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  1. lukerawks is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/18/2013 6:27am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Building a tournament game plan

    Good morning, bullies.

    So, with tournament season winding down in the BJJ world, I wanted to see if we could get a discussion going for us newbs regarding building your personal tournament game plan. I've been in several tournaments since starting bjj, but I've never really put pen to paper when it comes to thinking about my game and what I'm going to do. I keep a really detailed training log with descriptions of techniques learned, who I roll with, what I'm tapping to, and where my plateaus/wins are each night. I wanted to see if anyone out there really develops a written game plan, and if so, how do you go about creating it and how religiously do you stick with it?

    Before anyone 'search function, noobs' me, I wanted to see what's happening today with this mindset, and what might be different for you now than it was a few years ago.

    For example, I have a good half guard game right now, but I am a little too comfortable with it, even going as far as pulling someone into half guard before starting out with another type of guard. This is a big habit I'm trying to break on the mats now, as well as fine-tuning my top game to keep the bigger training partners at my gym where they're supposed to be--under me getting subbed. I want to keep working on open and spider guard before my next tournament to give myself a chance to play a more neutral game and to keep myself from giving up an advantage.

    Anyway, just thought it would be an interesting conversation, and I'd love to see how you guys think about this stuff.
  2. judojeff is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/18/2013 1:45pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have never written anything down as far as a plan for what I'm going to do in a given match, mainly because there are just to many factors to consider and I would drive my self insane. I just go in and do my tried and true moves, if those get shut down I branch out from there.

    I don't see much good in a tournament plan because I need to be able to react immediatly to what my opponent is doing and not think "Oh he's breaking grips this is where I can do seoi nage". I do this in practice all the time with moves I am experimenting with and by the time I have finished the thought the opportunity has passed.
  3. jnp is offline
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    Titanium laced beauty

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    Posted On:
    6/29/2013 10:12pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ, wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
  4. billythepunk is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/08/2013 11:56am


     Style: BJJ/Submission Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have actually written down an outline before, it kind of goes like this:

    If the guy is bigger than I am I immediately shoot if I fail I do a sit out, preferably to deep half, immediately start working for a sweep, sweep failure work for kimura to sweep.

    If smaller I play the grip fighting game, and at all cost control hips, because 90% of the time small guy will pull.

    In all cases I am applying preasure to be on top 100% of the time. I will not coast until I am on top and from there I can pick and choose my options for positional advancement.

    I typically find though that after the first scramble you can thow a detailed game plan out the window.

    I have noticed at the higher levels where your opponents are known (there is a finite number if brown and black belt competitors) my coach and his coaches know exactly what they plan to to based on familiarity with other competitors.
  5. blackmonk is offline
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    Welterweight

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    Posted On:
    7/11/2013 9:06pm

    supporting member
     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The more I compete, and the farther I develop in my skillset, the more I realize that strength, conditioning, and aggression are a HUGE part of competition.

    I've always had a problem with my level of aggression not being high enough.
  6. judojeff is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/12/2013 8:48am


     Style: Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by blackmonk View Post
    I've always had a problem with my level of aggression not being high enough.
    This is an issue I have as well, seems that no matter how much I work on always being the aggressor and getting in as many qualified attacks as possible in randori I don't quite bring the same mentality to competitions, I think I need to work on being less concerned with my opponents attacks and focus more on finding my attacks when the match is on the line.
  7. blackmonk is offline
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    Welterweight

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    Posted On:
    7/14/2013 11:11am

    supporting member
     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by judojeff View Post
    This is an issue I have as well, seems that no matter how much I work on always being the aggressor and getting in as many qualified attacks as possible in randori I don't quite bring the same mentality to competitions, I think I need to work on being less concerned with my opponents attacks and focus more on finding my attacks when the match is on the line.
    I don't really know what the formula is for me, and it's frustrating that I can't figure it out. I either win in 30 seconds, or lose a boring points/decision game. Not a whole lot of in between.
  8. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    7/15/2013 2:06pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In higher level competitions where you opponents would (maybe) be known ahead of time, you would have to scout them. This is done all the time in higher level Judo competitions (world championships, Olympics, etc). That would include video taping an analyzing all their matches and developing specific tactics and strategies for each potential opponent.

    Not sure you are quite there yet in BJJ.

    At a less than elite level, you should watch each of your potential opponents matches whether they happen before or after your initial match. This seems obvious, but not everyone does it in my experience. This should be part of your "game plan". You can formulate a "plan" depending on what you see.

    Other than that, being in great shape and strong, as already noted, should be part of your overall plan.
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  9. blackmonk is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/16/2013 9:00am

    supporting member
     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The problem that I had with my last tournament was getting pulled out of my game plan too easily. I am refocusing on playing my basic game against all opponents, but making the small adjustments necessary to keep my go-to techniques high-percentage. An example might be playing more upright against an uchi mata/harai goshi kinda guy, but still going for my over-the-back grips and Russian ties to break him down... As opposed to more of a wrestler, where my back position isn't as important, since his techniques aren't predicated on pulling me forward or onto my toes. I still go for the same grips and throws, though, which is ouchi/kouchi, deashi, and firemans right now. Trying to avoid sacrifice throws for at least 6 months, although they're my bread and butter. Working a lot of harai attempts in there now, along with makikomi stuff.

    I'll also feel out a guy's strength in the first minute or so of a match. If he's moving me a lot, I like to use two sleeve grips and keep him off my collar. It's more tiresome for him, and he also can't pull on my center line with the lapel. If the guy is weaker, I try to break him down as far as possible.

    Deashi harai is a good feeler throw for me, too. I can tell a lot about my opponent's style, strength, and skill level by how he defends (or doesn't defend) the deashi on his lead leg.
  10. BKR is offline
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    7/16/2013 1:03pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by judojeff View Post
    This is an issue I have as well, seems that no matter how much I work on always being the aggressor and getting in as many qualified attacks as possible in randori I don't quite bring the same mentality to competitions, I think I need to work on being less concerned with my opponents attacks and focus more on finding my attacks when the match is on the line.
    Then you need to train that way in the dojo, using that emphasize grip, move, attack (throw), followup to ne waza right away, secure katame waza or attack turtle/pancake. Go at a speed you an be successful, then gradually add speed and resistance (from uke). Start simple and make sure you have success at the end of the drill one way or another, even if you mess up. this will instill the "agression" you may feel you lack. It's not really aggression, necessarily, but how you train that matters.

    You cannot develop positive judo (or anything) by uchikomi and then randori only. Not saying that is all you do ,but it's fairly typical. OK, maybe if you have superb training partners who are only there to train you,but you still have to use progressive drills or resistance in randori to get there.

    Work right vs right/left vs right as well. Develop the simple gripping concepts and patterns associated with them. Focus on simple stuff until you have it down, then go to the next thing.

    This will take you a while, at least a few months, and considering where you are (shiai few and far between), probably longer. To get it all down takes years...and it isn't easy for a lot of folks.

    I was naturally shall we say naturally more "aggressive". I liked to win and kick ass for whatever reason(s), be it football, soccer, judo, or dodge-ball in high school, etc. So to be "forward" in Judo wasn't so hard...I got my ass kicked anyway...
    Falling for Judo since 1980
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