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  1. #1
    meowrsx's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Improving MT Round Kick

    Yesterday, I was practicing my MT low round kick (the type aimed for the shins) on a partner holding a MT kick pad. I was giving it a full swing, but I don't think I'm generating much power. My question is, for those of you who practice MT, or anything where there are powerful leg strikes, were your kicks somewhat weak in the beginning?

    I know that it will OBVIOUSLY get stronger over time, but how big of a change do you think there was since you first hit the pad? I'll tell you now, I'm younger than alot of the people on bullshido, and I'm pretty small for my age. Will my kicks gain power as I practice them more? Or is there perhaps some sort of common problem I'm making as a beginner?

    If it helps, just recently I ended my first month of MT.

  2. #2
    Punisher's Avatar
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    Did your partner give you nay feedback? Did they tell you your kick was weak or let you know of any flaws in your technique?

    I wouldn't be worried too much. Yes, I thnk your kicks and other strikes will gain power as you do them more. Some of this will come from physical training but most of it will come from technique. You are likely making a lot of common mistakes, and your instructor and your partners should be able to help you sort them out.

    I was never very big growning up, under 130 lbs until I graduated college. Once I learned how to hit, I still hit pretty damn hard. I got up to around 190 and honestly I still didn't; hit that much harder.

  3. #3

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    The short answer is that power will improve with technique and practice.

    There is a tendency to kick with leg power when you start. As your technique improves and you get more hip and whipping motion, the power will improve (perhaps significantly).

  4. #4

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    Originally posted by punchingdummy
    The short answer is that power will improve with technique and practice.

    tru dat!

  5. #5

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    Hello meowrsx, try doing that kick while standing in a swimming pool. The water will provide a lot of resistance, and in fact the harder you push, the more the water resists.

    This works best with front-leg kicks; rear leg kicks rely too much on momentum...

  6. #6

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    My kicks were about average when I first started out. I could generate some power, but I didn't know how to get my hips into the kick at first. My trainer had me focus on pivoting on the ball of my foot while raising my knee high. I guess this is more for a body or head kick, but it's added a lot more power to my kicks because I can whip my leg around now.

    Just keep at it, eventually something will click.

  7. #7

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    quit your whining and pump some iron, girlie man!

  8. #8

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    Almost everyone low kicks like a ***** if they haven't specifically worked at it.

    Pivoting gets in the way for the low kicks. It works higher up but not down low. You ned to step through more. For a right leg kick, step off to the left. It's just like walking. Nice and easy and let the leg swing out loose from the hip. Add power in tiny tiny increments. Don't rush it. Even with in a single session it pays to just just the pad nice and loose a few times and only GRADUALLY build up the power being carelfull to preserve the looseness you have on the lighter kicks.

    It helps if you can let your leg describe a gentle arc up and then down. The main problem with low kicks is that most people have never learned to kick downwards. Most people kick up at an angle and can't dinf the power in the opposite direction.
    Fighting evil and upholding justice in blue silk pajamas baby!
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  9. #9
    bunyip's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Omar
    Pivoting gets in the way for the low kicks. It works higher up but not down low.
    ??!!

    Please clarify.
    "I'm offering straight punch, kick while downed to the ribs or head, and of course- the german suplex...which is one suplex quickly followed by another." - Guerilla Fists

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  10. #10
    chaosexmachina's Avatar
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    Yeah. I've been taught to pivot for all roundhoses, even the low ones.
    "Prison is for rapists, thieves and murderers. If you lock someone up for smoking a plant that makes them happy, you're the fucking criminal." - Joe Rogan

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