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  1. Cassius is online now
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    Posted On:
    8/06/2014 4:56pm

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     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    Interesting, more fuel for the research. I want a Le6920 so, a colt 1911 would be a possibility, except if I get a handgun from the same company it will be a Colt .45. Yes, I know, but it is a "grail" piece for me in the future.
    Colts are nice for purists but you definitely pay for brand name. As I mentioned, I am biased toward the Springfield low/mid level 1911s, but Colts are obviously the original. Nothing wrong with buying exactly what you want, especially with a fun gun.

    Again, if you anticipate future gunsmith customization, be aware that some gunsmiths prefer not to work on Alloy or Investment Cast frames (and investment cast slides). This thread spurred me to a bit more research into Kimber, and I believe the lower level models I recommended are alloy. Just an FYI. Rock Island is probably the most reputable budget 1911, and I don't think you would regret purchasing one. They are investment cast (again, you may have issues with snobby gunsmiths), but now that they have their manufacturing processes sorted out, they are as reliable and as accurate as any 1911, pretty much. Really good, tight tolerances too.

    I personally think alloy and Investment Cast frames/slides are just fine, but I just wanted you to be aware that you may run into issues with elitist gunsmiths if that is the road you want to go down someday.

    Quote Originally Posted by Southpaw View Post
    Because I care about you I will tell you that you are doing yourself a huge disservice if you are buying guns for fun (like a 1911) but don't yet have an ak-47. Your selfish decision-making is putting your entire family at risk. Run now to a gun shop and buy a Saiga.
    Please keep your subsequent posts on topic. IIF started a thread recently about the current ban on importation of Russian-made firearms, and if you would like to participate in the panic-mongering about Saigas, please post your thoughts there.
    Last edited by Cassius; 8/06/2014 5:01pm at . Reason: clarification
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  2. tgace is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/06/2014 5:43pm


     Style: Arnis/Kenpo hybrid

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I once test fired the Para Ordanance LDA (Light Double Action) and have to say that I went into it skeptical about a DAO 1911 but it made a convert of me.

    I never followed up on any research regarding its flaws, but if and when I get some scratch for a new toy I'm going to check it out again.
  3. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/06/2014 5:48pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You don't know how bad I want to post "Nevermind, I bought a PS4" right now.
  4. TEA is online now
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    Posted On:
    8/06/2014 10:14pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    As someone mentioned early on in the thread, it mostly comes down to what features you want and how much you're willing to spend. Here is a thread on the 1911 Forum you may find informative:
    http://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=356544

    For me, if I had a $1.5K budget, I'd go with a Colt Wiley Clapp Government Model. One does pay a bit of a premium for the Colt name, but most of the price is driven by labor costs (all union shop in the USA and some processes still being done by hand on original equipment). The Wiley Clapp Government Model is a semi-custom Series '70 with most of more contemporary modifications that many shooters look for in a 1911 (lowered and flared ejection port, improved sights, undercut trigger guard, beavertail grip safety, checkering on the front strap). I own an original Series '70 and have priced doing these mods ala cart and they would add well over $1K to a base pistol that normally goes for around $1K.

    The only thing I don't like on the WC is the original small nub of a thumb safety, but safeties are easy to swap out.

    If I had a bit of a higher budget, I'd probably look for a Les Baer Thunder Ranch Special. The only thing I don't like on these is the front cocking serrations. I hate FCS from both a practical and aesthetic standpoint - they tear up holsters and are ugly as sin - but that's just my opinion. I've never owned a Les Baer, but have heard nothing but good about them. Oooh, wait, I just found a used one on Gunpoker for less than a Colt WC Government Model. http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=433401440 The trigger does not look original, though. :(
    Last edited by TEA; 8/06/2014 10:21pm at .
    Mushi mo atsui hodo
    Mushiatsui

    Originally Posted by chuey
    ...Well **** if that isn't the most anti-Mr. Miyagi **** I have heard in ages.

    Two wrongs don't make a right, but
    Three rights make a left.
  5. Devil is offline
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    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten.

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    Posted On:
    8/07/2014 6:40am

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    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cassius View Post
    Again, if you anticipate future gunsmith customization, be aware that some gunsmiths prefer not to work on Alloy or Investment Cast frames (and investment cast slides).

    I personally think alloy and Investment Cast frames/slides are just fine, but I just wanted you to be aware that you may run into issues with elitist gunsmiths if that is the road you want to go down someday.
    I'd be genuinely interested to hear about your experiences with gunsmiths that left you with those impressions.

    The gunsmiths I know who offer general repair services are not idealogical and snobby about what kind of gun they work on. In fact, almost every working gunsmith makes a significant portion of their income working on complete pieces of **** because people never throw away guns and everybody has an old piece of **** that belonged to their grandfather that they want fixed. That's just part of the business.

    Working with alloys is no different than working with carbon steel. As far as the level of difficulty, the most challenging metals to work with are probably super hard carbon steels, like Mauser bolts and soforth.

    The more likely reason you may find gunsmiths who shy away from working on non-carbon steel guns is because you have more refinishing options with carbon steel. Repairs often require refinishing and every finishing option that a gunsmith offers requires a significant investment in equipment and supplies, and each option requires a good bit of space in their shop.

    The most common offerings are caustic bluing and parkerization. Neither of those can be done on aluminum or stainless. Actually, stainless can be blued but it requires a completely different solution and probably a whole new set of bluing tanks since the gunsmith's existing tanks will be full of solution for bluing carbon steels.

    Anodizing is an option with aluminum but very few gunsmiths are set up to offer anodizing. Most gunsmiths will offer some type of spray-on finish like Cerakote. If they do, it's very unlikely they would turn down work because of some bias against alloys. But again, Cerakote requires a paint booth, a sprayer, an oven, a blasting cabinet, a compressor, a selection of paints, etc, etc. If they don't do spray-on finishes, you're probably **** out of luck if your gun isn't made of carbon steel - not because of snobbery or elitism, but because of dollars and cents.
  6. Mor Sao is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/07/2014 9:44am

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     Style: Jook Lum South Mantis,

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I bought a Smith & Wesson officers frame 1911. Great gun.

    Cannot go wrong with a S&W.







  7. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/07/2014 10:44am

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mor Sao View Post
    I bought a Smith & Wesson officers frame 1911. Great gun.

    Cannot go wrong with a S&W.
    I have (my wife) a .9mm S&W, it is a good gun. The prices for their MP-15 Sport keeps dropping. If it hits 519 again I'm picking one up.
  8. DarkPhoenix is offline
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    I feel like you eyeballin' me, dawg!

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    Posted On:
    8/07/2014 10:59am


     Style: Judo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    I have (my wife) a .9mm S&W, it is a good gun. The prices for their MP-15 Sport keeps dropping. If it hits 519 again I'm picking one up.

    You can never go wrong with an AR. You have the M&P 9 or the M&P Shield? I have heard nothing but good things about both.
    Quote Originally Posted by Holy Moment View Post
    BJJ JOE: I'm going to make hate to you. Right here, right now.
    ... Ohhhhhhhh, I'm going to make hate to you so hard that your kinfolk back in Africa will feel it.l
    Quote Originally Posted by Archer
    Karate is the Dane Cook of martial arts
  9. Cassius is online now
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    Posted On:
    8/08/2014 7:04pm

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Devil View Post
    I'd be genuinely interested to hear about your experiences with gunsmiths that left you with those impressions.

    The gunsmiths I know who offer general repair services are not idealogical and snobby about what kind of gun they work on. In fact, almost every working gunsmith makes a significant portion of their income working on complete pieces of **** because people never throw away guns and everybody has an old piece of **** that belonged to their grandfather that they want fixed. That's just part of the business.

    Working with alloys is no different than working with carbon steel. As far as the level of difficulty, the most challenging metals to work with are probably super hard carbon steels, like Mauser bolts and soforth.

    The more likely reason you may find gunsmiths who shy away from working on non-carbon steel guns is because you have more refinishing options with carbon steel. Repairs often require refinishing and every finishing option that a gunsmith offers requires a significant investment in equipment and supplies, and each option requires a good bit of space in their shop.

    The most common offerings are caustic bluing and parkerization. Neither of those can be done on aluminum or stainless. Actually, stainless can be blued but it requires a completely different solution and probably a whole new set of bluing tanks since the gunsmith's existing tanks will be full of solution for bluing carbon steels.

    Anodizing is an option with aluminum but very few gunsmiths are set up to offer anodizing. Most gunsmiths will offer some type of spray-on finish like Cerakote. If they do, it's very unlikely they would turn down work because of some bias against alloys. But again, Cerakote requires a paint booth, a sprayer, an oven, a blasting cabinet, a compressor, a selection of paints, etc, etc. If they don't do spray-on finishes, you're probably **** out of luck if your gun isn't made of carbon steel - not because of snobbery or elitism, but because of dollars and cents.
    I had a gunsmith in GA (in 2009) and two gunsmiths (2010) in MD tell me that they would not work on investment cast frames/slides or alloy frames. I was also advised not to purchase an IC slide/alloy frame 1911 at a local FFL in Maryland in 2012. All three gunsmiths were very professional with regards to what I was actually there for. I admit, I did not ask them to explain themselves as to why they had issues with what I was asking about. To be fair to them, I was far less educated about firearms than I am now. Based on your feedback, I'm assuming their issues were with poorly QCed IC frames/slides in the models we discussed, as well as the refinishing issues you mentioned. Based on your feedback, I'm thinking that IIF shouldn't worry about either issue. Thanks for chiming in with your more informed perspective.
    Last edited by Cassius; 8/08/2014 7:09pm at . Reason: clarity
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  10. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/08/2014 7:13pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh, I am not, but I asked to get all of this information. I'm not a gun noob, but I'm not much above a beginner.
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