223809 Bullies, 3560 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 51 to 60 of 92
Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst ... 23456 78910 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Plasma is offline
    Plasma's Avatar

    Bullshido Admin

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,058

    Posted On:
    3/09/2014 7:11am

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: 柔術

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.HoneyBadger View Post
    "I don't tap to leg locks"? What the hell? Hahaha

    They say that because they view it's inferior? Like they wont be caught in them?
    I have heard numerous stories over the years. At this point I don’t know what is true. I would take this all with a grain of salt. But I have heard a few times that in Brazil, Gracie Students where traditionally the upper classes and Luta Livre was for the the lower class. Luta Livre was No-Gi and focused on a lot of leg locks. Gracie students used the Gi and didn’t use Leg Locks. Leg Locks were a “poor man’s technique.”
  2. ChenPengFi is offline
    ChenPengFi's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Hawai'i
    Posts
    3,226

    Posted On:
    3/09/2014 2:06pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hung Gar, Choy Lay Fut

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "Study: In-office MRI leads to more back surgeries"

    http://www.healthimaging.com/topics/...back-surgeries

    "When used for the appropriate indications, MRI is a valuable tool in the evaluation and management of knee pain. However, it may provide clinically irrelevant information by identifying pathology that is not related to a patient's symptoms, which may ultimately lead to unnecessary surgery. Primary care physicians should consider this and other issues, including increased costs of care, before ordering MRI for patients with knee pain.

    Several studies have shown that MRI may identify signal change that suggests a meniscal tear when the meniscus is not actually torn.1 Other studies have shown that even when a meniscal tear is detected, it may not be related to the presenting symptoms.2,3 Research suggests that a fairly high percentage of arthroscopic procedures may be performed based on abnormal MRI findings instead of clinical findings.4"

    http://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0201/p221.html


    "In this trial involving patients without knee osteoarthritis but with symptoms of a degenerative medial meniscus tear, the outcomes after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy were no better than those after a sham surgical procedure."

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1305189
  3. Mr.HoneyBadger is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    169

    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 8:59pm


     Style: Judo/BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    "Study: In-office MRI leads to more back surgeries"

    http://www.healthimaging.com/topics/...back-surgeries

    "When used for the appropriate indications, MRI is a valuable tool in the evaluation and management of knee pain. However, it may provide clinically irrelevant information by identifying pathology that is not related to a patient's symptoms, which may ultimately lead to unnecessary surgery. Primary care physicians should consider this and other issues, including increased costs of care, before ordering MRI for patients with knee pain.

    Several studies have shown that MRI may identify signal change that suggests a meniscal tear when the meniscus is not actually torn.1 Other studies have shown that even when a meniscal tear is detected, it may not be related to the presenting symptoms.2,3 Research suggests that a fairly high percentage of arthroscopic procedures may be performed based on abnormal MRI findings instead of clinical findings.4"

    http://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0201/p221.html


    "In this trial involving patients without knee osteoarthritis but with symptoms of a degenerative medial meniscus tear, the outcomes after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy were no better than those after a sham surgical procedure."

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1305189
    That's really interesting.
  4. Mr.HoneyBadger is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    169

    Posted On:
    3/10/2014 9:03pm


     Style: Judo/BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by itwasntme View Post
    I would imagine, as with anything, pushing yourself much past your body's "oh ****" feeling you could injure yourself. I have suffered pain in my patellar tendon since I was 18, I'm almost 26 now, and nothing any doctor was telling me to do really helped. I was recently shown these stretches and within a week or two I was pain free.

    Apparently someone else disagrees though.
    I've been trying it out and it feels pretty good. Makes my leg feel light afterwards.

    (down-vote wasn't me)

    Quote Originally Posted by Plasma View Post
    I have heard numerous stories over the years. At this point I don’t know what is true. I would take this all with a grain of salt. But I have heard a few times that in Brazil, Gracie Students where traditionally the upper classes and Luta Livre was for the the lower class. Luta Livre was No-Gi and focused on a lot of leg locks. Gracie students used the Gi and didn’t use Leg Locks. Leg Locks were a “poor man’s technique.”
    O.K. Yes I've heard about the GJJ for the rich v.s. Lutta Livre for the poor. Sounds like something that could have happened.
  5. ChenPengFi is offline
    ChenPengFi's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Hawai'i
    Posts
    3,226

    Posted On:
    3/11/2014 3:27pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hung Gar, Choy Lay Fut

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This about back pain, but the numbers and logic for knees (and shoulders) are similar re: MRIs.
  6. crappler is offline
    crappler's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,747

    Posted On:
    3/14/2014 10:19am


     Style: Judo

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.HoneyBadger View Post
    I've been told that leaning back with your knees bent like he does is really bad for them, because most people aren't flexible enough and end up tearing something in their knees.

    I can touch my back to the floor while doing them so they said I should be fine, as it only injures when you go beyond your flexibility and end up forcing it.
    In fact the position shown right at the start here is actually tweaking the knee at an angle. This person is not stretching the quad correctly at all. Stretching before exercise actually weakens the muscles, so research now indicates stretching should be done afterward. As noted by another poster, if stretching causes pain, you have an injury.
    "We often joke -- and we really wish it were a joke -- that you will only encounter two basic problems with your 'self-defense' training.
    1) That it doesn't work
    2) That it does work"
    -Animal MacYoung
  7. crappler is offline
    crappler's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,747

    Posted On:
    3/14/2014 10:23am


     Style: Judo

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    First slide shows proper stretch of the quadricep.

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-li...g/sls-20076840
    "We often joke -- and we really wish it were a joke -- that you will only encounter two basic problems with your 'self-defense' training.
    1) That it doesn't work
    2) That it does work"
    -Animal MacYoung
  8. crappler is offline
    crappler's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,747

    Posted On:
    3/14/2014 10:30am


     Style: Judo

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/...les_N.htm?csp=

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/0...ype=blogs&_r=0

    The numbers, especially for competitive athletes, are sobering. According to their calculations, static stretching reduces strength in the stretched muscles by almost 5.5 percent, with the impact increasing in people who hold individual stretches for 90 seconds or more. While the effect is reduced somewhat when people’s stretches last less than 45 seconds, stretched muscles are, in general, substantially less strong.
    "We often joke -- and we really wish it were a joke -- that you will only encounter two basic problems with your 'self-defense' training.
    1) That it doesn't work
    2) That it does work"
    -Animal MacYoung
  9. ChenPengFi is offline
    ChenPengFi's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Hawai'i
    Posts
    3,226

    Posted On:
    3/14/2014 11:15am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hung Gar, Choy Lay Fut

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by crappler View Post
    ...As noted by another poster, if stretching causes pain, you have an injury.
    Agreed on the stretching, but that bit isn't strictly true.
  10. goodlun is offline
    goodlun's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Ramona
    Posts
    5,015

    Posted On:
    3/14/2014 3:14pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I love this site
    http://www.exrx.net/Lists/Directory.html

    Detailed information
    http://www.exrx.net/Muscles/Quadriceps.html
    http://www.exrx.net/Articulations/Knee.html#anchor22459

    Best of all exercises and stretches
    http://www.exrx.net/Lists/ExList/Thi...#anchor1942303

    and if you have someone you can do PNF streching with, which has been proven to increase range of motion
    http://www.exrx.net/Stretches/Quadri...roneLying.html

    Read a bit about PNF here
    http://www.exrx.net/ExInfo/Stretching.html
Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst ... 23456 78910 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.