1. #1
    HAPKO3's Avatar
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    Help with a rehab program

    As some of you know, I've recently undergone major shoulder surgery. I am still in the PT/recovery phase, and will not be able to strength train for a couple of months. I think this is a good time to start doing some research on a possible program to follow once I am allowed to do so. Anyone with PT experience is welcome to chime in.

    Here's the situation. Prior to the injury, I was on a basic weight gaining program, concentrating mainly on the "big three" plus assorted things like lat pull downs, millitary press, etc. for diversity. After my injury last July, though, I had to cease all training. On top of that, I've spent almost 2 months with my right arm and shoulder immobilized.

    As a resuly, the muscles on my right side have atrophated quite a bit. Even visually, my right arm is almost 1.5 times thinner than my left. I do not yet know how much strength I've lost since I am not allowed to put any real stress on the joint.

    According to my doctor, I will be allowed to do some strengthening in roughly 2 months, given the following restrictions:

    1) I should never max out on weight, as long as the shoulder is envolved in the excersize. I am allowed to raize the weight VERY slowly up to my max over something like two more months.

    2) I am not allowed to do any type ove overhand lifts, nor should I do millitary press for a while, bench press is ok.

    3) My right side is expected to be SIGNIFICANTLY weaker than my left side, which would make a lot of these excersizes awkward to perform.

    That's about it, folks. Ideas?
    You say what about my rice?

  2. #2

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    Not qualified for any serious advice, but, one exercise I came across may help: Single arm dumbbell bench pressing. Awkward at first but useful.

  3. #3
    HAPKO3's Avatar
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    Yeah, that's a good idea since a regular bench press would probably be way too awkward with so much of a strength disparity.
    You say what about my rice?

  4. #4
    Phrost's Avatar
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    Totally dumbells. Plus, I'd work anything not involving the shoulder like I was crazy. Can you do squats?

  5. #5

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    Before you START any serious weight lifting program, finish rehab and the physio.
    Machines allow you to work BOTH sides without putting undo stress on one over the other.
    Dumbells may will be the answer to begin with, but I would be careful NOT to increase the difference in strength already there.
    Slow, light weights, anatomically correct exercises ( no upright rows for example), go very easy on movements that are NOT done in the "real world" with weights ( lat. raises).

    That being said, lower body exercise such as squats and leg press stimulte growth and strength ALL OVER, so maybe to concentrate on them for a bit...

  6. #6

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    Lots of machines don't allow the arms to work independently though. When they do you can't use different weights (which would probably be a bad idea anyway but may be a desired option).

  7. #7

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    I was refering to re-hab machines, should have made that clear.
    I have heard mixed opinions on using different weights one each hand, some say that it can cause spinal problems, others that it will make the difference in strength worst.

  8. #8

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    Personally I think it is a bad idea in general. With that big of a difference though it seems a neccessary starting point. Regardless I'm sure he's talking to people better informed than I.

  9. #9

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    the 7 minute rotator cuff solution

    is a great book for shoulder rehab

    and I also like to work through shoulder injuries with dumbells

    warning on squats - abnormal shoulder movement results from wrapping thumbs, monkey paw brother, monkey paw

  10. #10

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    I highly recommend working with the pros on this. Make friends with your physical therapist and rehab staff. Tell them you want to be able to do "X" not just become standard-issue-functional again. They can give you suggestions for a program after the PT sessions are over. Follow the advice and you'll find yourself training once again. You'd be surprised how many of them like to help people who will help themselves.

    Your profile shows you are in San Diego. Maybe you can hook-up with an an atheletic trainier or grad student in exercise phys at SDSU.

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