225012 Bullies, 3598 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 41 to 50 of 74
Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 678 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. blackmonk is online now
    blackmonk's Avatar

    Welterweight

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    879

    Posted On:
    7/11/2014 4:45pm

    supporting member
     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Your observation is exactly right on, though. It has been that way for a while now, hence me videoing my randori lately, so I can have a constant visual reference.
  2. BKR is offline
    BKR's Avatar

    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bonners Ferry, Idaho
    Posts
    4,476

    Posted On:
    7/11/2014 4:49pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by blackmonk View Post
    Your observation is exactly right on, though. It has been that way for a while now, hence me videoing my randori lately, so I can have a constant visual reference.
    That's a good thing to do. I've found it helps me out a lot as judoka and as a coach. As in , the last time I videoed myself doing Judo earlier this year, I looked a lot worse than I felt. Getting older and slower suck, LOL !

    Some of my students are helped by watching themselves, others not so much. I think it is linked to preferred learning style more or less.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  3. blackmonk is online now
    blackmonk's Avatar

    Welterweight

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    879

    Posted On:
    7/11/2014 4:53pm

    supporting member
     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    I looked a lot worse than I felt. Getting older and slower suck.
    Yeah, that's me. Hate it.
  4. cereus is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    76

    Posted On:
    7/12/2014 4:11pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    After reading this thread and the kani basami one I'm worried I might injure someone's knee with osoto gari, I do bjj and we drill throws/takedowns a lot but mostly only spar with them leading up to competition. So I'm asking out of concern for my training partners (for when we next spar from standing) and hope you can forgive me if I don't communicate this well.

    When I drill I reap the leg in a very straight line in the direction the knee bends naturally but the part I am concerned about is pulling uke's sleeve towards me and pushing away with the hand on the collar, I'm worried this could cause a twisting motion and hurt uke's knee. It's probably a more basic point than this thread merits but it seemed better than starting a new thread.
  5. blackmonk is online now
    blackmonk's Avatar

    Welterweight

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    879

    Posted On:
    7/12/2014 5:09pm

    supporting member
     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by cereus View Post
    After reading this thread and the kani basami one I'm worried I might injure someone's knee with osoto gari, I do bjj and we drill throws/takedowns a lot but mostly only spar with them leading up to competition. So I'm asking out of concern for my training partners (for when we next spar from standing) and hope you can forgive me if I don't communicate this well.

    When I drill I reap the leg in a very straight line in the direction the knee bends naturally but the part I am concerned about is pulling uke's sleeve towards me and pushing away with the hand on the collar, I'm worried this could cause a twisting motion and hurt uke's knee. It's probably a more basic point than this thread merits but it seemed better than starting a new thread.
    I don't know, man. That sounds pretty normal to me. Pulling the sleeve and pushing the collar just sounds like good kuzushi.

    BUT while I never go out to purposefully hurt someone, I throw them with the purpose of throwing them. Most of the time, how they land is their business. Learning good ukemi is there for a reason.
  6. cereus is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    76

    Posted On:
    7/12/2014 7:06pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks, it was basically the talk of everything that can hurt someone's knee that kind of made me panic.
  7. judoka_uk is offline
    judoka_uk's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    England
    Posts
    4,619

    Posted On:
    7/13/2014 8:10am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by blackmonk View Post


    This is literally reps 95-100 from my 1st practice today, so I'm surprised they don't look too bad.

    I just focused on breaking uke's posture, entering quickly-ish, and keeping a neutral back and neck position. Toward the end, I started to get good chest-to-hip contact, also, which caused the throw to require much less effort.
    I'm not sure if this is a result of tiredness or whether the shoes make it harder to do, or both.

    However, your initial contact positioning with the leg is off.

    You're making loose contact with either the high calf or sometimes the back of your knee





    In randori and contest this won't give you the necessary control and pining of the leg that you need.

    You want to make firm and tight contact with your toes pointed down and the blade of you foot in contact with uke's calf





    This will ensure uke can't slip his leg out and that as you break his balance over the leg you're attacking you keep the leg and the weight pinned as you enter.

    I would recommend doing some reps just practicing that initial contact and getting used to angling your toes downwards, you may need to take the shoes off for this I'm not sure how flexible they are, and getting the blade of your foot into contact with uke's leg/calf.

    Second point, which again may be down to tiredness/shoes/both is how you reap with the leg as you make chest contact, but is probably because you're not making that initial contact with the blade of the foot.

    Your leg is remaining at a kind of half cock position with the heel up.





    What you want to be doing is sliding your leg down uke's as you close and get chest contact and then complete your reap.

    Pedro slides his leg down uke's leg quite early, I'm not sure I could get away with that without getting countered, but it demonstrates the general principle

  8. Omega Supreme is offline

    Administrator

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    22,986

    Posted On:
    7/13/2014 10:20am

    staff
     Style: Chinese Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    I'm not sure if this is a result of tiredness or whether the shoes make it harder to do, or both.

    However, your initial contact positioning with the leg is off.

    You're making loose contact with either the high calf or sometimes the back of your knee





    In randori and contest this won't give you the necessary control and pining of the leg that you need.

    You want to make firm and tight contact with your toes pointed down and the blade of you foot in contact with uke's calf





    This will ensure uke can't slip his leg out and that as you break his balance over the leg you're attacking you keep the leg and the weight pinned as you enter.

    I would recommend doing some reps just practicing that initial contact and getting used to angling your toes downwards, you may need to take the shoes off for this I'm not sure how flexible they are, and getting the blade of your foot into contact with uke's leg/calf.

    Second point, which again may be down to tiredness/shoes/both is how you reap with the leg as you make chest contact, but is probably because you're not making that initial contact with the blade of the foot.

    Your leg is remaining at a kind of half cock position with the heel up.





    What you want to be doing is sliding your leg down uke's as you close and get chest contact and then complete your reap.

    Pedro slides his leg down uke's leg quite early, I'm not sure I could get away with that without getting countered, but it demonstrates the general principle
    I can't agree with your analysis here. He only allows space once maybe twice but there is contact before he starts the throw. While I agree with about his calf contact I don't agree on the placement.

    I used to believe this dogmatic approach until I had a high ranking Judoka show me a different way. I show kids your version I show the adults both versions. I even use a third version.
  9. judoka_uk is offline
    judoka_uk's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    England
    Posts
    4,619

    Posted On:
    7/14/2014 5:48pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Supreme View Post
    I can't agree with your analysis here. He only allows space once maybe twice but there is contact before he starts the throw. While I agree with about his calf contact I don't agree on the placement.

    I used to believe this dogmatic approach until I had a high ranking Judoka show me a different way. I show kids your version I show the adults both versions. I even use a third version.
    I'm afraid I have to advance a contrary opionion.

    You're right that all too often, in Judo. poor technique becomes codified as dogma.

    However, in this instance we have both Jimmy Pedro and Yasuhiro Yamashita in agreement. They are both hugely experienced and knowlegable Judoka and they are both not afraid to challenge dogma.

    The fact both advocate the same method should be an indication that it is not dogmatic to advocate this approach, rather that it is the approach that will work the most often, for the most people in realistic scenarios.

    This is a fundamental feature of what a lot of people call Judo dogma. Technique X performed in method Y is usually done because for 90% of people that will work 90% of the time. The adaptations are a result of the few rare instances where the canonical methods fail.

    I would put the ball back in your court and say, if you have an alternative method that you believe will work for the majority of people, in the majority of situations then please describe it and provide the supporting instructional images/video. That way blackmonk can make an informed decision on whether your method or tried and tested method works better for him.
  10. BKR is offline
    BKR's Avatar

    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bonners Ferry, Idaho
    Posts
    4,476

    Posted On:
    7/14/2014 7:15pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by cereus View Post
    After reading this thread and the kani basami one I'm worried I might injure someone's knee with osoto gari, I do bjj and we drill throws/takedowns a lot but mostly only spar with them leading up to competition. So I'm asking out of concern for my training partners (for when we next spar from standing) and hope you can forgive me if I don't communicate this well.

    When I drill I reap the leg in a very straight line in the direction the knee bends naturally but the part I am concerned about is pulling uke's sleeve towards me and pushing away with the hand on the collar, I'm worried this could cause a twisting motion and hurt uke's knee. It's probably a more basic point than this thread merits but it seemed better than starting a new thread.
    Not sure what you mean by "pushing away with the hand on the collar". There isn't any need to push uke away from you. Instead, you should be holding uke close and controlling the head/upper body with your collar hand, whether it is a normal collar grip,high collar grip, or a deeper version.

    Pushing away is a common flaw in my experience. Especially in BJJ, where you want/need to maintain control all the way to the ground and presumably end up in some sort of control position (pin).
    Falling for Judo since 1980
Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 678 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.