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  1. CrimsonTiger is offline
    CrimsonTiger's Avatar

    RAAAAAAR! Fear the Tiger!

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    Posted On:
    5/06/2004 9:42pm

    supporting member
     Style: Karate/Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    OMAR! Hush!

    No no it's ok guys...pivot for ALL your roundhouses...that's just fine...*grin* And don't mind when someone is beating on the back of your skull every time you throw a thigh kick.

    Most low kicks are non-pivot or minimal pivot. Like Omar said, you step into it more than anything (switch-step for the lead leg) and your hip and body weight do the damage. There's no "one way" to apply all kicks. If it was that simple, we'd all be gods by now.
    Regards,
    CrimsonTiger

    "Na'h, they should go to old school rules.
    One guy gets sword and sheild, the other gets a net and a trident.
    Lions eat christians between rounds." - Strong Machine
  2. Omar is offline

    Baji demigod.

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    Posted On:
    5/07/2004 1:20am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Chinese Kung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    er....uh... I mean...YEAH! The problem is probably your not chambering you kicks tight enough...and ..ah...WHIPPING them out there. Like a WHIP yeah.
    Fighting evil and upholding justice in blue silk pajamas baby!
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=UGaYD_wcaIg

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=6Uepo9ahg-M

    Bah!!! Puny Humans.


  3. Jolly_Roger is offline

    Lord Of the Rhymes

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    Dec 2003
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    Buenos Aires, Argentina
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    Posted On:
    5/07/2004 2:04am


     Style: Pimpin/Tango-thanks Xango

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My instructor always says: "Aim at the rear leg, and hit it with all you've got". That way, when you hit the front leg, it really goes full force
    Canuckyokushin:

    These women can do back flips right over my head and still land on there feet .GRrrrrrrr!

    feedback:

    THAT'S NOTHING, I USED TO KNOW SOME 12 YEAR-OLDS WHO COULD FIT INSIDE A SUITCASE AND STAY ALIVE FOR 7 OR WAS IT 6 HOURS
  4. meowrsx is offline
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    Registered Member

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    New York
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    575

    Posted On:
    5/07/2004 6:53am


     Style: JKDC

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    thanks alot guys. going to class saturday, and i'll keep all those things in mind.
  5. Ronin is offline

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    5/07/2004 7:12am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Shi Ja Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Relax the leg muscles, tense muscles will slow down the technique and kicks are slow enough as it is.
    The supporting leg is key, the knee should be SLIGHTLY bent for low kicks, and you should NOT pivot as much as when you high kick, but you should still pivot some to allow your hip to "lead your kick".
    The low kick must be very explosive for many reason, one of them is the fact that you are closer to your opponent when you low kick than when you high kick, thus he has a clear shot at you while you are kicking.
    The sabaki site has some nice slips of low kicks.
    Aim for just above the knee and not to high up on the thigh, it might just bounce off on a guy with big, stong thighs.
    Keep your upper body relaxed also and, like a spring, coil and explode !!
  6. much love is offline

    MMA Fighter/Instructor

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    Jan 2004
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    684

    Posted On:
    5/07/2004 9:15am


     Style: Jazzercise

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Pivot not withstanding

    Omar is right regarding the marriage of gravity

    make it one beautiful arc up and then down

    also, I don't think anyone has mentioned hip flexion vs. jackknifing

    your body should be wide open with your spine hyperextended (or almost) and hips pushed out (flexion)

    if your spine is in flexion at all you are jackknifed and your power is not maxed
  7. CrimsonTiger is offline
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    RAAAAAAR! Fear the Tiger!

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    Posted On:
    5/07/2004 3:48pm

    supporting member
     Style: Karate/Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'd argue that, much love. Look at K-1 clips and you'll often see Hoost or other big hitters with their bodies jack-knifed. There are times the trade-off between being open (hyperextended spine and pushed-out hips leaves you WAY open) vs. good power needs to be balanced. To do what you're describing, you'd HAVE to pivot fully.

    Personally, I prefer to add "dropping weight" into my kick...just before contact on the thigh my supporting knee bends a bit more and the hips come over (rear leg RH). The drop in weight adds another force angle into the impact (rotational and vertical) on their thigh and really messes with their balance.

    I do have a question...my lead-leg roundhouse tends to jar the knee a lot. I usually throw it off the switch-step (right leg switches back, then launches the RH kick). I tend to find that as I turn my hips over, the lower-leg tends to "lag" behind and jar the knee as the shin impacts on the target. Anyone else have this problem? I've been told the lead roundhouse really is only intended for pivotless-type kicks anyways, not the big power-rounds. Any thoughts?
    Regards,
    CrimsonTiger

    "Na'h, they should go to old school rules.
    One guy gets sword and sheild, the other gets a net and a trident.
    Lions eat christians between rounds." - Strong Machine
  8. Omar is offline

    Baji demigod.

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    Posted On:
    5/07/2004 5:42pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Chinese Kung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm sure I understand. You mean your standing leg knee gets jarred? Weird.

    on a side note, my teacher actually taught us to mostly avoid the switch step. We learned it and it was good in combos but for an opening lead round he though it telegraphed to much and taught me to use a simple step forward and to the right to set up the lead round.
    Fighting evil and upholding justice in blue silk pajamas baby!
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=UGaYD_wcaIg

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=6Uepo9ahg-M

    Bah!!! Puny Humans.


  9. Shuma-Gorath is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/08/2004 11:40pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ - Homeland Security

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Originally posted by CrimsonTiger
    I'd argue that, much love. Look at K-1 clips and you'll often see Hoost or other big hitters with their bodies jack-knifed. There are times the trade-off between being open (hyperextended spine and pushed-out hips leaves you WAY open) vs. good power needs to be balanced. To do what you're describing, you'd HAVE to pivot fully.
    Hoost is a great example. He gets away with that huge arc on the low kick because he always throws a huge flurry up high, then when they guy raises his dukes he tees off on the thigh.
  10. Punisher is offline
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    Seeker of Truth

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    Posted On:
    5/08/2004 11:57pm

    supporting member
     Style: Five Animal Fighting

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was just watching K-1 today and I saw fighters like Remy Bonjasky and Michael McDonald rotating plenty when throwing low kicks. Maybe not as much as when kicking higher, but it was there.

    Just an observation.
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