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  1. #1
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Okinawan Jujutsu.

    Greetings Bullshido!

    I have no experience in martial arts. Recently, I decided to go about acquiring some. I've been searching around the Michiana area, and I eventually found out about something called "Okinawan Jujutsu." Here's a description of it I found online.

    "This art form is not a sport. Rather, it is used strictly for self-defense purposes. Ideal for men and women wanting to become more capable of protecting themselves and others by implementing strikes to the vital areas of the body and throwing techniques designed to devastate attackers."

    I've been informed that there are a lot of seriously lousy martial arts schools in the US, so I decided to do some research into it and attend a few sessions. Here's what I've figured out.

    The instructor's a guy named Rick Hamilton. He was featured in a South Bend Tribune article titled "No trophies, just survival." Aside from the fact that the article contains a lot of posturing, everything I've read about Sacharnoski suggests that he was not as great as he claimed to be. Hamilton claims to have been trained by him. Hamilton was also on More Than Human demonstrating something called "Combat Ki." As near as I can tell, this is even more posturing. With that said, it seems Hamilton does have a record of teaching martial arts to law enforcement. Of course, cops aren't known for being the best fighters on the planet. It's not their job to be. It would be possible for them to get fooled.

    With that said, the students I've observed seem to be level headed, serious, and well trained. I've watched some of them sparring, and it seemed pretty impressive. This could be due to due to my lack of knowledge on the subject, Hamilton's skill as an instructor, or just the talent of the students. Hamilton's being a good self-promoter doesn't mean he can't be a good martial arts instructor.

    The sessions I have attended have been very basic. I've been learning introductory blocking and wristlocks. Supposedly these are the things that will follow you through Okinawan Jujutsu. The blocking was similar to the "360 defense" from Discovery Channel's Human Weapon.

    As I have no prior experience in martial arts, I have no real knowledge of whether or not blocking and wristlocks are considered effective techniques or not. When the other students were practicing with me, their wristlocks seemed effective. This could have been due to their skill or my lack thereof.

    My research and training has left me with a few questions. Is "Okinawan Jujutsu" worth practicing, or is it a total waste of my time? Does anyone have any experience with this art? Is its relation to Juko Kai a good sign that I should train elsewhere?

  2. #2
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Okinawan Jujutsu.

    Greetings Bullshido!

    I have no experience in martial arts. Recently, I decided to go about acquiring some. I've been searching around the Michiana area, and I eventually found out about something called "Okinawan Jujutsu." Here's a description of it I found online.

    "This art form is not a sport. Rather, it is used strictly for self-defense purposes. Ideal for men and women wanting to become more capable of protecting themselves and others by implementing strikes to the vital areas of the body and throwing techniques designed to devastate attackers."

    I've been informed that there are a lot of seriously lousy martial arts schools in the US, so I decided to do some research into it and attend a few sessions. Here's what I've figured out.

    The instructor's a guy named Rick Hamilton. He was featured in a South Bend Tribune article titled "No trophies, just survival." Aside from the fact that the article contains a lot of posturing, everything I've read about Sacharnoski suggests that he was not as great as he claimed to be. Hamilton claims to have been trained by him. Hamilton was also on More Than Human demonstrating something called "Combat Ki." As near as I can tell, this is even more posturing. With that said, it seems Hamilton does have a record of teaching martial arts to law enforcement. Of course, cops aren't known for being the best fighters on the planet. It's not their job to be. It would be possible for them to get fooled.

    With that said, the students I've observed seem to be level headed, serious, and well trained. I've watched some of them sparring, and it seemed pretty impressive. This could be due to due to my lack of knowledge on the subject, Hamilton's skill as an instructor, or just the talent of the students. Hamilton's being a good self-promoter doesn't mean he can't be a good martial arts instructor.

    The sessions I have attended have been very basic. I've been learning introductory blocking and wristlocks. Supposedly these are the things that will follow you through Okinawan Jujutsu. The blocking was similar to the "360 defense" from Discovery Channel's Human Weapon.

    As I have no prior experience in martial arts, I have no real knowledge of whether or not blocking and wristlocks are considered effective techniques or not. When the other students were practicing with me, their wristlocks seemed effective. This could have been due to their skill or my lack thereof.

    My research and training has left me with a few questions. Is "Okinawan Jujutsu" worth practicing, or is it a total waste of my time? Does anyone have any experience with this art? Is its relation to Juko Kai a good sign that I should train elsewhere?

  3. #3
    ghost55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    4,142
    Style
    Kyokushin/BJJ
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Welcome to Bullshido!
    I would go find something else. Wristlocks are generally a waste of time more often than not. Also the phrase "combat ki" might be the biggest "say away" signs that I have ever seen.

  4. #4
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ghost55 View Post
    Welcome to Bullshido!
    I would go find something else. Wristlocks are generally a waste of time more often than not. Also the phrase "combat ki" might be the biggest "say away" signs that I have ever seen.
    Thanks for the advice. I figured "combat ki" wasn't anything useful, but I hadn't seen it used in "Okinawan jujutsu" yet. I was wondering if "combat ki" was a sign that the instructor was a fraud, or just a sign that he was good at advertising.

  5. #5
    Permalost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    San Diego
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    14,366
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    street paddleboarding
    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Juko kai has been discussed quite a bit here. Here's a thread:
    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=9116

  6. #6
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    size stdsms

    So aside from "combat ki," it's mostly judo with a little bit of karate?

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Southeast WI
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    892
    Style
    aikido
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Definitely run away from Combat Ki.

  8. #8
    slamdunc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    2,537
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    TKD, CMA & American Kenpo
    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Welcome to Bullshido.
    Quote Originally Posted by ghost55 View Post
    Wristlocks are generally a waste of time more often than not.
    ghost generalized a bit when he said "more often than not". Wristlocks can be of use if and when you are that particular range (clinch and sometimes grapple). For the most part, they are pretty useless.
    Quote Originally Posted by OwlMatt View Post
    Definitely run away from Combat Ki.
    ^^^THIS^^^ The things that would scare me off are the affiliation with Sacharnoski and the 'Too Deadly For Competition' mentality. As for training law enforcement; it is pretty common that anyone with a martial arts school and even one cop in their class to say they train law enforcement.
    Most police departments don't know the difference between good and bad training. They can say they sent their guys to training, no matter how lame it may be.


    Quote Originally Posted by Devil View Post
    You can not intellectualize your way to being a competent fighter.

  9. #9
    Chili Pepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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    2,452
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    Siling Labuyo Arnis
    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NightsWatch View Post
    With that said, it seems Hamilton does have a record of teaching martial arts to law enforcement. Of course, cops aren't known for being the best fighters on the planet. It's not their job to be. It would be possible for them to get fooled.
    "Teaching martial arts to law enforcement" tends to be a red flag for me. I've taught all sorts of police over the years, but I'd never put that on my CV. It's a blatant attempt to show legitimacy, with little to back it up.

  10. #10
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by slamdunc View Post
    Welcome to Bullshido.
    ghost generalized a bit when he said "more often than not". Wristlocks can be of use if and when you are that particular range (clinch and sometimes grapple). For the most part, they are pretty useless.
    ^^^THIS^^^ The things that would scare me off are the affiliation with Sacharnoski and the 'Too Deadly For Competition' mentality. As for training law enforcement; it is pretty common that anyone with a martial arts school and even one cop in their class to say they train law enforcement.
    Most police departments don't know the difference between good and bad training. They can say they sent their guys to training, no matter how lame it may be.
    Thanks for the help. Do you know of any good martial arts training in Michiana?

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