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  1. DMC is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    14

    Posted On:
    9/25/2013 11:50am


     Style: uechi ryu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by CapnMunchh View Post
    I understand the concept of pushing the attacker away as opposed to just poking, but its a headlock and you're bent over. Are you saying that you stand straight up as you push the pressure point because the point pressure makes it possible (distracts, etc.)? I've also seen something similar done with reaching for the ear point with one hand and lifting his near leg with the other to take him down.
    Okay, this is probably hijacking my own thread, but what the hell:
    First, it is important that we understand each other on the term 'standing straight'.
    If you allow the opponent to bend you over in the headlock so that your back is bent etc, it is practically impossible to counter. In order to counter effectively, you have to get your hips underneath you and your spine straight. It is like when squatting with a barbell - hunched back, straight legs = no power. Instead, your knees must be bent, your back is straight, your hips underneath you, the head is looking up. Only after you get your base back like that you can effectively counter the headlock - be it with a takedown or a pressure against some part of opponents body.

    There are a lot of headlock defenses out there. I think a lot depends on body position, whether there's movement, relative strength, pain tolerance, etc. What I've learned is that there are 2 potential bad scenarios: (1) you get punched in the face repeatedly -- so its a good idea to reach around his back and hold on to the arm that's not around your neck, and (2) he goes to the ground into a side mount type position with your head under his arm, which could break your neck. So, I figure that, assuming its not just a friend screwing around, after grabbing his free arm I fall back or roll forward, both of which put him on his back. if he's still holding on, I throw my leg over him to get in a mounted position. There are then a couple of things that can get him to let go.
    Yes, side headlock done properly is a necklock (when he goes with you to the ground). Tony Cecchine shows this perfectly in his series 'Snap no tap'. But I do not think that many people know how to do this.

    As for the punches, the above mentioned man refers to punches in side headlock as 'love taps'; meaning, you cannot really throw with power from that positions.

    Nevertheless, to counter a headlock, primary objective is always to establish the base as described above. And then, counter before he goes to the ground with you. Without the base and without being faster, no technique works.
  2. -TANK- is offline

    Lightweight

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    147

    Posted On:
    9/26/2013 12:49pm

    supporting member
     Style: Judo, Wrestling, TKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    DMC,
    My brother six years older than me did this once maybe twice. After that, I never let him near me, and my dad caught in one time in the backyard doing that to me. Told me and him nuts and head shots, INCLUDING the neck were off limits.

    To me it works on unsuspecting victims, much like others have said. Our dad taught us some pressure point stuff, but like others said, it is last ditch. Primary target has always been the groin and then submit, sticking fingers in the throat is nothing I would go to even in training , would much rather work on my feet so my brother COULDN'T do that ****.

    That being said, there are people here in Albuquerque who swear by this type of martial art and have done some stuff on me, it is legit, thus the footwork comment. (don't let them near you till you are ready if possible)
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