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  1. #31
    ghost55's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Devil View Post
    You're a noob. You're supposed to suck.
    Most certainly. I just want to keep on improving. I just have a hard time being able to tell if I am improving at all.

  2. #32
    goodlun's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The biggest problem with thinking about talent is when something doesn't come easy to us we are willing to throw our hands up and just say well I am not good at that and move on. Its even worse for those of us that a lot of things come easy for. Well I am good at so many other things that this just be something I am not good at.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/02/27/283443...you-feel-small

    Way at the end of this interview Neil Degrasse talks about how hard he prepares to make his interviews look effort less.

  3. #33

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ghost55 View Post
    Most certainly. I just want to keep on improving. I just have a hard time being able to tell if I am improving at all.
    You haven't been doing it long enough. Keep slogging away at it for another six months and you'll start to notice improvement. Something to keep in mind as well, from someone else who isn't particularly talented but is stubborn as hell... When you spend a lot of time working with upper belts (which you should do--that's where you learn the most), as you improve, they ratchet up their game. YOU never feel like you're getting anywhere, but you are. And one day you play someone your rank or lower, and the light bulb goes on, and you realize you really have been improving all this time.

    Something else I have observed is that frequently the folks with a lot of natural talent don't make very good teachers, unless they make a conscious effort to learn. It came so easily to them, that they don't know how to work with someone who isn't getting it. It's not that they don't want to, they just don't know how. OTOH, those of us who struggled for every little gain have a lot more ideas for teaching, because they got used on US.

  4. #34

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    People have varying aptitudes.

    I've got kids, a girl who is now 3, and a boy who is 7. My three year old is more coordinated than her big brother. She is freaky coordinated. At two, she would stand on the arm of a rocking chair, and surf on it as it rocked. She is currently busy jumping off objects in the house that are taller than she is, and is consistently sticking landings.

    My son however, still can't catch a ball at 7, even though I've worked on throwing and catching with him quite a bit. His sister can out-throw him with a baseball. The boy has some foot speed, and is a good climber, but his overall coordination level is much lower than hers, even though the two kids were raised in the same household.

    Now taking that into account, who do you think will be dad's tennis partner in a few years? Yep, the tiny girl is going to be awesome. She has an excellent aptitude for it. Balance, hand-eye coordination, natural explosive power (this seems ridiculous for a three year old, but it's obvious if you watch her.)

    For my son, tennis will probably be very challenging. Not that I won't try to teach him, but it will likely be much tougher for him to pick up. Which is why he's doing BJJ right now. He's got hope as a grappler. No ball to catch/hit/throw and whatnot.

    My feeling is that even if you have a poor aptitude for learning something, with enough effort and time, you can still get pretty good at it. It might take you longer, and you will likely never make it to the world-class level, but you can still become highly proficient if you have enough tenacity. But some people just make it look easy, and if they are driven, they become the elite.
    Last edited by RynoGreene; 3/05/2014 4:06pm at .

  5. #35
    goodlun's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by RynoGreene View Post
    People have varying aptitudes.

    I've got kids, a girl who is now 3, and a boy who is 7. My three year old is more coordinated than her big brother. She is freaky coordinated. At two, she would stand on the arm of a rocking chair, and surf on it as it rocked. She is currently busy jumping off objects in the house that are taller than she is, and is consistently sticking landings.

    My son however, still can't catch a ball at 7, even though I've worked on throwing and catching with him quite a bit. His sister can out-throw him with a baseball. The boy has some foot speed, and is a good climber, but his overall coordination level is much lower than hers, even though the two kids were raised in the same household.

    Now taking that into account, who do you think will be dad's tennis partner in a few years? Yep, the tiny girl is going to be awesome. She has an excellent aptitude for it. Balance, hand-eye coordination, natural explosive power (this seems ridiculous for a three year old, but it's obvious if you watch her.)

    For my son, tennis will probably be very challenging. Not that I won't try to teach him, but it will likely be much tougher for him to pick up. Which is why he's doing BJJ right now. He's got hope as a grappler. No ball to catch/hit/throw and whatnot.

    My feeling is that even if you have a poor aptitude for learning something, with enough effort and time, you can still get pretty good at it. It might take you longer, and you will likely never make it to the world-class level, but you can still become highly proficient if you have enough tenacity. But some people just make it look easy, and if they are driven, they become the elite.
    You may want to have your 7 year olds eyes checked and I mean really checked not just an eye chart checked
    If you have an equivalent to this place http://www.optometrists.org/san_diego/ out where you are it is money well spent.
    You can have better than 20/20 vision and still have eye issues.
    While this is a shot in the dark it is certainly worth the few minutes of poking around to investigate.
    In particular going through this list here
    http://www.optometrists.org/san_diego/vision_quiz.html

  6. #36
    goodlun's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    That last post I just made bring up something big.

    Getting accurate diagnosis and treatment of the issues that do stand in our way.
    Be it Mental or physical.
    The eye dr. is a perfect example. If you read the case studies its amazing the differences.
    If you see the work some Sport Psychologist have done for athletes its amazing.

    A lot of the things our body does is learned and using the right tools you can relearn them.
    Check out all the cool stuff at this site.
    http://www.therapystreetforkids.com/EyeHandCoord.html

    also worth a gander is
    http://primalmove.com/

    Cheng throws up some great range off motion videos by
    Andreo Spina quite often as well.

    So we can improve some of the base stuff that we kind of shrug off. Flexibility, range of motion, reflexes, eye hand coordination, strength, agility, what ever have you, you can improve it. Sure genetics gets in the way some but they are not as binding as we typically let them be.

  7. #37

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yah, no vision issues, but he's got some sensory ones that we are aware of and working on. In general though, he's just not terribly coordinated. It's not just catching, it's throwing too, and he generally is bad at mimicking most gross motor movements.

    Whereas if his sister simply sees someone do something, she can usually do it with no further coaching or instruction. Dance moves, throwing, tumbling, you name it. Needless to say, we signed her up for gymnastics, and my SAMBO coach is already getting itchy to get her in the kids practice. She's fearless too, and will be a total Judo wrecking machine if she wants to be.

  8. #38
    Permalost's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's pretty old school, but I feel that Indian clubs (the kind you swing, not the kind where you get your groove on with Indians) are good for developing coordination, since you can make it more or less complex depending on coordination level. The caveat is that an uncoordinated person is more likely to whack themselves in the head or knee.

  9. #39
    dwkfym's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Devil View Post
    You're a noob. You're supposed to suck.
    I'm not a noob, and I still suck. In any passionate pursuit, I've watched more talented, newer dudes surpass me many times. Perseverance wins every time though.

    The only exception is shooting. I seem to have a knack for it. I have a disproportionate level of skill to practice ratio in that one area.

    Quote Originally Posted by ghost55 View Post
    Most certainly. I just want to keep on improving. I just have a hard time being able to tell if I am improving at all.
    That will be true with most things in life if you are serious about getting good at it.
    Last edited by dwkfym; 3/05/2014 9:13pm at .
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  10. #40
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by dwkfym View Post
    The only exception is shooting. I seem to have a knack for it.


    "Asian eyes work in one plane. If you can see it, you can hit it."


    Papa CPF

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