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  1. rnc357 is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/21/2014 1:57am


     Style: dead lifting

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Tai chi question/advice

    Hope I am posting this in the right area. My main MA background is in TJJ and submission wrestling. I recently gave up grappling after many years due to nagging injuries. I still lift weights quite a bit, work in a fairly physical trade and work a part time job bouncing in a bar. I am in my mid 40s. I am in decent shape but have a lot of muscle, joint and tendon pain. Also a few old injuries that never healed quite right.
    My questions are, can tai chi help relieve some of this pain. I was thinking of yoga but would rather do a MA. Also does tai chi have any value as a fighting art or is it mainly a theraputic art. Thanks for any replies.

    http://tctaichi.org/
    This is the place I am looking at going to.
    Last edited by rnc357; 4/21/2014 2:00am at .
  2. Alexatron is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/21/2014 4:36am

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     Style: Baguazhang

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    Yes & Yes

    I have a long background in MA and have collected a few injuries along the way (I'm in my 50's and started out when I was 16). I've been practicing/studying Tai Chi for two years now and my personal experience has been that it has helped a lot with my injuries. My main injuries are a shoulder injury from Japanese Jiu Jitsu, knee injuries from Karate & Taekwondo and a foot injury from Karate. The foot is still a bit weak but getting stronger, the shoulder hardly gives me any pain now and my knees have improved significantly. I attribute a lot of the recovery to the additional qigong exercises I've learnt with Tai Chi so you want to ensure any school/class includes those. The main ones I've learn so far are 8 pieces of brocade, Dragon/Tiger qigong sets and the 8 harmonies. Our school also teaches the martial applications hidden within the Tai Chi forms (I'm studying the Chen style). Based on my previous experience I believe the applications are practicable though not had the misfortune to have to use them for real yet. You might have to try a few classes with different teachers before you find one teaching the good oil - I checked out a few before finding a teacher that knew more than just the external moves. Good luck with your journey and I hope my comments are helpful.
  3. ChenPengFi is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/23/2014 12:49am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hung Gar, Choy Lay Fut

    6
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by rnc357 View Post
    My questions are, can tai chi help relieve some of this pain.
    Perhaps. Always see a Dr first.

    Then perhaps spend some time learning about chronic pain.
    Some good links here:
    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=121734


    Also you might look into the work of Moshe Feldenkrais. He was a Sorbonne trained scientist and accomplished Judoka who used movement and body awareness to treat pain and dysfunction. While some of his work (or perhaps more accurately, some of what his eventual followers would assert) is a bit "out there", i think the basic premises are valuable.

    If you search the somasimple.com forums for "novel stimulus" you may find some interesting and valuable info.




    Also does tai chi have any value as a fighting art or is it mainly a theraputic art. Thanks for any replies.

    http://tctaichi.org/
    This is the place I am looking at going to.

    "It depends."
    Logically those are two different goals, fighting and healing, despite what many people will try to convince you of.
    Good fighting TCC/TJQ is essentially a form of wrestling.

    Tim Cartmell is a BJJ blackbelt and TCC/TJQ practitioner who would probably be a good "fighting Taichi" instructor.
    I personally think the "invisible jiu-jitsu" thing has a lot in common with core TCC/TJQ concepts.
    I'm not sure how well a more austere approach would help with chronic pain however.

    Be clear on your goals!

    I tend to think softer, flowing, free-form types of push-hands (pain free novel stimulus) are best for easing pain as opposed to rigid forms(repetitive motion) or getting thrown(impact).

    That site doesn't tell me much.

    Good luck and again i can't stress this enough, be clear on your goals.
  4. rnc357 is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/23/2014 7:43am


     Style: dead lifting

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    Thank you very much for responding, Your advice and the info. you have provided is greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by rnc357; 4/23/2014 7:46am at .
  5. Alexatron is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/23/2014 6:41pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Baguazhang

    1
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    Tai Chi helped me

    Fingers crossed this post gets through the spam filters - my last attempt got lost in transit.

    I've personally found Tai Chi and it's sister art Baguazhang a great help in relieving pain from injuries picked up from 30+ years of abusing my body. Of particular help has been Dragon/Tiger qigong sets (really helped my weak knees). Other therapeutic sets include the Eight Pieces of Brocade (helped free up my neck and spine) and another set I only know as the '15 set' which I think is a Bagua set but well worth tracking down as a general low impact stretching and limbering up set. I've been at it about two years now so hope to get more benefit as time progresses.

    In answer to your second question the classes I attend include the martial applications of the Tai Chi forms as well as weapons training. The applications seem practicable based on my experience though I've thankfully not needed to put them to the test yet.

    Quote Originally Posted by rnc357 View Post
    My questions are, can tai chi help relieve some of this pain. I was thinking of yoga but would rather do a MA. Also does tai chi have any value as a fighting art or is it mainly a theraputic art. Thanks for any replies.

    This is the place I am looking at going to.
    Good luck on your journey.

    Alex
  6. GRomel is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/17/2014 10:49pm


     Style: Flowing Combat

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Tai Chi has a very high value as a fighting art, the challenge is finding a school that trains it as such. I can send you an instructional video for shipping cost, just send me a PM with your info.

    Best,

    Gary
  7. Sri Hanuman is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/05/2014 9:28am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Cheng Man Ching Taijiquan

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Honestly, if you are looking for Taiji qigong, almost any school at a nearby strip mall will help, and most will teach you the Beijing 24 movement form, which is an amalgamation of the 5 prominent Taiji styles.

    If your goal is physical recovery, that's as simple an advice as I can offer.
    If however, you are looking to apply Taijiquan as a fighting art, you are in for quite a bit of searching, since there is quite a bit of BS in the TJQ world, which sadly is more prominent than quality instruction. (I blame in part the new-agers that helped the BS spread. If you see a hippie, punch him for me brah.)

    Hope this has been of some value, comrade.
    Post some school links that you are looking into, and just for shits and giggles, look up Master Wong Tai Chi.
    =================
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  8. Bezmond is online now

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    Posted On:
    7/05/2014 12:14pm


     Style: Taijiquan, Karate

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sri Hanuman View Post
    just for shits and giggles, look up Master Wong Tai Chi.
    AND THAT'S HOW YOU USE WHITE CRANE SPREADS WINGS TO **** UP 3 GUYS!!!DID THAT ANSWER YOUR QUESTION??? I love Master Wong.

    So...is the "Beijing" 24 step form different to the Yang 24 step? I'd lazily assumed they were the same. Can you post me a link to what you're talking about? I'm interested in this amalgamation business.
  9. Sri Hanuman is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/05/2014 12:31pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Cheng Man Ching Taijiquan

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bezmond View Post
    AND THAT'S HOW YOU USE WHITE CRANE SPREADS WINGS TO **** UP 3 GUYS!!!DID THAT ANSWER YOUR QUESTION??? I love Master Wong.

    So...is the "Beijing" 24 step form different to the Yang 24 step? I'd lazily assumed they were the same. Can you post me a link to what you're talking about? I'm interested in this amalgamation business.
    Happy to, comrade.
    You are correct, this is the very same form.
    I've seen a fraud or two refer to it as the 24 movement style. Instant red flag.

    Basically this is strictly for sports/fitness.

    This is one of the rare times I'll lazily point to Wikipedia as a source.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-form_tai_chi_chuan

    The form was the result of an effort by the Chinese Sports Committee, which, in 1956, brought together four t'ai chi teachers - Chu Guiting, Cai Longyun, Fu Zhongwen, and Zhang Yu - to create a simplified form of t'ai chi as exercise for the masses. The creators truncated the traditional family style t'ai chi forms to 24 postures; taking about six minutes to perform and to give the beginner an introduction to the essential elements of t'ai chi ch'uan, yet retain the traditional flavor of traditional longer hand forms (in general, 88-108 postures). Henceforth, this form was avidly promoted by the People's Republic of China for general exercise, and was also taught to internees in Communist "re-education" camps. Due to this official promotion, the 24-form is most likely the t'ai chi-form with the most practitioners in China and the world over (though no surveys have been performed).
    I should ammend this with the fact that any instructor who knows his Taijiquan can do a whole "application of the 24 movements" curriculum, meaning shuai-jiao, chin-na, and striking applications for each of the movements. Doesn't make this one a style, and anyone claiming otherwise is either bullshidoka, or mislead by their instructor.
    =================
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  10. Cake of Doom is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/05/2014 8:59pm


     Style: Holiday Judo

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Woman of Doom has 2 herniated discs; I asked a similar question a while back. She's been practicing the short form for, roughly, about a year and a half now and she has found it a great help. It's helped with her posture, joint movement and over all stress levels. She's still rubbish at fighting but she has a worlds worth of movement back and for that, I'm more than thankful.
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