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  1. AKRhino is online now
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    Posted On:
    7/17/2013 5:51pm


     Style: Brazillian Jiu Jitsu

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm extremely uncompetitive. I do comps for 2 reasons, the first is that my wife is very competitive, so I show up to support her. The second, is to learn. My most recent experience was a Judo comp where I got completely dominated and ipponed very quickly. I learned a TON from those 2 minutes of combined action though, so it was well worth it. Winning is fun, but it's hardly my motivation. Anyway, just offering a different, less competitively minded view of competition.

    As for your comments about your record of subs... As a BJJ guy, I get nothing out of **** housing noobs. The point of rolling, imho, is that you, and your partner, are learning. If you're finding it extremely easy to sub the guy, then play catch and release, or skip the easy stuff. Don't grab the kimura, spin all the around for the arm bar, or whatever else.

    Having trained for a while, I've dealt with many similar partners. It can be frustrating when your partner is not taking the training as seriously as you are. Has anyone brought it to his attention that his attitude is preventing his partners from getting good training? I have seen improvements when people just didn't realize that they're lackadaisical attitude was preventing his partner from training correctly. It's one thing to goof off at the expense of your own training experience, it's another to do it at someone else's expense.
  2. Hadzu is online now

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    Posted On:
    7/17/2013 6:47pm


     Style: Shoo Sheetzoo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by AKRhino View Post
    I'm extremely uncompetitive. I do comps for 2 reasons, the first is that my wife is very competitive, so I show up to support her. The second, is to learn. My most recent experience was a Judo comp where I got completely dominated and ipponed very quickly. I learned a TON from those 2 minutes of combined action though, so it was well worth it. Winning is fun, but it's hardly my motivation. Anyway, just offering a different, less competitively minded view of competition.

    As for your comments about your record of subs... As a BJJ guy, I get nothing out of **** housing noobs. The point of rolling, imho, is that you, and your partner, are learning. If you're finding it extremely easy to sub the guy, then play catch and release, or skip the easy stuff. Don't grab the kimura, spin all the around for the arm bar, or whatever else.

    Having trained for a while, I've dealt with many similar partners. It can be frustrating when your partner is not taking the training as seriously as you are. Has anyone brought it to his attention that his attitude is preventing his partners from getting good training? I have seen improvements when people just didn't realize that they're lackadaisical attitude was preventing his partner from training correctly. It's one thing to goof off at the expense of your own training experience, it's another to do it at someone else's expense.

    I suppose my big problem is that I'm usually very non-confrontational; unless someone is being really, really douchy I tend to let it slide. I have a lot of social anxieties, so in these types of situations I have trouble taking action, because I'm worried I'll be acting out of line because I misread the situation. I agree that my "record" really is meaningless, and is strictly my (failed) attempt at humoring myself. As stated, regular training won't resume until at least a month from now, so it'll be a while before any of these tips and suggestions make it into practice; still grateful for 'em, though.

    /Erik
  3. AKRhino is online now
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    Posted On:
    7/17/2013 7:02pm


     Style: Brazillian Jiu Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh yeah, I forgot I was gonna mention rank requirements. My club is under USJA, so we follow their guidelines. Basically, as I understand it, you get points for various things, including attendance, competitions (points vary by rank of your opponent), attending seminars, even bringing in friends, unless I'm mistaken. Once you've satisfied the point requirement to test for the next rank (as well as any time requirements there are), then you can test. The test follows whatever the USJA guidelines for a given belt test are. My yellow belt test for example, I had to do 2 throws, then another throw in a self defense situation, then I had to do some positional escapes on the ground. Lastly I had to know some Japanese terms.

    So, competition is not required, but you DO earn points for it, meaning if you wanted to fast track your way up through the ranks, competitions would be a great way to earn the extra points. Otherwise, it just might take a bit longer.
  4. Hadzu is online now

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    Posted On:
    7/17/2013 8:45pm


     Style: Shoo Sheetzoo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by AKRhino View Post
    Oh yeah, I forgot I was gonna mention rank requirements. My club is under USJA, so we follow their guidelines. Basically, as I understand it, you get points for various things, including attendance, competitions (points vary by rank of your opponent), attending seminars, even bringing in friends, unless I'm mistaken. Once you've satisfied the point requirement to test for the next rank (as well as any time requirements there are), then you can test. The test follows whatever the USJA guidelines for a given belt test are. My yellow belt test for example, I had to do 2 throws, then another throw in a self defense situation, then I had to do some positional escapes on the ground. Lastly I had to know some Japanese terms.

    So, competition is not required, but you DO earn points for it, meaning if you wanted to fast track your way up through the ranks, competitions would be a great way to earn the extra points. Otherwise, it just might take a bit longer.
    On the subject of rank, by the way, I've been curious about the average time to Shodan in Judo; I have a friend who's one year younger than me (15, going on 16) who is already a brown belt in the sport. Being that Judo is a pretty well-mandated MA that isn't very prone to McDojoism, I'm forced to assume that this rank is legit (and on the few occasions I've been thrown by him, it's been obvious that he's clearly way beyond the skill of an orange belt). Is this rapid progression common? I have a vague memory of reading the average time to Shodan is about 3 years, but that seemed a little unbelievable at the time.

    /Erik
  5. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    7/17/2013 9:00pm


     Style: Kendo

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Depends on the country, but outside of Japan anywhere from 3 to 10 years for recreational players is common. Where I live, time in grade requirements mean at least 8 years. If you are training in Japan, you can do it in 1 or 2 years. 15 or 16 year old brown belts are common - those kids have usually been training since they were in early grade school and have a lot of competition experience.

    You have to remember that shodan means "beginning rank". It isn't anything special despite the mystique of the "black belt".
  6. Hadzu is online now

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    Posted On:
    7/21/2013 5:19pm


     Style: Shoo Sheetzoo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    Depends on the country, but outside of Japan anywhere from 3 to 10 years for recreational players is common. Where I live, time in grade requirements mean at least 8 years. If you are training in Japan, you can do it in 1 or 2 years. 15 or 16 year old brown belts are common - those kids have usually been training since they were in early grade school and have a lot of competition experience.
    Ah, I see. Thanks for the reply, it seems rank progression can be a little uneven from place to place, then?

    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    You have to remember that shodan means "beginning rank". It isn't anything special despite the mystique of the "black belt".
    BUT IT'S BLACK SO COOL

    ...

    Sorry.
  7. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    7/22/2013 10:49am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Hadzu View Post
    I suppose my big problem is that I'm usually very non-confrontational; unless someone is being really, really douchy I tend to let it slide. I have a lot of social anxieties, so in these types of situations I have trouble taking action, because I'm worried I'll be acting out of line because I misread the situation. I agree that my "record" really is meaningless, and is strictly my (failed) attempt at humoring myself. As stated, regular training won't resume until at least a month from now, so it'll be a while before any of these tips and suggestions make it into practice; still grateful for 'em, though.

    /Erik
    Competition (speaking of Judo) is a good place to learn more about being confrontational, to deal with confrontation and aggression in a more controlled environment. Physiologically, you need to learn how to deal with the infamous "adrenaline dump" that WILL happen if you have to use your ju jitsu skills in self defense...and that won't be a controlled environment with rules.

    In short, competition is more about how to better understand yourself than to win win win (of course, it can be about just winning matches/medals, but even if it is the benefit of dealing with direct physical confrontation is still there).
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  8. Hadzu is online now

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    Posted On:
    9/15/2013 5:12am


     Style: Shoo Sheetzoo

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sorry to necro a rather long-dead, not very interesting thread, but I thought I should give closure to this entire thing once and for all.

    Training has been in full swing after the summer hiatus, and in the 4-5 weeks (8-10 training sessions) that have passed since after the break, I've seen neither head nor tail of good ol' Billy. My feelings on this are mixed; on one hand, it's great that I'll be able to get more high-paced, serious, challenging training; on the other, I feel a little bad that Billy was unable to adjust, and I can't help but wonder if he would eventually have adjusted, made friends in the group and been happy that he stuck with it. Ah well, that's the sort of thing you could turn around in your head for days, gaining nothing but a headache.

    But then, MA isn't for everyone, nothing really is, and for what it's worth (probably very little) I wish him all the best in his future endeavors, and that he finds something that really clicks with him. I'd like to take this time to thank everyone who contributed to this thread; it was constructive, a little crass at times (which I wholly needed), and while I didn't really have to deal with this particular problem, it's helped shape my perception of struggle in martial arts, in general really, and I think I'm better equipped to deal with the situation now, should it arise, than I was before.

    P.L.U

    /Erik
  9. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    9/15/2013 10:15am


     Style: Kendo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The vast majority of people who join martial arts quit. First year attrition in my kendo club is around 90%, and that's not uncommon in any style. Don't worry about those who quit, there are many reasons for them to do so.
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