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  1. CrackFox is offline
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    You have to work the look.

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    Posted On:
    3/14/2014 9:17am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ack, I meant to say ko-uchi.

    Is ko-soto a goer Neil? How does it work? I'm envisioning a situation where they've side stepped you completely and you attack the close leg as your sweeping leg comes back down.
  2. fakejudoka is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/14/2014 9:58am


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I struggle with changing direction. Meaning when I go for uchi mata it is difficult for me to switch to a rear throw. You could use what we refer to as double stab. Enter for uchi mata and then stab the leg across for tai otoshi.
  3. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/14/2014 11:51am


     Style: Kendo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by CrackFox View Post
    Ack, I meant to say ko-uchi.

    Is ko-soto a goer Neil? How does it work? I'm envisioning a situation where they've side stepped you completely and you attack the close leg as your sweeping leg comes back down.
    No, I screwed up too. Ko-uchi-gari or o-uchi-gari is what I meant to say. Basically, you've got your attacking leg inside uke's legs and are switching directions depending on what he does.

    Although I suppose ko-soto could work in the situation you describe, especially if he's pulling back after you swish. Uchi-mata is not my throw, so I'm just theorizing. Uchi-mata/o-uchi/ko-uchi is box-stock combination work, that's why I know that one.
    Last edited by NeilG; 3/14/2014 11:55am at .
  4. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    3/19/2014 9:37am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by fakejudoka View Post
    I struggle with changing direction. Meaning when I go for uchi mata it is difficult for me to switch to a rear throw. You could use what we refer to as double stab. Enter for uchi mata and then stab the leg across for tai otoshi.
    Then design some drills to help you get better at changing direction. That might range from basic agility training to judo specific drills, depending upon what your core problems are.

    Once any fundamental issues are improved, the next step is to work on the core throws in the direction - change pair, then put them together.

    Often a large part of what goes wrong is related to your uke. Changes in direction are usually related to action-reaction. If your uke does not react properly to the initial direction (be it attack or simply movement...as in move uke forward, then throw to the rear), then it is difficult to make it work. Often,again, inexperienced judoka do not know how to react to movement "properly", so it's hard to make progress.

    Uchi Mata is a tough throw to do properly by itself. If you commit, uke has to do some pretty specific stuff for you to be able to switch direction effectively. So you have to train uke to make the specific reaction for the specific second technique you want to use.

    Specific conditions have to be met for specific combinations, for example, Uchi Mata to Kouchi Gari, or Ouchi GAri, or Tai Otoshi, Ken Ken Uchi Mata, Ken Ken Ouchi Gari, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by fakejudoka View Post
    I have been doing Judo for 3 1/2 years now so you can take that into consideration.

    The first thing I would ask is this, are you a competitor or just in it for the sake of learning Judo? If you want to be a competitor, you should pick 3 or so throws that you feel comfortable with and practice them in every situation you can think of. When competing you shouldn't be wasting time on the mat trying to decide which throw you are going to attempt. You should grip and throw. If you have no plans to compete, pick the coolest throw you have been shown and practice it until it looks good.

    Personally, I consider myself a competitor. I have picked 3 or so throws that I call my go-to throws. Whenever I get the chance I practice those throws over and over.

    As far as stalling out, I would say just RELAX. If you feel you are stalling out because you get thrown in randori or because your throws aren't successful remember how long you have been training. I emphasize relax because it was only when I stopped being so tense in randori that I was actually able to do what I wanted to.

    Once you decide what you are there for you can think about a competition strategy or a learning strategy.
    What make's a throw "cool"?
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  5. fakejudoka is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/19/2014 12:48pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    For me changing direction is a mental thing. If I get in my mind that I want to throw uchi mata, I tend to end up with tunnel vision. I have and do practice counters to my throw. For example, if I try uchi mata(right sided) and uke is able to put all his weight on his right leg then I will switch to tai otoshi. I have also drilled uchi mata to o uchi gari. It's not that I can't switch directions, it's just that I have to plan on switching directions. I know it sounds weird. In general, if uchi mata fails I tend to back all the way out and then shoot back in for a combo or different throw. It is something I have to work on.

    Cool throw?
    I made that statement because I was unclear on the direction the OP wanted to go with his training. If he was not interested in competition I meant for him to pick a throw that he thought was "cool" and learn it in and out.
  6. ccwscott is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/19/2014 1:59pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Orange belt is also a good time to start looking at books and blogs and videos to pick up tips and help you remember things.

    As others have said, definitely focus on one or two techniques, and then a handful of techniques to help set those up or complement them. If someone is reasonably skilled and know what's coming you probably won't throw them, you're looking to take advantage of mistakes or force them into a bad position, and you need a handful of secondary throws to do that.

    Know how to do your main throws left sided. Practice different grips and getting a grip that you like to throw from. Read up on some counters as well and think about them during randori.
  7. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    3/19/2014 2:48pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by fakejudoka View Post
    For me changing direction is a mental thing. If I get in my mind that I want to throw uchi mata, I tend to end up with tunnel vision. I have and do practice counters to my throw. For example, if I try uchi mata(right sided) and uke is able to put all his weight on his right leg then I will switch to tai otoshi. I have also drilled uchi mata to o uchi gari. It's not that I can't switch directions, it's just that I have to plan on switching directions. I know it sounds weird. In general, if uchi mata fails I tend to back all the way out and then shoot back in for a combo or different throw. It is something I have to work on.
    No, that doesn't sound weird to me, more typical. You basically validated what I wrote to you originally. It doesn't matter if it's physical or mental, it's both together that matter. The solution is pretty much the same, work on drills to train the combos until you stop having to plan. Planning works, I do it too sometimes, but as you progress, you will learn to not plan so much and rely on the awareness of what is happening without consciously "thinking" about it cognitively.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  8. Bayonet is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/03/2014 9:42pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    So, checking back in with a progress report.

    The biggest improvement I've made is making a conscious effort to "posture up" and avoid the temptation to do the Ass-out Zombie when I get tired or don't know what to do. It's really helping my footwork and overall skillset.

    So far, I've been trying to spend my randori time with higher level belts instead of fellow orange and yellow types. I figure this will break me out of any slump I'm having and force me to compete at a higher level. I'm getting thrown like wedding rice, but I think I'm getting some really interesting and useful feedback.

    One of the biggest things I keep hearing is that I telegraph too much, and I'm a bit too deliberate. One of the black belts told me " It's like I can FEEL you thinking ' Okay...3...2...1 Uchi Mata attempt!"

    This makes complete sense. I tend to get fixated on a certain throw whenever I set into randori, and I find it difficult to quickly think of throws to attempt, or quickly think of ways to exploit opportunities. Any ways to train this? What possible drills can I do to make my brain process Judo faster?
  9. BJMills is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/03/2014 11:46pm


     Style: Muay Thai/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The best way to process judo faster is more judo. Not bring facetious either, it just comes over time.
  10. Krijgsman is online now

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    Posted On:
    4/04/2014 2:37am


     Style: Judo noob, injured guy.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm only a green belt so take this with a grain of inexperienced salt. But learning to relax and - again - get the fundamentals right have improved and sped up my Judo. Keep working on the basics of the basic throws as those mechanics will transfer to other throws in the future and build the "feel" that you need to throw/move without thinking about it. Focusing on control and technique over power and speed has helped me too.
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