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  1. Euripides is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    18

    Posted On:
    6/13/2014 7:08am


     Style: Boxing and Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Ideal wrist angle to avoid breaks off punches

    I was curious about the experience of other forum members in respect of wrist angle when punching.

    I used to train Muay Thai when I was young and they always taught us to punch with a straight wrist, i.e. without bending up or down.

    I then started training at a boxing gym where they taught us to punch with the wrists slightly bent downwards which initially seemed like a poor choice, but which they explained quite well.

    My boxing gym's argument was basically that the real risk from injury comes from the wrist shooting up and that it's easier to absorb more force this way. Also that a proper hook throw should have the elbow slightly high than the fist and be connecting almost downards (the fist being downards, not the arc of the punch). Other boxing gyms seem to favor the slight wrist bend, but I've also seen boxers say they prefer a straight wrist.

    To me the bend seems like it's practical and does absorb force better, but I'm amazed how their can be two schools of thought on this. It seems like something that should be objective, no?

    I was curious what experience other strikers on the forum have, and what they've found to be best for absorbing force and avoiding injury of missed or clipped shots when sparring. Thanks in advance!!
  2. soft touch is online now

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    119

    Posted On:
    6/24/2014 7:25am


     Style: Goju Ryu/Balintawak Arnis

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Euripides View Post
    I was curious about the experience of other forum members in respect of wrist angle when punching.

    I used to train Muay Thai when I was young and they always taught us to punch with a straight wrist, i.e. without bending up or down.

    I then started training at a boxing gym where they taught us to punch with the wrists slightly bent downwards which initially seemed like a poor choice, but which they explained quite well.

    My boxing gym's argument was basically that the real risk from injury comes from the wrist shooting up and that it's easier to absorb more force this way. Also that a proper hook throw should have the elbow slightly high than the fist and be connecting almost downards (the fist being downards, not the arc of the punch). Other boxing gyms seem to favor the slight wrist bend, but I've also seen boxers say they prefer a straight wrist.

    To me the bend seems like it's practical and does absorb force better, but I'm amazed how their can be two schools of thought on this. It seems like something that should be objective, no?

    I was curious what experience other strikers on the forum have, and what they've found to be best for absorbing force and avoiding injury of missed or clipped shots when sparring. Thanks in advance!!
    Personally I've always used the straight wrist, partly because that's the traditional Japanese theory, and partly because I love my body shots, and with a wrist bend I can't liver punch for ****.
    As well as the above, I've tried punching heavy bags with a bent wrist, and though it feels different on the wrist, I wouldn't necessarily say it was *better*, and I can't deliver as much force that way.
    Just my two cents.
    (oh and it isn't usually THAT much of an issue for me in sparring, but I use body shots a LOT, and clipping on the body has only given me grief on my wrists a few times)
    p.s. i have nice flexible wrists which might also help, no alternative experience for me to tell if it does

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