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  1. didymus is offline

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    Sep 2013
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    Posted On:
    2/24/2014 11:07am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: MMA/boxing/wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Sambo manuals?

    Does anyone know where I can find sambo manuals? Preferably Soviet military ones? I'm interested in what techniques, etc, they taught. I found this one already:

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/75944558/K...bo-Course-1986

    And I was looking through some other manuals, and it seems that its mostly variations of trips, I mean, you have inner and outer trips, and then trips with throws, etc. It seems like the basic principles are easy to pick up on.

    Thanks
  2. mrtnira is online now

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    Jun 2007
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    134

    Posted On:
    5/13/2014 7:37pm


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Your Sambo link may not be "Sambo."

    In looking at the scanned document for content, to include its publication date of 1986, you've got a great example of Soviet combatives during their period of modernization from the late-1970s to the end of the Soviet period (1991), where the influence of karate-style techniques were becoming official in training documents.

    You still have the obvious influence of judo and jiu-jitsu (or jujutsu), in the 1986 document as well. For the Soviets, it was all about effectiveness, and part of judging utility was the ease of instruction and the rate of trainee ability to learn the material.

    I've seen a lot of Sambo material and there is a lot of sports-style, and there is a lot of military combatives material. Your link is very comprehensive. Most of the Soviet Army documents I have are less developed, because they are for a conscript army that would have a two year service period before discharge. The number of movements (techniques) are fewer -- just the basics for the conscript. Special units, even those with conscripts, had more techniques in their training list, but only a few more, and these would be very tailored to unit mission.

    The 1986 scan looks a lot like a para-military police training syllabus because the initial series of moves are to specifically to bring someone into submission, and of course from there they would be taken into custody and transported. The next series of movements are aggressive offensive combat. And there is a set of techniques using the rifle as a weapon, which brings me back to the para-military police (MVD), which served both a military and a police function as an organization, depending. The weapons take aways are standard fare for Soviet-period training manuals.

    The updated version of this document is most likely found in наставление физической подготовке 2009, which is the currently authorized body of Russian physical training and combatives training, having been certified in 2009.

    You can Google the Russian term. It came up for me pretty easily. I also found it at spec-naz.org/library/nfp2009.doc
    The document opens in Word, and will have to be translated. (!) You will see many similar movements to the one 1986 scan you have linked in your post.

    The 2009 document includes a break down of how the inventory of combat technique is divided into four groups. Each group builds on the one before it, so the basic set of techniques are for new recruits, then people who have been in over six months get a few more techniques, people in officer training get a few more techniques on top of that, and those in special units get the full set.

    The 2009 document begins with general fitness and conditioning requirements and programs, and moves toward combatives in the back of the document. Included are things held in reconnaissance soldier and border guard manuals -- such as tying a prisoner up. I didn't see that in the scan of the 1986 training manual.

    I hope this helps you in your search. There is a difference between the sports version and the military version of Sambo, and the techniques have not remained consistent in the military body of training. I wonder if today's official version of police and military hand-to-hand is even called "Sambo"?

    I'm a historian by training, but... I don't know everything. Perhaps others with better knowledge can help you further down the road of discovery. I hope you enjoy the link to the 2009 document, and that it downloads easily for you.
  3. mrtnira is online now

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    Posted On:
    5/13/2014 9:18pm


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Didymus, your link to the 1986 document is actually very interesting. It is a KGB and MVD training manual.
  4. mrtnira is online now

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    Posted On:
    6/14/2014 11:58am


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here is the translation of the face page, which contains the government offices authorizing the document, the authors, the title of the document, what the document is for (intention), and the publication place and date. The translator was a person, not Google, so the capitalization reflects his formal training and knowledge of the Soviet model of writing. It the West, we might have capitalized the committee name, for example, and not just a part of it. What follows is a verbatim from his translation:

    Central Council of "Dinamo"

    Organizational systemic committee for physical preparation of colleagues of the KGB, MVD for the presidium of the Central council of "Dinamo"

    A.V. Prudov, V.I. Samoylov, S.N. Sobolev

    The Art of Carrying Out the Techniques of Hand Combat

    Systematical development for the instructors' staff for physical preparation

    Moscow 1986

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