crowd.
    You get diminishing returns on anything.
    But that doesn't mean specific exercises aren't the best thing for specific adaptations.
    Doing "other" things other has benefits but people also take that too far.


    My biggest criticism is how crossfit is heavily infused with bro-science.
    This is a great example:

    http://www.exercisebiology.com/index...t_book_review/

  3. #13
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    double post

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    I do think there is merit in the approach of changing things up that said, and there are obviously some excellent athletes in the crossfit crowd.
    You get diminishing returns on anything.
    But that doesn't mean specific exercises aren't the best thing for specific adaptations.
    Doing "other" things other has benefits but people also take that too far.


    My biggest criticism is how crossfit is heavily infused with bro-science.
    This is a great example:

    http://www.exercisebiology.com/index...t_book_review/
    ugh...
    Falling for Judo since 1980

    "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

    "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

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  5. #15
    Kovacs's Avatar
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    Cross Fit, small arms.
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Good Cross Fit I'll defend to the hilt and bad Cross Fit I'll throw to the wolves.

    Injuries: I've never understood the 'omg injuries' criticism of Crossfit. You get injured doing all sports, if a buddy tears a shoulder playing football or hockey people don't give it the 'omg injuries', it's a particularly strange criticism from lifters who gain the exact same injuries from training poorly in a normal gym and its odd coming from martial artists as well who spend their spare time and money often getting fucked up by other people. It an intense form of training where sometimes things go wrong but decent form and strict training help to minimise this as with all sports and training. I've trained cross fit for two years and have received more injuries doing trail running.

    Good instructors will obviously encourage hard training but will also watch for poor form and simply stop people if they look like they're going to kill themselves. Unfortunately cross fit is riddled with instructors who will simply let people crack on to fail

    Lifting: This is key and linked to most injuries. Too many cross fit gyms have little or no real lifting background or expertise, instructors will set their suggested weights for sessions too high and then cheer on a middle-aged housewife with little experience to clean and jerk 100kg, and then look surprised when her colon fires out her arse. A good gym will have instructors with proven track records in lifting outside of cross fit, who have come to the sport with the same strict eye they had when they competed. Good lifting with good circuits is where good cross fit shines out from other training methods. I've seen dozens of guys come from normal gyms with a good background with weights expecting to cream it and the poor cunts are hanging out in the first third of the class.

    Cost: It's infamous for being expensive and I've found this to vary wildly, some places are extremely reasonable and some are a rip-off. Again this isn't specific to cross fit, all gyms and clubs are vulnerable to this depending on the owners.

    Novices/fanboys: This whole cult/family bullshit is true, its encouraged and endorsed by most clubs as it's good for numbers and therefore revenue. It's annoying and embarrassing, a bit like a BJJ blue belt. Worst of all it carries on into the training so when the middle-aged housewife's anus is hanging out of her like a busted cuckoo clock, people are trying to fist bump her and telling her to go heavier next week. A good club will let you train of your own volition, guide you and push you but not kill you. . Usually tips and advice between reps is all people need.

    As a Sport: Personally I love it as a training method and training against others is a sure fire way to improve your fitness but on a larger scale as a sporting event, I'm not so positive. And by that I mean the Cross Fit Games. **** that ****, it completely lets down anyone that trains it with any seriousness. It promotes shocking form to the point where it's cheating. Just... no.

    I've seen better quality judging, sportsmanship and technique and county club levels.

    Kipping: Again something I'm not sold on. It's the method of using momentum to gain a rep. It's basically cheating. It's a good method to help with some of the gymnastic elements and if you can link a large amount of them in a row then then happy days but it does not make a normal rep. Pull ups is a good example, for one normal pull up you can do, you should be able to triple using the kipping technique. A good gym would make the difference very clear, a bad gym would bullshit that everyone can do 30 pull ups off the bat.

    In summary I'd recommend Crossfit to anyone if they can find a decent, honest, disciplined gym. It's helped my military and recreational phys immensely, it's brilliant for power, conditioning and stamina, it's given me a great all-round base fitness that I've specialised from and whenever I find myself doing civi circuits or lifting with mates from normal gyms I've found it much, much easier. Another good point is that because the training spectrum is so broad everyone of any shape and size will find something their good at so can specialise or get stronger at their weaker points.

    Yes there's a lot of shite to cut through but if you can find a decent gym, give it a shot. It works.
    Ne Obliviscaris

  6. #16
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kovacs View Post

    Injuries: I've never understood the 'omg injuries' criticism of Crossfit. You get injured doing all sports, if a buddy tears a shoulder playing football or hockey people don't give it the 'omg injuries', it's a particularly strange criticism from lifters who gain the exact same injuries from training poorly in a normal gym and its odd coming from martial artists as well who spend their spare time and money often getting fucked up by other people. It an intense form of training where sometimes things go wrong but decent form and strict training help to minimise this as with all sports and training. I've trained cross fit for two years and have received more injuries doing trail running.

    Good post, thanks for taking the time.
    The above is the only part I take some contention with.

    If you think about it, a similar injury rate for *just fucking exercising* and *combat/contact sports* should be damn shocking.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tranquil Suit View Post
    How have I missed this beautiful thing.

    "Crossfit is designed around the ulimate in light weight Olympic lifts to infinity.."

    "the meatspin.com of circuit training.."

    "Cardiovascular endurance..or as I like to call it, the ability to lose gains."


    When he did the lift and overhead press with the foam roll, I nearly pissed myself.

    Spoiler:

    Spoiler:
    Oprah's diaphragm LOL that was terrible

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawarma View Post
    Interestingly, a recent local published study stated that x-fitters were no more prone to injuries than other fitness-orientated individuals.
    What is a "local published study", and can you provide a link to this mysterious creature?

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pship Destroyer View Post
    What is a "local published study", and can you provide a link to this mysterious creature?
    As the wording suggested, it's a study published by my national physiotheraoy organisation or whatevs and no, I can't supply a link. Was in the papers, didn't read the study itself.

  10. #20
    Kovacs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    Good post, thanks for taking the time.
    The above is the only part I take some contention with.

    If you think about it, a similar injury rate for *just fucking exercising* and *combat/contact sports* should be damn shocking.
    I'm not talking about the rate of injuries but rather the nature of them (if I'm understanding you correctly). If someone picks up an injury doing the crossfit, the safety standards of the sport are brought into question. If the injury is picked up doing anything else it's usually ignored.

    However... where there's smoke there's fire and I can see how a lot of overly keen novices will smash themselves and blag about it around the water cooler, thus perpetuating th cult impressions. That aspect of the sport I won't defend.

    What I should have mentioned earlier is that while critics concentrate on the injuries they never mention the benefits. When proper, correct olly or power lifting is combined with a tough but achievable circuit, the advantages are huge. Every part of the body is worked out and it's a hugely efficient system, it just takes discipline from the individual and from the trainer. Sadly both tend to be lacking across the sport in general.
    Ne Obliviscaris

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