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  1. Rock Ape is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 2:13am

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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Any pain is an indication of a potential injury, it's your body's natural way of telling you to stop doing what's causing the pain. (Go see a doctor)

    Have you experienced the same pain whilst running on a treadmill?

    As a runner I supinate, this means the outer leading edges of my feet touch the ground before the rest do, this is why when you buy a pair of running shoes they need to accommodate the mechanical way your feet ankles and legs function whilst running.

    I have no idea how you run (neutral, pronate or supinate) however, if you have entirely the wrong shoes you'll suffer anything from - nothing at all, to blisters in the same places on both feet, to pain in your ankles, knees and or hips.

    Again, I have no idea what the root cause of the problem you're describing however, if it's happening every time you run (but at no other time) then running is most likely the cause. Get yourself checked out by a doctor to ensure there's no underlying injury, take yourself to a store which has staff who understand about the mechanics of running and let them advise you on the best footwear for you.

    Don't, under any circumstances, run through the pain. There's absolutely no need to do this within recreational running. Start by assessing how your legs are coping with running as an activity by only running a mile at anyone time, do this every day if you're able for about a month. This will set you up into a routine and give you the confidence to know you're not going to be in pain.

    Mild stiffness either the following day, or even on the second day after running is normal, that's just your body telling you, you've worked it within it's capabilities, if it's anything other than mild stiffness then you've pushed yourself outside of your comfort zone. How much stiffness (through to painful muscles) you're prepared to endure is down to you (depends upon how hard you feel you want to eventually train) however, you need to build up your body's conditioning to what is afterall, one of the highest impact activities you can put yourself through.

    The key is; build up steadily.

    Let me know how you get on.
    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

    ~Ella Wheeler
  2. atheistmantis is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 2:42am

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     Style: Tang Soo Don't Retired

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'll do the treadmill RA my hips can't take it. But I can soldier on. No sweat. Can't run but I can walk.
  3. Rock Ape is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 5:54am

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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by atheistmantis View Post
    I'll do the treadmill RA my hips can't take it. But I can soldier on. No sweat. Can't run but I can walk.
    Your next best option is either getting out on a mountain or road bike and pushing distances of around 20 miles, the speed is relatively unimportant when you start.

    Or, go swimming.

    I loath swimming (despite being a mixed gas technical diver) but absolutely love off road mountain biking.

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    My normal week (workload permitting) will involve a mixture of running and getting out at a weekend on my bike. I tend to stay on single or twin tracks of the local rurals where I live and stop off at a cafe about mid point for a coffee and some cake.

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    I then crack on back. Distances normally around 30-40 miles depending upon how much time I have and what else I've got planned for the weekend. You don't have to do epic distance to see the benefits or, buy a fucking mortgage requiring bike, you just have to get out.

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    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

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  4. atheistmantis is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 1:59pm

    supporting member
     Style: Tang Soo Don't Retired

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Got a decent bike. Time to get off my lazy ass and ride. Your snack looks tasty.
  5. Eddie Hardon is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 2:18pm

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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by atheistmantis View Post
    Got a decent bike. Time to get off my lazy ass and ride. Your snack looks tasty.
    You ain't got a bike as effing gorgeous as that....nor have I ;-)
  6. Rock Ape is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 2:57pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Part II

    Following-on from my original post I want to touch on something already partially discussed within the thread - Running shoes.

    In my original post I mentioned the mechanics of running and there are three distinct types of runner.

    1. Those people who are neutral in the way their feet strike the ground.

    2. Those people who are pronate in the way their feet strike the ground. (and severely pronate as illustrated)

    3. Those people who (like me) supinate in the way their feet strike the ground.

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    Why is this information important? The answer to that question will largely depend upon which side of the shoe industry you sit.

    All of the major well known and "high street" running shoe manufacturers will tell you that in order to provide your foot with the correct support needed, the shoe has to suit the mechanical way you naturally run (see above) however; When exactly did we start wearing this form of footwear, did the athletes of Greece compete in their buck-nakedness sporting a pair of Nike Pegasus?

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    The truth (In my humble and reasonably informed opinion) is that we ourselves have created the problem of bio-mechanics and then overly complicated the issue with the way shoe design has developed; somewhat of a vicious circle if you will.

    Talk to companies like Vivobarefoot or Fivefingers and they will argue that you don't need to wear anything on our feet to be able to run comfortably, what we need is the ability to condition our feet and start encouraging our feet and associated anatomy to run naturally. Thus entirely removing the neutral/pronate/supinate issue... Interesting !

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    As a runner wearing what I'll describe as "conventional" running shoes, I'm described as a "supinator" thus am steered toward shoes specifically designed to provide support for that mechanical style of running however, Vivobarefoot say that's a load of old bollocks - OK they didn't say that - I just did, but the sentiment remains the same. I bought a pair of their minimalist shoes (compared to anything else I've worn), they are half the weight of the lightest shoes I already own and you can literally twist them up, simply because there's very little to them in comparison to a conventional shoe.

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    I went for a run knowing that these shoes actively require you to run technically correct IE on the balls of your feet, and limit the amount of heel strike (although thats entirely impossible) to an absolute minimum. This places greater emphsis on your calve muscules to support and propell you - hence why they ache like a ************ if you over do the distance in the barefoot's until you've conditioned up to them.

    Interstingly, if I wear conventional shoes of the "wrong" type, I get blisters and if the distance is long enough pain from the lliotibial band as illustrated, the pain can be fucking serious !

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    When I wear the minimalistic shoes - I suffer nothing, just what they describe as "greater feedback" IE you feel far more of the surface your feet are in contact with.

    So who's fucking kidding who ? Marketing fuckers !!

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    When I first enlisted we wore ankle boots which didn't support the lower calf, I used to get shin splints, later we were issued with "Boots High Leg" I thought.. Fucking great ! Nope, I got shin splints again !! I think it's fair to say that it took quite a while, possibly a couple of years before I was able to force march with weight (what the British Military refer to as Tabbing) without any symptom of pain in the lower legs.

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    What Causes Shin Splints?

    Most runners who are active develop shins splints, will describe an exercise history that includes sudden increases in intensity or duration of impact activities, often along with a lack of appropriate recovery between workouts. There are a variety of factors that can lead to shin splints. The most common cause is repeated trauma to either the muscles or bones of the lower leg.

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    Muscle trauma (exertional compartment syndrome) is often related to overtraining or excessive running on hard surfaces. Repeated use makes the muscles swell and puts pressure on the fascia that covers the muscles in the lower leg leading to pressure and pain.

    Bone trauma to the lower leg can result in stress fractures. Constant pounding the leg bones may cause microscopic cracks and fractures in the tibia and fibula (lower leg bones). Rest is needed to repair these cracks, but without adequate recover, these cracks continue to grow and become a fracture. The result is acute pain and a long recovery.

    Novice runners are at increased risk of shin splints and stress fractures because they are not used to the high impact running has on the muscles and joints of the lower leg and foot. Running on hard surfaces, especially with worn, or innapropriate footware increases stress on the muscles, joints and bones and is another cause of shin splints. Excessive pronation or other biomechanical problems can increase the risk of developing shin splints.

    The Most Common Causes of Shin Splints

    Improper stretching
    Lack of warm-up
    Training too hard
    Increasing mileage too quickly

    Shin splints describes a variety of generalized shin pain that occurs in the front of the lower leg along the shin bone (tibia). The pain of shin splints is typically located on the outer front portion of the lower leg (anterior shin splints) or pain on the back inside of the lower leg (posterior medial) shin splints.

    Shin splints generally occur after cumulative stress causes microtrauma to the soleus muscle at the point of attachment to the shinbone. Repetitive stress can also cause irritation of the posterior tibialis muscle and inflammation of the periosteum, the connective tissue that covers the tibia. Shin splints almost always are the result of overloading these soft tissues through repeated impact activities, without proper conditioning or allowing enough recovery time between workouts.

    Here's a great article in Runners World on the subject of beating shin splints.

    http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/beatin...-them/234.html
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    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

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  7. Neo Sigma is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 3:12pm


     Style: Muay Thai

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    So what do you recommend for idiots who only supinate on one leg and are neutral on the other?
  8. Cake of Doom is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 3:23pm


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    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Neo Sigma View Post
    So what do you recommend for idiots who only supinate on one leg and are neutral on the other?
    Euthanasia?
  9. Rock Ape is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 3:23pm

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    1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neo Sigma View Post
    So what do you recommend for idiots who only supinate on one leg and are neutral on the other?
    Buy the Vivobarefoot option as they will suit any biomechanical style of running, you'll just have to take a bit longer to condition your feet and legs to the minimalist construction of the shoe.

    http://www.vivobarefoot.com/uk/sports.html
    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

    ~Ella Wheeler
  10. Rock Ape is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 3:24pm

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    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cake of Doom View Post
    Euthanasia?
    Don't **** post in here douche.
    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

    ~Ella Wheeler
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