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  1. chingythingy is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/16/2013 1:37pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    For a tournament game you need to break down your game into component parts. I personally either use mind mapping software or just do it with a bunch of little circles on a scratch paper to start.

    Feet - Offense/Defense - what are your best throws, takedowns, etc? how can you defend the most 5 common throws in tournament BJJ? What stance will you use - regular or southpaw? Do you practice pulling guard in randori if that's one of your strategies?

    Top Game
    I like to think not of individual techniques here, but of pathways. What are your pathways in top game? (Ex: Takedown, knee step-over to half guard, knee cutter pass to side control, lapel free feed under head, knee-on-belly, lapel choke or far side armbar). If you don't have a pathway, then start to figure out what your high percentage pathways are. Hint: you can string a few of your stronger techniques together to form your primary pathways.

    Bottom Game
    What are your pathways here? What type of guard? What guard transitions? (Ex: Guard pull, closed guard, collar sleeve grip, angle off to armbar/triangle/omoplata/reversal)

    Grip Fighting
    What's your grip fighting strategy? Front hand collar grip first, step in follow? Back hand sleeve to front hand collar?

    Rolling Prep Strategy
    What's your strategy for building your game while rolling? (Ex: Primary 3 pathways MWF, TTh new technique plus problem positions).

    As you can see most of this is breaking it down into smaller bite-sized pieces and putting together a plan for improving each piece and getting them to flow together.
  2. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    7/16/2013 1:44pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by blackmonk View Post
    The problem that I had with my last tournament was getting pulled out of my game plan too easily. I am refocusing on playing my basic game against all opponents, but making the small adjustments necessary to keep my go-to techniques high-percentage. An example might be playing more upright against an uchi mata/harai goshi kinda guy, but still going for my over-the-back grips and Russian ties to break him down... As opposed to more of a wrestler, where my back position isn't as important, since his techniques aren't predicated on pulling me forward or onto my toes. I still go for the same grips and throws, though, which is ouchi/kouchi, deashi, and firemans right now. Trying to avoid sacrifice throws for at least 6 months, although they're my bread and butter. Working a lot of harai attempts in there now, along with makikomi stuff.

    I'll also feel out a guy's strength in the first minute or so of a match. If he's moving me a lot, I like to use two sleeve grips and keep him off my collar. It's more tiresome for him, and he also can't pull on my center line with the lapel. If the guy is weaker, I try to break him down as far as possible.

    Deashi harai is a good feeler throw for me, too. I can tell a lot about my opponent's style, strength, and skill level by how he defends (or doesn't defend) the deashi on his lead leg.
    I take it you are talking about Sa/ombo matches and using Judo terminology for the throws?

    To carry on what I wrote to judojeff, basic technique and form is very important as well. Drilling grip/move/throw is good, but if the basic throws suck, then nothing will be as high percentage as you would like (this is obvious, I know...).

    So the two components are the fundamental(s) of the techniques, your posture, movement, gripping, and how you put them all together. What you emphasize depends on evaluating all aspects of your "game", then going back and working over your "weak" points.

    A gauge I use is whether or not a students basic form and execution of a technique (throwing for example...Ouchi Gari) is "correct" or not (really, degree of correctness, not absolute...few are perfect at the level I coach/teach). Static throw, moving throw form is critical. The better the basic form, the more room for error you have in competition to adjust.

    Same with movement and posture...does the student shift his feet around a lot, shuffle, change stances (right to left to neutral) a lot, especially without adjusting the grip? That has to be fixed or the whole grip move throw/ won't work as well or at all. Poor posture/movement leads to opportunities for your opponent to throw/take you down and hinders your own execution of technique.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  3. blackmonk is online now
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    Posted On:
    7/16/2013 8:18pm

    supporting member
     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I play all grappling sports pretty much the same way, although I am more willing to go to guard when competing in BJJ (in response to the sambo/judo terminology part). I compete in judo, sambo, BJJ, sumo, and belt wrestling... Pretty much anything that involves aggressively grabbing other men.

    90% of my training sessions are randori-based, so although I do gross motor movement stuff like uchikomi, I quickly move into more dynamic drilling for majority of the time. I don't learn from doing rote repetition like some people do... I have to spar hours and hours before a technique will work for me.

    Some of my throws suck, but some are good. I throw black belts pretty regularly, for whatever that counts, although I'm giving up my ranks in judo and BJJ because I think the distinctions are too much of a distraction for me. Of course, I have to adhere to rank when I compete, but I'm trying to eliminate it from my vocabulary otherwise.

    I just need a constant reminder to move more assertively, whether that's from a training partner or inner monologue. I'm stuck in this namby-pamby everybody-is-just-hanging-out bullshit from my earlier days of training, as that was the attitude of the gym. "Smooth jazz", as it were. It's not realistic, though, and not conducive to regular success in competition.
  4. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    7/17/2013 11:13am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by blackmonk View Post
    I play all grappling sports pretty much the same way, although I am more willing to go to guard when competing in BJJ (in response to the sambo/judo terminology part). I compete in judo, sambo, BJJ, sumo, and belt wrestling... Pretty much anything that involves aggressively grabbing other men.

    90% of my training sessions are randori-based, so although I do gross motor movement stuff like uchikomi, I quickly move into more dynamic drilling for majority of the time. I don't learn from doing rote repetition like some people do... I have to spar hours and hours before a technique will work for me.

    Some of my throws suck, but some are good. I throw black belts pretty regularly, for whatever that counts, although I'm giving up my ranks in judo and BJJ because I think the distinctions are too much of a distraction for me. Of course, I have to adhere to rank when I compete, but I'm trying to eliminate it from my vocabulary otherwise.

    I just need a constant reminder to move more assertively, whether that's from a training partner or inner monologue. I'm stuck in this namby-pamby everybody-is-just-hanging-out bullshit from my earlier days of training, as that was the attitude of the gym. "Smooth jazz", as it were. It's not realistic, though, and not conducive to regular success in competition.
    I wouldn't usually suggest a lot of "rote" training to anyone, but repetition/drilling of a technique or grip/move/throw (or whatever) sequence in a simpler setting than "randori" has proven helpful in my experience.

    I have for many years in my coaching steered away from a lot of simple uchikomi or "dead" drilling (although you gotta start somewhere). That has developed over the years and I admit I don't have all the answers.

    You have to find what works for you, but we are all human beings so there are some commonalities in learning new skills. If your main problem is the "namby pamby" attitude, then, you have to do what you can to train out of that...which may take a while, as what you learn in your first training comes back when under stress.

    Which is why I started to emphasize less "rote" uchikomi type training and moved to introducing dynamic if simple movement and the grip/move/throw (or move-grip) throw into how I taught Judo. If you learn that at first, despite it not looking "classical" (especially at first, LOL), and your uchikomi are not pretty, so what, under stress, in competition, months/years later, what will be ingrained?

    Dynamic attacks that occur automatically..."aggression" to some....even under duress/stress. My idea was/is that technique will develop over time, and can even be focused upon in a more "rote" fashion if necessary. This has been borne out over the years, however, overall development has always been hindered by a lack of variety of training partners and lack of training time, especially relative to my students primary opponents.

    Anyway, I'm drifting off. Dynamic drilling good, however, consider that your technique can get better by slowing down and concentrating on missing elements or ones that need to be improved.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  5. blackmonk is online now
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    Posted On:
    7/17/2013 1:55pm

    supporting member
     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Haha, do you not like the word "rote"? That wasn't a jab at you, it is simply an observation (not a negative one, either) on every single judo school and coach that I've trained at/with here. Some people learn from it, but I don't.

    Naszir, for example, likes static and compliant repetitions at the beginning of class, and he has a student named Jay that responds phenomenally to it. For me, uchikomi-type repetitions do make my movements slightly more efficient over time, but ultimately do very little for my application during randori, and I am not able to transfer urgency and aggression into my techniques unless I train in a higher-intensity setting 90% of the time. Over the years, static repetition has created a bad habit where I do not pursue a technique with sufficient confidence, especially after I experience resistance from uke.

    I'm only speaking for myself.
  6. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    7/17/2013 4:29pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by blackmonk View Post
    Haha, do you not like the word "rote"? That wasn't a jab at you, it is simply an observation (not a negative one, either) on every single judo school and coach that I've trained at/with here. Some people learn from it, but I don't.

    Naszir, for example, likes static and compliant repetitions at the beginning of class, and he has a student named Jay that responds phenomenally to it. For me, uchikomi-type repetitions do make my movements slightly more efficient over time, but ultimately do very little for my application during randori, and I am not able to transfer urgency and aggression into my techniques unless I train in a higher-intensity setting 90% of the time. Over the years, static repetition has created a bad habit where I do not pursue a technique with sufficient confidence, especially after I experience resistance from uke.

    I'm only speaking for myself.
    I've got no problem with "rote", it's a good description of doing endless uchikomi or repetitions. Learning by rote covers a lot of ground though. As you point out, some people learn well that way (culturally in Japan), others not so well. I've seen the same phenomena regarding different students responding to different training themes.

    Static and compliant as sports specific warmup is OK, but not too much. This tends to work better for higher skill level judoka in my experience. It works for me, but then that is how I originally learned Judo.

    What you do depends ultimately on your own personal needs. I will say that a huge problem with uchikomi (static/compliant) is that they are often done sloppily and incorrectly, and lead as you not to bad habits of one sort or another.

    I think that in general, doing uchikomi correctly is harder than just throwing uke, and that uchikomi are best for higher skill level judoka.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  7. chingythingy is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/18/2013 4:18pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by blackmonk View Post
    90% of my training sessions are randori-based, so although I do gross motor movement stuff like uchikomi, I quickly move into more dynamic drilling for majority of the time. I don't learn from doing rote repetition like some people do... I have to spar hours and hours before a technique will work for me.
    I know what you are talking about w/r to rote repetition. The difference here is standard repetition practice is to repeat a single move or a throw over and over again.

    You are talking about "dynamic drilling". If you mean what I think, then that is the place to spend most of your drilling time. Even randori time limit movements to your pathways and dynamically drill them.

    The problem I see with rote repetition is you get plenty of repetition at the technique, but no repetition at the transitions you see in randori that lead you to the technique. That's the disconnect. So you have to step up from drilling one technique to drilling an entire pathway. The repetition in drilling not only the technique, but an entire common pathway will help condition both the techniques and the transitions.

    Jason Scully posts here - his videos of 100 techniques in 10 min are a good example of training chaining techniques together. In dynamic drilling I would also add in time focusing on the transition movements. Those to me are where I win or lose. I back things up to the transition then run through it a handful of times thinking about the movements and where it might be a more efficient movement.

    I just need a constant reminder to move more assertively, whether that's from a training partner or inner monologue. I'm stuck in this namby-pamby everybody-is-just-hanging-out bullshit from my earlier days of training, as that was the attitude of the gym. "Smooth jazz", as it were. It's not realistic, though, and not conducive to regular success in competition.
    A good competition coach will be all over you about that. That's the best. Without a coach like that you have to piece it together yourself, which is a lot harder. All it takes to get started though is 2 people making a pact though to drill more than everyone else and you're good to go.
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