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  1. searcher66071 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    611

    Posted On:
    6/30/2014 3:05pm


     Style: Karate-knockdown, BJJ

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by gregaquaman View Post
    How do you not cripple people in sparring?
    Control is a pretty big part of it, but I tend to throw mine with the flat of the foot while sparring. It is still pretty rough on your sparring partners, but exponentially better than the heal making contact. I spent several years working it against a bag and the air prior to using it while sparring. It sucked to work it so much and not use it right away, but it payed off in the long run.



    McClaw:
    As far as set-up for the lead leg goes, I use jabs and "gimpy" backfists to get my hips into position, after working my opponent towards a corner. It makes it higher percentage, but it is still not super high. I have also used it directly after a clinch, but this faded once my spinning hook and axe kick came along. More often than not, the lead hood should be used as a defensive kick, IMO. If you have the speed and flexibility to work it that way. It works well in a knockdown karate situation. Kickboxing, less so, as opponents tend to have lazy hands in KD tourneys.
  2. Piff is online now

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    8

    Posted On:
    11/12/2014 9:01pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Tae Kwon Do

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have a ridiculously hard time with this kick since returning to tkd but I feel its mostly flexibility issues
  3. RealFolkBlues is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    21

    Posted On:
    12/24/2014 4:24pm


     Style: Tang Soo Do

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    So I'll chip in, here, being another Korean art practitioner. We like our kicks, as you may have heard.

    For conditioning, I would suggest working on the obliques and hamstrings. It sounds like you're already doing some good stuff, especially as you seem to be throwing the kick itself a lot, but I would definitely concentrate on those areas if you're planning on doing some technique-specific workouts. Oblique jackknives are fantastic, as are woodchoppers, and good old leg curls work well for the hamstring, natch. Flexibility-wise I would recommend side lunges.

    As to 180 or 360 degree spins, I think of it almost as a hybrid. The way I teach it to junior belts is to rapidly turn 180 degrees, lean over and fire the kick, and then use the momentum of the leg snap to finish the spin. That way you get the full power of a big spin with the better balance and less work of the smaller spin. Personally I also like having the same stance before and after the kick, though the 180 is pretty great for switching your stance if you want to do that.

    Setup-wise, the jab->spin hook is definitely the mainstay, but I'm also a big fan of this kick after a low kick from either leg, though primarily the back leg. That is most definitely a great way to get somebody to back the hell up, too, so works wonders for pushing someone up against the wall or corner. This kick is also great when circling, cuz you can disguise the setup with a step, especially when you combine it with a punch.

    I like that body kick afterwards. What kick are you using mainly? Front? Round? I find another nice thing about this kick is because of the distance that it usually creates, you can fire some of the bigger motions off, like step behind/skipping side kick or spinning back kick.

    I love to rush up and crowd people who fire spinning kicks in the (generally successful) attempt to take their back. What do you guys do to counter this?
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