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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    17
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Magpie McGee View Post
    From the title, the advice I expected to give was "use more lube," but in this case, unless you think he might hurt someone, let him do it. He'll either learn better or gas out too quickly to be a problem for long.

    But I'm full of ****. Really, I just wanted to make the lube joke.
    Lubrication: the solution to all problems.

    I personally prefer WD-40 when things don't move when they should.
    Last edited by Ira Poon; 7/24/2013 12:30am at .

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Cuddleton
    Posts
    410
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ira Poon View Post
    Lubrication: the solution to all problems.

    I personally prefer WD-40 when things don't move when they should.
    Sorry, the lube joke was already made.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    17
    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Darn, late again.

    I blame time travel.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Lower Franconia
    Posts
    1,076
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cuddles View Post
    Sorry, the lube joke was already made.
    Can I still do the safeword one?

  5. #15
    crappler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,747
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have a simple solution. I use all of the pent-up anger I have developed over years of suppressing a deep inner rage because my mommy was mean to me and I kick there ass. Repeatedly. If I can.
    "We often joke -- and we really wish it were a joke -- that you will only encounter two basic problems with your 'self-defense' training.
    1) That it doesn't work
    2) That it does work"
    -Animal MacYoung

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    810
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I find the key to dealing with opponents who go harder than agreed upon is proper verbal communication. Some guys are not doing it on purpose, but are just naturally competitive and will not even realize they are doing so. This happens particularly in striking and in MMA. If my training partner is going too hard and it's a level that is not helping me improve in what I want I just tell them and ask them to lower it down a bit. If I have to ask multiple times through out a roll so be it.

    If you train in a fight gym the MMA fighters will go harder even in drilling and rolling simply because they do so much hard sparring for their camps. One guy i work with semi regularly is a former Bellator fighter and he cannot go light. To him light is just a busted lip and a bruised face instead of knocking your teeth out and not knocking you out. There will always be people like this in every competition training environment. Knowing who is "safe" to roll with and who not is very important in training.

    Most of the time I don't work with this guy when I want to get better at something or drill. But, if I want to test something or practice being calm in a dangerous spot and escape or nullify damage from a position, he's a good person to work with.

    Of course, barring all this ultimately the problem lies in the opponent's mental aggression. You really have to reduce this in some manner be it verbally or physically. I find the most appropriate tool to do this is the chain punch.

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