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    What Can You Tell Me About Ted Wong Jeet Kune Do?

    There's a Ted Wong JKD club in my area. The price is right and so is the schedule. I've read a bit about JKD in general but I haven't found much specifically about Ted Wong. Does anyone know anything about his organization? Any opinions on what kind of training I should expect from a Ted Wong JKD club? (I searched on here but not much came up. Sorry if this is very noobish.) Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fighter X View Post
    There's a Ted Wong JKD club in my area. The price is right and so is the schedule. I've read a bit about JKD in general but I haven't found much specifically about Ted Wong. Does anyone know anything about his organization? Any opinions on what kind of training I should expect from a Ted Wong JKD club? (I searched on here but not much came up. Sorry if this is very noobish.) Thanks!
    I knew that Ted Wong was a big Wing Chun guy but didn't know that he taught JKD.


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    You can not intellectualize your way to being a competent fighter.

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    JKD, from one perspective, was meant to be a philosophy not a style but has largely become branded as such. Following this notion there are two main camps today- Jun Fan JKD and JKD concepts. Ted Wong was a student and sparing partner of Lee and falls into the former camp, named after Lee's Chinese birth name.

    This means that you would learn what is often dubbed "Jun Fan Kickboxing", which advocates standing with the stronger side forward- traditionally unorthodox in Boxing. From this base you would be taught kicking techniques common to numerous styles, as well as the basics of Boxing and techniques such as the straight blast. You would also learn Bruce's approach to the Wing Chun elements from this era, which was largely an attempt to blend the ranges of Kickboxing and trapping.

    The value of the approach, both in general and in relation to what is out there now, is debatable. On one hand you will learn to fight as a Southpaw, a useful skill should you choose to transition to Muay Thai. You will also learn some relatively unique concepts and should get to the stage of stand up sparring- if it follows the common expectations of a Jun Fan academy. On the other hand one could argue that you will learn some incorrect concepts, such as turning the lead foot in to "avoid groin kicks" and standing exceptionally bladed, that are particularly outdated today- considering that leg kicks are a common factor in many striking sports. However some fighters use similar methods in spite of this and bladed stances especially can have their advantages if put into perspective. The obvious flaw of teaching a street fighting style that espouses being well rounded but neglects ground fighting is also a sticking point and an unfortunate product of its era.

    In my opinion however, undoubtedly the worst thing about JKD, especially Jun Fan, is the amount of time you'll waste on the Wing Chun elements that don't closely resemble/feed into the striking concepts seen in combat sports- I.e. the majority of trapping/chi sao.

    Jun Fan will likely serve you as far as limited striking is concerned and can offer elements in terms of cross training but, as a base without said cross training, is generally inferior to Muay Thai- If you are looking for a kickboxing base I'd say look for something in line with that. If it's a choice between Jun Fan and a typical krotty dojo/dojang then go with the Jun Fan.
    Last edited by Aka-Tora; 12/15/2016 9:14am at .

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    To beat a dead horse: It should also be noted that Lee was not a professional fighter. If he were alive, in the state he was at his very peak, he would be decimated in the Octagon with or without rules. Make sure not to buy into the Bruce Lee hypetrain- he may have been knowledgeable and competent, especially back then but he wasn't a killing machine.
    Last edited by Aka-Tora; 12/15/2016 9:11am at .

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    Thanks for the input. That's very insightful!

    I've actually done Muay Thai in the past (along with a variety of other styles) but right now my schedule limits what I can and can't do. This club is nearby and its schedule works well with mine. I know I'll never be a street-fighting UFC champion but I want to make sure that I get a decent workout and (probably more importantly) that I'm not wasting my team on larper garbage. So if this is akin to kickboxing though not as intense or effective as Muay Thai, I'm comfortable with that.

    Thanks for the info. If anyone has anything more to add, I'm all ears.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aka-Tora View Post
    To beat a dead horse: It should also be noted that Lee was not a professional fighter. If he were alive, in the state he was at his very peak, he would be decimated in the Octagon with or without rules. Make sure not to buy into the Bruce Lee hypetrain- he may have been knowledgeable and competent, especially back then but he wasn't a killing machine.
    No way to know either way.

    All such statements about how Bruce Lee or any other long dead person would do in a UFC MMA match are purely speculative.

    Bruce Lee was a mixed martial artist who cross trained in Judo and submissions with Gene LeBell, among others.

    And Bruce Lee could certainly throw a strike, and was familiar with dirty fight tactics.

    Bruce Lee was a bit on the light side as far as weight.

    Even today, how one fighter would do against another can only be decided in the ring/cage/street,

    and anybody may end up beating anybody else on any given day because outliers and improbable events happen.

    Even though patterns and probabilities do tend to emerge given sufficient data and analysis on that data.
    Last edited by WFMurphyPhD; 12/15/2016 9:56am at .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fighter X View Post
    Thanks for the input. That's very insightful!

    I've actually done Muay Thai in the past (along with a variety of other styles) but right now my schedule limits what I can and can't do. This club is nearby and its schedule works well with mine. I know I'll never be a street-fighting UFC champion but I want to make sure that I get a decent workout and (probably more importantly) that I'm not wasting my team on larper garbage. So if this is akin to kickboxing though not as intense or effective as Muay Thai, I'm comfortable with that.

    Thanks for the info. If anyone has anything more to add, I'm all ears.
    No problem. It tends to be part kickboxing however it obviously has other areas to its syllabus and I don't know what the precise ratio between them tends to be- and they'll obviously vary between schools. There's more of an organised standard than in Concepts. I don't know the club in question but if it conforms to the typical Jun Fan approach of Ted Wong it should follow the principles I've mentioned. Ground fighting will be very, very limited but you'll be doing pad work instead of Kata and continuous sparring with kicks to the leg rather than point fighting so it's not a bad option. Hard sparring may not be as common or frequent as some would like but hopefully you'll enjoy it. I'd recommend checking out New England Jeet Kune Do's channel as I believe the instructor might be a direct student of Wong and give you an idea of what you might find.

    Stance theory: https://youtu.be/C6VVdZShLRA
    Some sparring drills: https://youtu.be/cEBo6ZdcX5s

    A different source but this is the sort of trapping you'll find: https://youtu.be/XpOTci5P7wQ
    Last edited by Aka-Tora; 12/15/2016 10:38am at .

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    Quote Originally Posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    No way to know either way.

    All such statements about how Bruce Lee or any other long dead person would do in a UFC MMA match are purely speculative.

    Bruce Lee was a mixed martial artist who cross trained in Judo and submissions with Gene LeBell, among others.

    And Bruce Lee could certainly throw a strike, and was familiar with dirty fight tactics.

    Bruce Lee was a bit on the light side as far as weight.

    Even today, how one fighter would do against another can only be decided in the ring/cage/street,

    and anybody may end up beating anybody else on any given day because outliers and improbable events happen.

    Even though patterns and probabilities do tend to emerge given sufficient data and analysis on that data.
    Obviously we'll never know, agreed. But I can only go off evidence. Most sources, as you'll probably know, indicate a fairly limited knowledge of grappling, despite the direction he was going in with Lebell and his encounters with Wrestling. There are variables but in a duelling environment where there is potentially a large gap in fighting ability, in the case of a decent relatively high level MMA fighter (which I should have clarified), the better fighter will win on paper.

    He was athletic and trained hard- which is why I don't want to dismiss him as "just an actor" like some in the MMA community do. It seems we agree on this but I can see how I might have come across as a little too negative.
    Last edited by Aka-Tora; 12/15/2016 10:37am at .

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