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  1. Rivington is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/15/2013 12:29pm

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     Style: Taijiquan/Shuai-Chiao/BJJ

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Hardon View Post

    I admire Chen Style and have played at it and it has its place; which is not in a ring with an MT fighter.
    Certainly not under K1 rules, which disallows 65-75 percent of Chen taiji's moves and strategies.
  2. alex is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/15/2013 2:38pm

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     Style: Muay Thai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    to be fair, k-1 rules disallows a massive amount of muay thai technique. ever since buakaw wrecked every top japanese fighter they started coming down on whatever he was using to do it, until he became a good enough boxer that they realised they cant ban people punching.
  3. Tranquil Suit is online now
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    Posted On:
    9/15/2013 3:01pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by alex View Post
    to be fair, k-1 rules disallows a massive amount of muay thai technique. ever since buakaw wrecked every top japanese fighter they started coming down on whatever he was using to do it, until he became a good enough boxer that they realised they cant ban people punching.
    Similiar goes for Semmy Schilt.



    Those fucking Japs...

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  4. Jack Rusher is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/15/2013 3:59pm


     Style: ti da shuai na

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Rivington View Post
    under K1 rules, which disallows 65-75 percent of Chen taiji's moves and strategies.
    This is my problem with it: If they they train for K-1 rules they'll not be training to show what's good or interesting in Chen taiji. (To almost the same extent that training a team of Greco-Roman wrestlers for a K-1 fight would show almost nothing about Greco).

    I'd prefer see san da rules because it's more inclusive of taiji technique, but the downside is that the short clinch clock, throw-centric scoring structure, &c, would be unfair to the Thai boxers. Ultimately, I'd rather they just learn submission grappling and compete under MMA rules.

    (BTW, for what it's worth, I don't expect it to be a blowout loss for the Chen guys. They have kickboxing experience, and they'll have trained specifically for this event.)
    “Most people do not do, but take refuge in theory and talk, thinking that they will become good in this way” -- Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, II.4
  5. MaartenSFS is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/18/2013 1:08am


     Style: Sanda, Taijiquan ( Chen)

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've been training six days a week, often five hours a day, in Chen Taijiquan with hopes of teaching in the West some day and when I saw the title was absolutely stoked - until I read K1.

    I just do not get it... I wish that it would have been Taiji versus Sanda. This will do nothing to help Taiji's reputation because, even if they win, it probably won't be Taiji. Taiji has its fair share of strikes, but it is a close quarters art. Sensitivity is trained at the point when two bodies touch with the usual result of someone getting thrown or having something broken. Does K1 allow elbows and shoulder strikes, knees? Unless these are allowed I can't even bare to watch. =S
  6. Magpie McGee is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/18/2013 3:38am


     Style: Thai Boxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by MaartenSFS View Post
    I've been training six days a week, often five hours a day, in Chen Taijiquan with hopes of teaching in the West some day and when I saw the title was absolutely stoked - until I read K1.
    No one gives a ****.

    Quote Originally Posted by MaartenSFS View Post
    I just do not get it... I wish that it would have been Taiji versus Sanda. This will do nothing to help Taiji's reputation because, even if they win, it probably won't be Taiji. Taiji has its fair share of strikes, but it is a close quarters art. Sensitivity is trained at the point when two bodies touch with the usual result of someone getting thrown or having something broken. Does K1 allow elbows and shoulder strikes, knees? Unless these are allowed I can't even bare to watch. =S
    So do you think full Thai rules would be more balanced?
  7. MaartenSFS is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/18/2013 4:23pm


     Style: Sanda, Taijiquan ( Chen)

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Magpie McGee View Post
    So do you think full Thai rules would be more balanced?
    If they trained for it, perhaps.. As far as I know there is some grappling allowed in the clinch in MT? Are "trips", as in putting your foot behind theirs and ramming into them, allowed? A lot of Taiji throws aren't huge and Judo-like, but subtle and quick, trying to unbalance them. I think that it could possibly work and I have faith in Chen Ziqiang.
  8. alex is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/18/2013 4:27pm

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     Style: Muay Thai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by MaartenSFS View Post
    If they trained for it, perhaps.. As far as I know there is some grappling allowed in the clinch in MT? Are "trips", as in putting your foot behind theirs and ramming into them, allowed? A lot of Taiji throws aren't huge and Judo-like, but subtle and quick, trying to unbalance them. I think that it could possibly work and I have faith in Chen Ziqiang.
  9. Permalost is online now
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    Posted On:
    9/18/2013 4:51pm

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     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by MaartenSFS View Post
    A lot of Taiji throws aren't huge and Judo-like, but subtle and quick, trying to unbalance them. I think that it could possibly work and I have faith in Chen Ziqiang.
    I'd say tai chi throws are often less subtle than their judo equivalents, because of their preference for throwing from a low rooted stance.
  10. MaartenSFS is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/19/2013 10:27pm


     Style: Sanda, Taijiquan ( Chen)

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    I'd say tai chi throws are often less subtle than their judo equivalents, because of their preference for throwing from a low rooted stance.
    I can't really explain my point, but I feel like Taiji throws are often more long-distance (from the opponent) and not meant to throw them over your head, but unbalance them. Either way, K1 rules suck for both Taiji and Judo.
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