Thread: Paper Tigers

  1. #191
    Ice Hole's Avatar
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    P. 400, "The Wizard of Fu", Part Two

    The first time I summarized this article, I missed some nuance. It is one of the better essays in the book, and Allan saved it for the end.

    It began with a story about Ondash attending a "Shaolin Kung Fu school" with a "colored belt system" and "personalized training manuals". My immediate thought was Shaolin-Do or something similar. The essay discusses his experience with the "closed door" teaching instruction method common in TMA, where an allegedly skilled master will take special students behind a "closed door" in order to teach them elite level skills.

    Ondash discovered through a friend some 8mm footage of the Shaolin master intended to become training material for disciples/franchisees, and was shocked to discover the old man was "ham-fisted" and had "no waist, nor any other kind of consistent stationary, turning, tilting, or rooting power."

    But before the reader can begin to nod their head in agreement, Allan expounds further, getting technical on us.

    "most of his power was obviously muscularly driven"
    "his external yin and yan was out of whack due to the fact that he always retracted his guard hands long before his striking hands reached their full extensions."
    Ondash begins to pontificate on how easy it must be to hide lack of ability using the open/closed door teaching method, especially if what's available to closed door students isn't always anything special.

    "One must consider that if he or she is new to martial arts, or has no one else to compare their teacher to, then they most likely would not become aware of the fact that the teacher might be poorly skilled
    OK."
    "Since he (a head instructor) practices in private and creates the illusion that he is superior, his students will never be given the chance to consider that he may have any bad habits at all. Not that they would anyway, but still, not knowing really sucks for them"
    Naturally, this skeptic did what anyone else would have done when presented with the fact that his master might be a big faker. He dumped everything he'd already learned and traveled to Chinatown, Philadelphia to find true Northern and Southern Shaolin Kung Fu. It only took a few days with his new Shaolin master for Allan to "feel extreme power in everything I did."

    Allan then describes the dissonance between the schools, trying to come up with a rationale. He reasons that his old instructor sucked and made mistakes, which had made Allan suck at kung fu. His new Shaolin teacher had immediately fixed everything because he had the real Shaolin kung fu. On his ex-instructor, Allan laments his old classmates as, "the ones who continue to suffer under his rule".

    The essay ends with Allan pondering the value of training in "seclusion", and not practicing in front of others, as a way of introducing bad habits. He gives an anecdote about a class where he was challenged by students for saying one thing but doing another, and responded with a common MA instructor cliche, "Do as I say, not as I do".

    Ultimately, Allan's essay (the last in the book) seems to provide valuable advice, buried in his usual heap of pseudoscience bullshit and MMA hating: hiding your training from other, training alone, or training without someone to fix your own mistakes, is a great way to suck. And if you're an instructor, you will only pass that suck onto students.

    And if school is designed to cost more for secret, arcane, back room instruction that no one else is allowed to see...walk away.

    "It is only fair to warn all the Dorothy's, Tin Mans, Lions, and Scarecrows out there that the person behind the curtain may not be who he or she appears to be".

    Final Grade: B+
    Last edited by Ice Hole; 10/10/2017 6:01pm at .

  2. #192

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    Do it again.
    Dan Severn loves raping people.

  3. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    P. 400, "The Wizard of Fu", Part Two

    The first time I summarized this article, I missed some nuance. It is one of the better essays in the book, and Allan saved it for the end.

    It began with a story about Ondash attending a "Shaolin Kung Fu school" with a "colored belt system" and "personalized training manuals". My immediate thought was Shaolin-Do or something similar. The essay discusses his experience with the "closed door" teaching instruction method common in TMA, where an allegedly skilled master will take special students behind a "closed door" in order to teach them elite level skills.

    Ondash discovered through a friend some 8mm footage of the Shaolin master intended to become training material for disciples/franchisees, and was shocked to discover the old man was "ham-fisted" and had "no waist, nor any other kind of consistent stationary, turning, tilting, or rooting power."

    But before the reader can begin to nod their head in agreement, Allan expounds further, getting technical on us.





    Ondash begins to pontificate on how easy it must be to hide lack of ability using the open/closed door teaching method, especially if what's available to closed door students isn't always anything special.





    Naturally, this skeptic did what anyone else would have done when presented with the fact that his master might be a big faker. He dumped everything he'd already learned and traveled to Chinatown, Philadelphia to find true Northern and Southern Shaolin Kung Fu. It only took a few days with his new Shaolin master for Allan to "feel extreme power in everything I did."

    Allan then describes the dissonance between the schools, trying to come up with a rationale. He reasons that his old instructor sucked and made mistakes, which had made Allan suck at kung fu. His new Shaolin teacher had immediately fixed everything because he had the real Shaolin kung fu. On his ex-instructor, Allan laments his old classmates as, "the ones who continue to suffer under his rule".

    The essay ends with Allan pondering the value of training in "seclusion", and not practicing in front of others, as a way of introducing bad habits. He gives an anecdote about a class where he was challenged by students for saying one thing but doing another, and responded with a common MA instructor cliche, "Do as I say, not as I do".

    Ultimately, Allan's essay (the last in the book) seems to provide valuable advice, buried in his usual heap of pseudoscience bullshit and MMA hating: hiding your training from other, training alone, or training without someone to fix your own mistakes, is a great way to suck. And if you're an instructor, you will only pass that suck onto students.

    And if school is designed to cost more for secret, arcane, back room instruction that no one else is allowed to see...walk away.


    Final Grade: B+
    Quote Originally Posted by Holy Moment View Post
    Do it again.
    What ? HUH WHAT!??!?!?! You think Rabbit is your fucking dancing Monkey? I am your fucking dancing monkey boy

    HERE TAKE!
    P. 400, "The Wizard of Fu", Part Two

    The first time I summarized this article, I missed some nuance. It is one of the better essays in the book, and Allan saved it for the end.

    It began with a story about Ondash attending a "Shaolin Kung Fu school" with a "colored belt system" and "personalized training manuals". My immediate thought was Shaolin-Do or something similar. The essay discusses his experience with the "closed door" teaching instruction method common in TMA, where an allegedly skilled master will take special students behind a "closed door" in order to teach them elite level skills.

    Ondash discovered through a friend some 8mm footage of the Shaolin master intended to become training material for disciples/franchisees, and was shocked to discover the old man was "ham-fisted" and had "no waist, nor any other kind of consistent stationary, turning, tilting, or rooting power."

    But before the reader can begin to nod their head in agreement, Allan expounds further, getting technical on us.





    Ondash begins to pontificate on how easy it must be to hide lack of ability using the open/closed door teaching method, especially if what's available to closed door students isn't always anything special.





    Naturally, this skeptic did what anyone else would have done when presented with the fact that his master might be a big faker. He dumped everything he'd already learned and traveled to Chinatown, Philadelphia to find true Northern and Southern Shaolin Kung Fu. It only took a few days with his new Shaolin master for Allan to "feel extreme power in everything I did."

    Allan then describes the dissonance between the schools, trying to come up with a rationale. He reasons that his old instructor sucked and made mistakes, which had made Allan suck at kung fu. His new Shaolin teacher had immediately fixed everything because he had the real Shaolin kung fu. On his ex-instructor, Allan laments his old classmates as, "the ones who continue to suffer under his rule".

    The essay ends with Allan pondering the value of training in "seclusion", and not practicing in front of others, as a way of introducing bad habits. He gives an anecdote about a class where he was challenged by students for saying one thing but doing another, and responded with a common MA instructor cliche, "Do as I say, not as I do".

    Ultimately, Allan's essay (the last in the book) seems to provide valuable advice, buried in his usual heap of pseudoscience bullshit and MMA hating: hiding your training from other, training alone, or training without someone to fix your own mistakes, is a great way to suck. And if you're an instructor, you will only pass that suck onto students.

    And if school is designed to cost more for secret, arcane, back room instruction that no one else is allowed to see...walk away.
    Now who is your dancing monkey?
    Yeah, that's what I thought!
    Quote Originally Posted by ghost55 View Post
    Violence is pretty uncommon in clubs in this area, and the dude didn't seem particularly hostile up until the moment he slapped me.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    BILL HICKS,
    1961-1994

    Quote Originally Posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    Slamming the man in the bottom position from time to time keeps everybody on their toes and discourages butt scooting stupidity.

  4. #194
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    Pick a number, monkey. Trust me, it's worth it.

  5. #195
    Christmas Spirit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    Pick a number, monkey. Trust me, it's worth it.
    217 plz
    Quote Originally Posted by ghost55 View Post
    Violence is pretty uncommon in clubs in this area, and the dude didn't seem particularly hostile up until the moment he slapped me.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    BILL HICKS,
    1961-1994

    Quote Originally Posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    Slamming the man in the bottom position from time to time keeps everybody on their toes and discourages butt scooting stupidity.

  6. #196
    Ice Hole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
    217 plz
    "To Spar or Not to Spar".

    Oh god, I read three sentences. This one's going to be a lot harder than the last one. Give us time, ...the bridge is smashed.

  7. #197
    Christmas Spirit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    "To Spar or Not to Spar".

    Oh god, I read three sentences. This one's going to be a lot harder than the last one. Give us time, ...the bridge is smashed.
    yOU THINK thiS is SOMe random reuqst!?!
    Mush Rabbit Mush !!

    HAHAHHAHAH!
    Quote Originally Posted by ghost55 View Post
    Violence is pretty uncommon in clubs in this area, and the dude didn't seem particularly hostile up until the moment he slapped me.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    BILL HICKS,
    1961-1994

    Quote Originally Posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    Slamming the man in the bottom position from time to time keeps everybody on their toes and discourages butt scooting stupidity.

  8. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
    yOU THINK thiS is SOMe random reuqst!?!
    Mush Rabbit Mush !!

    HAHAHHAHAH!
    "sparring (free fighting) is one of the worst things a practioner can do to try and gain true fighting ability."
    (p. 216).

    I have to read this essay inch by inch. It's not easy.

  9. #199
    Christmas Spirit's Avatar
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    oh yes context is berry berry important.
    Otherwise wisdom will be lost.
    Quote Originally Posted by ghost55 View Post
    Violence is pretty uncommon in clubs in this area, and the dude didn't seem particularly hostile up until the moment he slapped me.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    BILL HICKS,
    1961-1994

    Quote Originally Posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    Slamming the man in the bottom position from time to time keeps everybody on their toes and discourages butt scooting stupidity.

  10. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    I have to read this essay inch by inch. It's not easy.
    The ancient CMA method of eye-toughening.

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