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  1. #11
    battlefields's Avatar
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    BJJ/ MMA/ MT
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PDA View Post
    Where does Eddie Bravo fit into all this?
    He revolutionised everything by giving everything hip nicknames.
    GET A RED BELT OR DIE TRYIN'.

  2. #12
    PointyShinyBurn's Avatar
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    London, UK
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PDA View Post
    Where does Eddie Bravo fit into all this?
    Well, according to people who have shitty flexibility he was the first BJJ player ever to smoke weed.

  3. #13
    crappler's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PDA View Post
    Where does Eddie Bravo fit into all this?
    He was their supplier...
    "We often joke -- and we really wish it were a joke -- that you will only encounter two basic problems with your 'self-defense' training.
    1) That it doesn't work
    2) That it does work"
    -Animal MacYoung

  4. #14
    danharr's Avatar
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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    At Gracie gyms we bow to master Carlos,who was Maeda's first student and taught Jiujitsu to Helio, so yeah I'd like to know where Helio being the founder came from as well. The only guess I could make is the truth has been confused by late 20th century events. Maybe his co-founding of the UFC and his sons being so dominate in UFC and Pride using this thing called BJJ. Gave rise to a misconception that he had started it all.

  5. #15
    jnp's Avatar
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    6
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Truth is, Helio had a better publicist in the U.S. than Carlos did. His name was Rorion Gracie.

    Bear in mind that the following opinion was formed from secondhand information that is 5 to 6 decades old, but I get the impression from multiple articles that Helio was always considerably more outspoken than Carlos was concerning the validity and efficacy of GJJ. Add to this that Helio was never shy about mentioning how important he was to the sport and you can begin to understand the how and why.

  6. #16

    Join Date
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    Judo noob, injured guy.
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by 02-6611-0142-1 View Post
    Not trolling, legit question. I'm not hating on Helio so much as asking what his contribution to the art was.

    Here's a quick thing that's probably a gross oversimplification:

    Attachment 15270

    Okay, so in the top row we know that Fukuda was big on applying technique in randori, Iso was big on kata, and Iikibuo was big on technical throws.

    Kano we know about.

    Vasili we know incorporated a host of Eastern European wrestling styles, and Maeda integrated catch wrestling as well as the "see if it works by fighting people" approach.

    Luis Franca we know was into leglocks (so i guess Maeda must have known some, so I guess early judo must have included some), and Euclydes was a separate integration of Judo and Catch from Maeda's.

    On the bottom row we know that Rolls was big on travelling and learning new things from outside the family art, and we know that Carlson was big on having an aggressive top game. Helio was supposedly more technical while Carlson was more physical. But what does that mean, exactly? Did he invent the guard? I honestly don't know.

    Gracie, Franca and Euclydes students cross pollinated so much that it's hard to see them as separate after that point.

    I just see Helio's name thrown around so much as the "founder" of what's a long and complicated chain of people, that it got me interested in trying to work out what he actually invented.
    That graphic is magically delicious. Judo did/does have some leg locks. In fact they are still present in some of the kata, they just aren't legal in competition just like some of the throws that risk knee injury more than average. So next to no one bothers to train them. Besides that, if Maeda was running the catch wrestling circuit he probably would have run into plenty of them.

  7. #17

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Better marketing.

    But the grandkids got legit skillz.

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