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  1. blackmonk is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/19/2014 6:04am

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     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
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    So this concept is starting to play out in randori a little bit. Last night, I was sparring with our top competitor (he's 15 years younger than me, and doggedly aggressive), and getting that grip-of-sorts on the calf allowed me much safer entry and exit when attempting osoto gari on him.

    I was able to complete the osoto like this on another training partner in the same practice, but I'm not using that as a measuring stick yet. It was against a former nationally-ranked wrestler with little experience in the jacket.

    I mention their "credentials" only as it plays into the relative success/failure assessments of my progress in this throw.
  2. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    7/21/2014 11:37am

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    I spazzed out in my response, and was thinking of a normal aka "classical" Osoto Gari. The "hooking/cross body" version is different, of course.
    I need to clarify again. Nothing like a weekend of camping and fishing to bring some perspective, LOL.

    I've been using terms that may or may not be confusing. The "hook-hop-reap" type of Osoto Gari that blackmonk was doing, and that Jimmy Pedro demonstrates (in an opposite grip situation) is in a way a form of entry (hairi kata) for a "normal" Osoto Gari. It's used when you are unable to take that first deep "penetration step" as in a standard Osoto Gari. However exactly it's done, you pin uke weight on the leg get his body tipped over the foot, and then hop (ken-ken) to the more or less standard Osoto Gari position, then apply the reap.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  3. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    7/21/2014 11:43am

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    I note Pedro gets his hopping leg at or past uke's leg but you don't. Classic osoto the step is even deeper. The crash mat might be interfering with your footwork.
    I find that crash pads usually interfere with my footwork, period.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  4. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/28/2014 3:43pm

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     Style: Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackmonk View Post
    So this concept is starting to play out in randori a little bit. Last night, I was sparring with our top competitor (he's 15 years younger than me, and doggedly aggressive), and getting that grip-of-sorts on the calf allowed me much safer entry and exit when attempting osoto gari on him.
    Glad to hear that this is having a positive effect.

    The 'gripping' with the foot really does make a huge difference and as you've found, it much increases the safety of entry and exit into the technique.

    If combined with good sleeve and lapel/head control it effectively nullifies most counter attacking options, because uke is so focussed on staying on balance and avoiding the score they don't have the capacity to try and counter attack.
  5. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/28/2014 3:46pm

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     Style: Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    I find that crash pads usually interfere with my footwork, period.
    I can't agree more. The number of times I've been on a mat and the crashmat has been actively enforcing incorrect technique is beyond counting.

    Most clubs would be better off teaching their members how to breakfall and throw people safely rather than wasting money on crashmats that only encourage shitty technique.
  6. BKR is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/28/2014 4:50pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    I can't agree more. The number of times I've been on a mat and the crashmat has been actively enforcing incorrect technique is beyond counting.

    Most clubs would be better off teaching their members how to breakfall and throw people safely rather than wasting money on crashmats that only encourage shitty technique.
    LOL, but we just don't know how to properly use crash pads, don't you know...

    All clubs should always teach their members how to break-fall and throw people safely, then use crash pads for specialized training, if needed. Learning how to take falls, and to throw with control is an integral part of learning Judo. IMO, at least...
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  7. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    7/28/2014 6:04pm


     Style: Kendo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My exception is ura-nage. Sorry, I just hate taking that fall.
  8. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    7/28/2014 6:37pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    My exception is ura-nage. Sorry, I just hate taking that fall.
    I do use crash pads for Ura Nage, when first instructing it. Interference is minimal...

    Going through Nage No Kata though, it's the real deal.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  9. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    7/28/2014 7:04pm


     Style: Kendo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    I do use crash pads for Ura Nage, when first instructing it. Interference is minimal...

    Going through Nage No Kata though, it's the real deal.
    Yeah, you have to take that fall. And yoko-gake which isn't any fun either. But I digress.
  10. blackmonk is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/28/2014 10:16pm

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     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh ****. Yoko gake is awful.

    We use the crash pad only for taking tons of high-amplitude throws in one day (100+), or when we're doing specific drilling where the risk of injury is a little higher. For people who have trouble committing to throws because they are afraid of hurting their partner, I'll have them throw against a fully-resisting uke onto the crash pad for a few dozen reps, and then go back to randori. They usually start crushing that throw in randori right after.

    Otherwise, we take all falls on the tatami.
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