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  1. bobyclumsyninja is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/11/2014 9:39pm

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     Style: Ex-Tiger KF, ex-SanDa

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by wetware View Post
    Eh, I don't buy this at all. I've been taught to check opposite side kicks in precisely this manner, especially when retreating. Which Weidman was at the time.

    Edit: Not to say Silva didn't make a mistake, the kick was not well thrown. But taking away credit due for a well-executed kick check to chalk it up to "Silva Screwed Up" is disingenuous.
    It wasn't my intention to do that. I was immensely impressed with Weidman's form throughout.

    Simply put: If someone's dropping their hand after a right straight and their opponent counters over the top and KO's them, it's both a mistake, and a nice counter technique.

    Similarly, Silva - in spite of his prowess and experience - threw a sloppy kick, that ran into ideal low kick defense (there was a check there, I'm seeing). It was both an error, and a nice counter. I've made the same error, but didn't break anything because I don't have the power (lol)

    I'm no expert (I'm not even proficient), but that was my observation. If Silva had thrown with the hip turned over, he'd have likely landed the kick, or at the very least, wouldn't have broken his shinbone. That doesn't detract from Weidman's accomplishments. He earned both victories completely.
  2. KiwiPhil889 is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/12/2014 12:04am


     Style: Kickboxin & Shootfightin

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm curious how much of a "perfect storm" type event this was. Something that has gotten me wondering is weather Andersons kick being a rear leg kick gave Weidman more time to react/get his check in place??

    Most of the time that the inside leg kick gets thrown in gyms is off the front foot because both fighters are orthodox, therefore quicker kick and less time to get a check set. Would throwing it off the front leg, typical righty vs righty situation make the check that much less likely to land?? and the leg break much less likely to occur?
  3. wetware is online now

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    Posted On:
    1/12/2014 1:18am


     Style: BJJ/MT

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by KiwiPhil889 View Post
    I'm curious how much of a "perfect storm" type event this was. Something that has gotten me wondering is weather Andersons kick being a rear leg kick gave Weidman more time to react/get his check in place??

    Most of the time that the inside leg kick gets thrown in gyms is off the front foot because both fighters are orthodox, therefore quicker kick and less time to get a check set. Would throwing it off the front leg, typical righty vs righty situation make the check that much less likely to land?? and the leg break much less likely to occur?
    I think what's more important here is that Silva is a strong striker who fights southpaw. If you're a right hander who fights orthodox the only time you'd really be able to use that kind of check is against an inside leg kick with the front leg, which probably wouldn't have enough force to do that kind of damage or a switch kick. I can't think of the last time I saw a switch kick in MMA. (Someone will probably find one five minutes after I post this. Whatever. They're not real common.) Against a southpaw this check can be used against their bread and butter rear leg kicks, which obviously do have the power to do this kind of damage. It's also important to note that southpaws can use this kind of check much more frequently that orthodox fighters simply because the vast majority of their opponents will have the opposite stance.

    Edit: How did I miss the last half of your post? Yes, you're right.
    Last edited by wetware; 1/12/2014 1:26am at .
  4. erezb is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/12/2014 8:42am


     Style: Boxing,Kickboxing K1

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by wetware View Post
    I think what's more important here is that Silva is a strong striker who fights southpaw. If you're a right hander who fights orthodox the only time you'd really be able to use that kind of check is against an inside leg kick with the front leg, which probably wouldn't have enough force to do that kind of damage or a switch kick. I can't think of the last time I saw a switch kick in MMA. (Someone will probably find one five minutes after I post this. Whatever. They're not real common.) Against a southpaw this check can be used against their bread and butter rear leg kicks, which obviously do have the power to do this kind of damage. It's also important to note that southpaws can use this kind of check much more frequently that orthodox fighters simply because the vast majority of their opponents will have the opposite stance.

    Edit: How did I miss the last half of your post? Yes, you're right.
    That is a dangerous check, he easily could have faked a very low kick and actually kick to the mid section, this check is quick but renders you upper thigh and body exposed. I also think this injury is not because of his technique, he kicked like that for thousands of times without shin guards, he knows (knew) what he can take when his opponent checks it. There is a reason people use shin guards, shins can break though rarely in such horrid fashion.
    I think he had strain breaks (pressure breaks) because of actually kicking too much as a preparation for this fight..this resulted in this freak accident.
    But from my limited experience without shinguard, if someone is quick to check them, low round houses are fucking painful. Only hard core MT guys can pull this **** off..its ridiculously painful.
  5. bobyclumsyninja is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/12/2014 9:51pm

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     Style: Ex-Tiger KF, ex-SanDa

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by erezb View Post
    That is a dangerous check, he easily could have faked a very low kick and actually kick to the mid section, this check is quick but renders you upper thigh and body exposed.
    What's wrong with the check? Fill in the graphic I've prepared just for you.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ez101.jpg 
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  6. Omega Supreme is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/12/2014 10:43pm

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     Style: Chinese Boxing

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by erezb View Post
    That is a dangerous check, he easily could have faked a very low kick and actually kick to the mid section, this check is quick but renders you upper thigh and body exposed. I also think this injury is not because of his technique, he kicked like that for thousands of times without shin guards, he knows (knew) what he can take when his opponent checks it. There is a reason people use shin guards, shins can break though rarely in such horrid fashion.
    I think he had strain breaks (pressure breaks) because of actually kicking too much as a preparation for this fight..this resulted in this freak accident.
    But from my limited experience without shinguard, if someone is quick to check them, low round houses are fucking painful. Only hard core MT guys can pull this **** off..its ridiculously painful.
    No dude, no.
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