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  1. Ignorami is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 11:52am


     Style: Aikido / FMA / Krotty

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Stephan Kesting over at Grapplearts.com (He's a BJJ guy) has a Yoga DVD out now aimed at martial arty types.

    A couple of the routines are available to try out free either on his site, or on the youtubez.

    The flat tone (I guess for relaxation purposes) of the lady's voice can be a bit grating for my taste, but otherwise seems great to me. Good looking yoga workouts targeted at specific areas. She does it the full-on way, while Stephan does the slightly easier versions next to her.


    When life gives you lemons... BLOOD FOR THE BLOOD GOD!!

    "what's the best thing about aikido then?"
    "To be defeated by your enemies, to be driven by them from the field of battle, and to hear the lamentations of your women." ermghoti
  2. Meriakh is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 12:45pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by searcher66071 View Post
    The schools you are referring to are all a part of Leo Pecchana's group and they are very legit. I am not sure which one you are looking at, but they are all very good. I am from the area as well, though I don't train with Leo's group. If you are looking at something along the lines of Judo or Sambo, I train at Welcome Mat Elite over in the Leawood area and they are highly repsected in the area for Judo and Sambo. I also train BJJ, but I am from Pedro Sauer lineage.

    Where are you located? There are some very good options in the area.
    For some reason the mods didn't let through the location info I told you. Going to try one more time. I'm located in the Lawrence area - I would prefer not to travel outside the city but if I have to, then I will do so.
  3. goodlun is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 1:15pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I would suggest taking at least a few classes in person if your going to do yoga before moving on to DVDs and you tube. That being said their is a lot and I mean a lot of free you tube videos to be had.
  4. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 2:11pm


     Style: Kendo

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by wingchunx2z View Post
    Well from my perspective and having spoken with representatives of each, Judo has a higher learning curve and requires more of a beating to get down. In fact, the first few weeks you're really going to take some bruises just learning how to fall correctly.

    After that, It seems to be much more difficult to master the standing throws than the ground maneuvers of BJJ.

    I believe this is most likely do to the aspects of grip fighting and off balancing that's required in judo where as BJJ it's much easier to accomplish from the ground since you're already so close to each other.

    All in all I personally find that the hardest I have to work in a class is during wrestling. Then Muay Thai, then Judo, then BJJ.

    Keep in mind though, Despite having been exposed t it and doing several club classes and lessons from ppl at meet ups and events. I've only recently started taking Judo in a curriculum style format and after my second class I've had to take a break as a I injured my hip.

    You can certainly play an aggressive competition style of BJJ but it's nature of guard work and "wait for the right opportunity to go" approach gives you the option of playing in a much more relaxed and less energy expending way than Judo or Sambo groundwork.

    It's my opinion that if you take two normal semi athletic people and stick one in BJJ and one in Judo. After 6 months of training The BJJ will most likely be able to actually perform more of what he's been training than the Judo guy. It seems to require longer and more work for Judo to get the same results.
    So, no direct experience with judo then. FWIW, beginner's instruction in breakfalls is quite safe and pain-free. Any dojo that is teaching grip-fighting to beginners has anal-cranial insertion problems IMNSHO. Judo and BJJ students assuredly do not end up in the same place in the end, unless they cross-train.
  5. Meriakh is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 2:22pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    So, no direct experience with judo then. FWIW, beginner's instruction in breakfalls is quite safe and pain-free. Any dojo that is teaching grip-fighting to beginners has anal-cranial insertion problems IMNSHO. Judo and BJJ students assuredly do not end up in the same place in the end, unless they cross-train.
    Neil, you are saying that Judo and BJJ students do not end up in the same place. What are the differences between these two styles? What does a Judo student get vs a BJJ student, and vice-versa?
  6. wingchunx2z is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 2:27pm


     Style: Wing Chun

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    So, no direct experience with judo then. FWIW, beginner's instruction in breakfalls is quite safe and pain-free. Any dojo that is teaching grip-fighting to beginners has anal-cranial insertion problems IMNSHO. Judo and BJJ students assuredly do not end up in the same place in the end, unless they cross-train.
    Well, you'd certainly have a much better position of reference than me, but for me breakfall training was quite uncomfortable and I can only speak from my own admittedly limited experience.

    Beyond your obvious Judo experience what with being a black belt and all do you have any BJJ experience to have as a reference for comparing the two art's learning curve?

    That was my only reason for commenting is that I have had experience with both arts and found at the beginning stages that BJJ was far easier to pick up and less painful to train.
  7. goodlun is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 2:35pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by wingchunx2z View Post
    Well, you'd certainly have a much better position of reference than me, but for me breakfall training was quite uncomfortable and I can only speak from my own admittedly limited experience.
    When you have very limited experience perhaps you shouldn't speak from it at all.
    You are giving advise to someone about something you just admitted that you know **** all about. In a place where they can get advise from people who's experience is far from limited.

    Quote Originally Posted by wingchunx2z View Post
    That was my only reason for commenting is that I have had experience with both arts and found at the beginning stages that BJJ was far easier to pick up and less painful to train.
    Apparently not enough experience. So maybe this is the time you should just shut the **** up and let the experts talk.
  8. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 2:37pm


     Style: Kendo

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by wingchunx2z View Post
    Well, you'd certainly have a much better position of reference than me, but for me breakfall training was quite uncomfortable and I can only speak from my own admittedly limited experience.

    Beyond your obvious Judo experience what with being a black belt and all do you have any BJJ experience to have as a reference for comparing the two art's learning curve?

    That was my only reason for commenting is that I have had experience with both arts and found at the beginning stages that BJJ was far easier to pick up and less painful to train.
    You'll note I didn't actually compare the two arts learning curve, as I don't have any direct experience with BJJ. I addressed your mistakes with judo training, and I'm familiar with the differences between the two so I made the statement about where they end up.
  9. ermghoti is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 2:48pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ+Sanda

    7
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by wingchunx2z View Post
    I take offense to this, Girl scouts have nothing to do with wing chun or chi sao. Chi sao is a drill to improve a skill set, much like skipping rope is for boxing. Oh wait, little girls skip rope also...
    Skipping rope is an exercise. chi sao is purported to be a drill to develop fighting skill.

    Take boxing twice a week for a year, and you'll know how to fight. Chun twice a week for a year, and you will know how to do drills with other chunners.

    Take boxing twice a week for ten years, you'll be someone that almost nobody wants to fight. Chun twice a week for ten years, and you'll occasionally boast on the Internet about beating a n00b at chun drills.
    Quote Originally Posted by strikistanian View Post
    DROP SEIONAGI ************! Except I don't know Judo, so it doesn't work, and he takes my back.
  10. doofaloofa is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 2:57pm

    supporting member
     Style: mma

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ermghoti View Post
    Skipping rope is an exercise. chi sao is purported to be a drill to develop fighting skill.

    Take boxing twice a week for a year, and you'll know how to fight. Chun twice a week for a year, and you will know how to do drills with other chunners.
    It's only been 6 months for me and my skipping has definatly improved
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