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  1. jnp is offline
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    Titanium laced beauty

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    Posted On:
    4/08/2014 10:13pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ, wrestling

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I typically teach no more than two similar techniques, like the tripod and sickle sweeps, or a chain like Blackmonk described.

    I should note that I teach a fundamentals class. Occasionally, when all that show up are my two more experienced students, I'll select a few more advanced moves. Even then though, I stick to no more than two techniques.

    I can remember being totally lost in class as a white and blue belt when my former instructor would demonstrate four or five moves. I never absorbed more than 1 or 2 of them.

    I would rather my students be good at 10 techniques than mediocre at 30.
  2. daishi is online now

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    Posted On:
    4/08/2014 10:23pm


     Style: Aikido/JJJ/Judo/GoJu Ryu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I like learning that way as well. I was taught Ko/O Soto/Uchi gari all at the same time...**** was real confusing...and that was just a naming issue, let alone actual complex movements.

    I really like when we teach formulaic and theme based. For example we've been working just spider guard for a couple weeks. But I also like breaking down and seeing how a technique is countered. There's no worse feeling than being all excited at attempting a new technique in randori and just getting rocked. I also feel I learn how something works if I learn how it's blocked or reversed.

    I like the idea of having separate class types, like a fundamentals class, a conditioning class, etc. Unfortunately my school has multiple arts going so there's time conflicts. But the schools on my teachers property and all the black belts have keys, so we get together in off time and train semi frequently.
  3. NeilG is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/08/2014 11:07pm


     Style: Kendo

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Daishi - seitei is iaido. Kendo has paired kata with bokuto.
  4. daishi is online now

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    Posted On:
    4/09/2014 12:19am


     Style: Aikido/JJJ/Judo/GoJu Ryu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    Daishi - seitei is iaido. Kendo has paired kata with bokuto.
    I see. It was my understanding that, in 1969, the All Japan Kendo Federation (AJKF) formed a committee that standardized what eventually would become the current seitei gata (starting with six, then eventually all 12 by 2000). I think it was done to create a bridge between classical iai schools and kendo schools. I believe not all kendo schools teach the seitei, which isn't surprising. This is all hearsay from iaido (no kendo near me, sadly), and from the Canadian Kendo Federation Website.
  5. NeilG is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/09/2014 8:00am


     Style: Kendo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    How much material do you cover in a class

    CKF administers kendo iaido and jodo. AJKF does the same. Iaido is not formally part of the kendo curriculum but there are a lot of people that do both. I'm not one of them, iaido is not my thing. My instructor dabbles, unranked but he could probably pass a 1 or 2 dan exam. His instructor is 8 dan kendo, 7 dan iaido. His instructor's instructor was hanshi both kendo and iaido.

    I'm on the CKF BOD so any other Qs feel free. Website is not the greatest I know.
    Last edited by NeilG; 4/09/2014 8:06am at .
  6. daishi is online now

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    Posted On:
    4/09/2014 9:37am


     Style: Aikido/JJJ/Judo/GoJu Ryu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ok, good to know. I probably wasn't listening carefully at that seminar. I really wish there was kendo around here. I have fun with Iaido when my friends push me to do it, but I lack the motivation to train in it regularly with the 45 min drive to the dojo and the fact I'm already there 4x a week.
  7. etali is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/13/2014 8:47am


     Style: BJJ, Wrestling, Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I train(ed) a few different arts, and each takes a different approach:

    Karate - this has a clear structure of "learn this set of moves for your next belt test" so you learn those moves over the course of a few lessons then spend months drilling them.


    Judo (I don't train this any more because I have a neck injury that gets aggravated by the repeated throws) - the lesson was 1.5 hours long, and you'd spend probably 45 minutes of that learning throws/sweeps - the instructor would spend just a few minutes on each one so you'd cover a TON of different moves in one lesson. The pace was so fast that I spent most of my time being confused and couldn't retain more than a couple of moves from week to week.

    Wrestling - my BJJ gym has an awesome wrestling coach who teaches wrestling from the perspective of how it would be useful for BJJ. Most of the class are beginners, so he'll pick one move, or two at most, to focus on for the class. E.g. he might spend an entire lesson on how to set up and execute a single leg. We drill over and over, first at our own pace, then to a call.

    BJJ - in BJJ we start with mobility drills, then the instructor will do a series of related moves. For example an arm bar from mount followed by what to do if the person attempts to defend in various ways. Typically we'll cover 3-4 moves in a lesson, and they're all related so it's not as confusing as Judo was. The moves we learn from lesson to lesson are rarely related though - so we might spend Monday learning how to choke people once you get their back, then Tuesdays learning escapes from mount, and go weeks before you do a lesson on "how to take the back from X position" everything gets covered eventually but sometimes the order doesn't make much sense.

    MMA/Muay Thai - the striking classes I take these days tend to have a theme - e.g. all about clinch work or teeps, elbows, whatever. Lots of drilling of one type of move, at first with a technique focus, then later we'll do power/speed drills with the same kind of moves.
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