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  1. Corum Irsei is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    26

    Posted On:
    5/08/2013 12:43am


     Style: Taekwondo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    Welcome to Bullshido.

    You are not really confined to your apartment are you? There are a million free or mostly free things you could do outside your apartment to get

    stronger arms and legs.
    Thanks! True, except, it's all urban sprawl and concrete down here so was looking for a low-cost/free alternative that I can do at my place.


    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander View Post
    Do you trust your current instructor?
    Yes and so far, my expectations are gradually being met.


    Quote Originally Posted by DCS View Post
    It depends.

    Broad generalization follows:

    If you want to be a better striker Kickboxing (American Rules) has more compatibility with a TKD-WTF style background than other striking arts like

    Muay Thai.

    If you are after increasing your self defense skills, you need to complement your striking with some art for the clinch-throw-grapple in the ground

    elements. I suggest Judo or its derivatives: BJJ or Sambo.
    How is Kickboxing different from Muay Thai (now I know what MT means)? The visiting/renting instructor teaches BJJ and Muay Thai to my instructors

    during their downtime. I don't know how far they've gone or how competent they are in those areas, but my instructors have been educating us with 2

    wrist locks so far. None yet on the ground, but I was also instructed to go to the 3rd instructor for more advanced and refined training.

    Still a bit confused with "striking" and "ground" terms. Basically striking - focused on hitting while standing and ground - focused on disabling

    opponent when you are both on the floor? Is there any other category? Or does grappling fall under ground as well?



    Quote Originally Posted by legomepanda View Post
    I trained in TKD for a little over 4 years. I loved it and enjoyed every minute of it. I was extremely dedicated, I trained

    outside of class, I got videos on sparring techniques and drilled them in my basement. I felt really comfortable in my fighting ability, and wanted to

    take it to the next level. I found a school that had amatuer and pro fighters, joined, and let the instructor know my intention to compete. The first

    time I sparred one of their fighters I got knocked out. He didn't even mean to. However, while he was training to hit people really hard with his

    fists, I had trained myself to often turn sideways and drop my hands. Not to mention the myriad of other bad habits that I had formed.

    The point I'm making here is that you seem to be really interested in self defense. Despite years of focused training in a martial art I was still a

    terrible fighter, with huge holes in my striking, which was what I was training. If you're taking TKD because it's fun, physical and challenging, good.

    If you want to be able to handle yourself in a fight, you're going to need to fight. Often and with force.

    DCS has some good suggestions. Kickboxing, MT (Muay Thai kickboxing, if you're still wondering) are good for striking. Judo, BJJ, Sambo are all good

    for grappling. I would also suggest Boxing, since that is specifically what TKD lacks.
    By bad habits, was this brought about by bad habits from training outside of class or from your instructor directly? What did your instructor say after

    that?

    Drop hands.. Is this when you are in your TKD fighting/kicking stance? We were told always to keep our guard (hands) up all the time and we would get a

    mild surprise whap on our temple/cheek with the kickpad if our arms were at mid-chest level. Our instructor coached back in the 90s and he didn't

    believe the whole keeping your arms relaxed makes you kick faster or arms doesn't matter because they don't get you points. Also he kept telling us not

    to bounce while we were in that stance. As we have yet to do sparring, I didn't press on with it yet.

    No plans to go toe-to-toe with amateur/pros, but I want to be competent in defending myself (or my sister and girlfriend) in situations like a bar

    fight or when someone "doesn't like the way you look" and starts going at it or, at the very most, when someone wants to flat-out mug you.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    Stretching is part of it, the other part is your leg muscles and kicking dynamics. I recommend kicking at a high target to

    develop high kicks over just static stretching to kick higher.
    So repetitive actual kicking builds leg muscle and power when added to static stretching? Will try it out during my off-days


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    He was concerned that after 8 sessions he should have a new belt by now? HA!
    Not sure why he was in a rush and he'd surely have a hard time finding a dojang that will promote him after 8 sessions.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    I don't see any problem with that.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    It will be useful if you think about training method more than techniques in a vacuum. Do you practice against an opponent

    who's really trying to hit you, and will continue doing so without a ref stepping in whenever there's real contact?


    If self defense is your main focus, are you okay with having it only be 1/4 of what you work on?
    For now, yes. I am satisfied with the 15 mins. I want to make sure my foundation is solid first (get my punches and kicks right, develop power/flexibility, get stances/balance right, etc) before devoting more time to sd, because I feel that it is still connected to sd. No real opponent yet (sparring starts when we get to yellow) but there is a drill where my instructors vary the kickpad positions each time and telling us what kick/leg to use like a pop quiz.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    How did you practice this?

    Are you actually putting on gear and trying to get each other, or are you sitting cross-legged in a circle nodding your head

    that it would probably work? The latter is like learning weight lifting in a lecture hall- you may learn the right things to say and the theory behind

    the art, but you can't apply martial arts with intellectual knowledge alone.
    No gear. And no classroom type sit-down discussion either (only the reason why it is used and when it is used). Really small class and we are only 3 in a class now (2 students + instructor). When we practiced it, the 2 instructors demo'ed it first and then showed it to us. First, we were taught a bit of how to fall properly and I had a bruise on my elbow after mistakingly landing on it (no gear). After that, we were spoonfed step-by-step with the wristlock. Can't write it properly here, but basically opponent grabs you, you hold the wrist or his little finger if you are too slow or have a hard time grasping, and you "bend" (?) the wrist, then bend the elbow, then push him down because he is already in a slanted standing position. Sorry, can't describe this. Anyway, that's one of the things we've been practicing and I still have yet to get it done in a fluid and singular and reflexive motion.

    As for the self-defense form, it's basically the taeguk and the opponent does the mechanical forward stance and punch. In this case, the instructor did a variation, because he said that a. a regular guy will not throw a punch that way, b. a mugger can carry a bat/stick, c. unless you are really quick and precise, a neck chop isn't the most efficient and isn't the fastest way from point A-B. So, basically, same movement but with less formality. Sidestep and grab arm/weapon or keep hand at the side of your head to block it and then use other hand to grab shirt/collar/anything on him for leverage and knee him in the gut or groin. The other way was to kick his shin if the range was lacking. A bit messy compared to the form but the basics were there. Also got a bruise in my right thigh because the instructor showed us how effective our knees can be even with just a light hit (apparently his light hit was more than effective).



    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    I suppose you could, but if your mechanics are good you won't be able to hit with power without hurting yourself (except for

    kicks maybe). A big advantage of kicking shields etc is that you can use them for interactive drilling with a partner- they can move, strike, and

    present the target in a way that a post can't simulate.
    How about those half-body stand up dummies? This is for when I am training alone...


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    Anecdotally, there are plenty of people here who do hard object conditioning and don't have arthritis or other problems.

    There are old karate masters who also claim to not have any dexterity problems. I karate chop at a kettlebell on a chain as part of my training. Of

    course, the plural of anecdotes isn't data.
    Would want more on this, hehe. This is the only thing that is stopping me from doing that kind of conditioning. Btw, does hard object conditioning also equate to more power in the blows or is it different thing because a human being is softer than concrete?

    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    Welcome to Bullshido.

    You are not really confined to your apartment are you? There are a million free or mostly free things you could do outside your apartment to get

    stronger arms and legs.
    Thanks! True, except, it's all urban sprawl and concrete down here so was looking for a low-cost/free alternative that I can do at my place.


    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander View Post
    Do you trust your current instructor?
    Yes and so far, my expectations are gradually being met.


    Quote Originally Posted by DCS View Post
    It depends.

    Broad generalization follows:

    If you want to be a better striker Kickboxing (American Rules) has more compatibility with a TKD-WTF style background than other striking arts like

    Muay Thai.

    If you are after increasing your self defense skills, you need to complement your striking with some art for the clinch-throw-grapple in the ground

    elements. I suggest Judo or its derivatives: BJJ or Sambo.
    How is Kickboxing different from Muay Thai (now I know what MT means)? The visiting/renting instructor teaches BJJ and Muay Thai to my instructors

    during their downtime. I don't know how far they've gone or how competent they are in those areas, but my instructors have been educating us with 2

    wrist locks so far. None yet on the ground, but I was also instructed to go to the 3rd instructor for more advanced and refined training.

    Still a bit confused with "striking" and "ground" terms. Basically striking - focused on hitting while standing and ground - focused on disabling

    opponent when you are both on the floor? Is there any other category? Or does grappling fall under ground as well?



    Quote Originally Posted by legomepanda View Post
    I trained in TKD for a little over 4 years. I loved it and enjoyed every minute of it. I was extremely dedicated, I trained

    outside of class, I got videos on sparring techniques and drilled them in my basement. I felt really comfortable in my fighting ability, and wanted to

    take it to the next level. I found a school that had amatuer and pro fighters, joined, and let the instructor know my intention to compete. The first

    time I sparred one of their fighters I got knocked out. He didn't even mean to. However, while he was training to hit people really hard with his

    fists, I had trained myself to often turn sideways and drop my hands. Not to mention the myriad of other bad habits that I had formed.

    The point I'm making here is that you seem to be really interested in self defense. Despite years of focused training in a martial art I was still a

    terrible fighter, with huge holes in my striking, which was what I was training. If you're taking TKD because it's fun, physical and challenging, good.

    If you want to be able to handle yourself in a fight, you're going to need to fight. Often and with force.

    DCS has some good suggestions. Kickboxing, MT (Muay Thai kickboxing, if you're still wondering) are good for striking. Judo, BJJ, Sambo are all good

    for grappling. I would also suggest Boxing, since that is specifically what TKD lacks.
    By bad habits, was this brought about by bad habits from training outside of class or from your instructor directly? What did your instructor say after

    that?

    Drop hands.. Is this when you are in your TKD fighting/kicking stance? We were told always to keep our guard (hands) up all the time and we would get a

    mild surprise whap on our temple/cheek with the kickpad if our arms were at mid-chest level. Our instructor coached back in the 90s and he didn't

    believe the whole keeping your arms relaxed makes you kick faster or arms doesn't matter because they don't get you points. Also he kept telling us not

    to bounce while we were in that stance. As we have yet to do sparring, I didn't press on with it yet.

    No plans to go toe-to-toe with amateur/pros, but I want to be competent in defending myself (or my sister and girlfriend) in situations like a bar

    fight or when someone "doesn't like the way you look" and starts going at it or, at the very most, when someone wants to flat-out mug you.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    Stretching is part of it, the other part is your leg muscles and kicking dynamics. I recommend kicking at a high target to

    develop high kicks over just static stretching to kick higher.
    So repetitive actual kicking builds leg muscle and power when added to static stretching? Will try it out during my off-days


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    He was concerned that after 8 sessions he should have a new belt by now? HA!
    Not sure why he was in a rush and he'd surely have a hard time finding a dojang that will promote him after 8 sessions.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    I don't see any problem with that.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    It will be useful if you think about training method more than techniques in a vacuum. Do you practice against an opponent

    who's really trying to hit you, and will continue doing so without a ref stepping in whenever there's real contact?


    If self defense is your main focus, are you okay with having it only be 1/4 of what you work on?
    For now, yes. I am satisfied with the 15 mins. I want to make sure my foundation is solid first (get my punches and kicks right, develop power/flexibility, get stances/balance right, etc) before devoting more time to sd, because I feel that it is still connected to sd. No real opponent yet (sparring starts when we get to yellow) but there is a drill where my instructors vary the kickpad positions each time and telling us what kick/leg to use like a pop quiz.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    How did you practice this?

    Are you actually putting on gear and trying to get each other, or are you sitting cross-legged in a circle nodding your head

    that it would probably work? The latter is like learning weight lifting in a lecture hall- you may learn the right things to say and the theory behind

    the art, but you can't apply martial arts with intellectual knowledge alone.
    No gear. And no classroom type sit-down discussion either (only the reason why it is used and when it is used). Really small class and we are only 3 in a class now (2 students + instructor). When we practiced it, the 2 instructors demo'ed it first and then showed it to us. First, we were taught a bit of how to fall properly and I had a bruise on my elbow after mistakingly landing on it (no gear). After that, we were spoonfed step-by-step with the wristlock. Can't write it properly here, but basically opponent grabs you, you hold the wrist or his little finger if you are too slow or have a hard time grasping, and you "bend" (?) the wrist, then bend the elbow, then push him down because he is already in a slanted standing position. Sorry, can't describe this. Anyway, that's one of the things we've been practicing and I still have yet to get it done in a fluid and singular and reflexive motion.

    As for the self-defense form, it's basically the taeguk and the opponent does the mechanical forward stance and punch. In this case, the instructor did a variation, because he said that a. a regular guy will not throw a punch that way, b. a mugger can carry a bat/stick, c. unless you are really quick and precise, a neck chop isn't the most efficient and isn't the fastest way from point A-B. So, basically, same movement but with less formality. Sidestep and grab arm/weapon or keep hand at the side of your head to block it and then use other hand to grab shirt/collar/anything on him for leverage and knee him in the gut or groin. The other way was to kick his shin if the range was lacking. A bit messy compared to the form but the basics were there. Also got a bruise in my right thigh because the instructor showed us how effective our knees can be even with just a light hit (apparently his light hit was more than effective).



    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    I suppose you could, but if your mechanics are good you won't be able to hit with power without hurting yourself (except for

    kicks maybe). A big advantage of kicking shields etc is that you can use them for interactive drilling with a partner- they can move, strike, and

    present the target in a way that a post can't simulate.
    How about those half-body stand up dummies? This is for when I am training alone...


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    Anecdotally, there are plenty of people here who do hard object conditioning and don't have arthritis or other problems.

    There are old karate masters who also claim to not have any dexterity problems. I karate chop at a kettlebell on a chain as part of my training. Of

    course, the plural of anecdotes isn't data.
    Would want more on this, hehe. This is the only thing that is stopping me from doing that kind of conditioning. Btw, does hard object conditioning also equate to more power in the blows or is it a different thing because a human being is softer than concrete?

    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    Welcome to Bullshido.

    You are not really confined to your apartment are you? There are a million free or mostly free things you could do outside your apartment to get

    stronger arms and legs.
    Thanks! True, except, it's all urban sprawl and concrete down here so was looking for a low-cost/free alternative that I can do at my place.


    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander View Post
    Do you trust your current instructor?
    Yes and so far, my expectations are gradually being met.


    Quote Originally Posted by DCS View Post
    It depends.

    Broad generalization follows:

    If you want to be a better striker Kickboxing (American Rules) has more compatibility with a TKD-WTF style background than other striking arts like

    Muay Thai.

    If you are after increasing your self defense skills, you need to complement your striking with some art for the clinch-throw-grapple in the ground

    elements. I suggest Judo or its derivatives: BJJ or Sambo.
    How is Kickboxing different from Muay Thai (now I know what MT means)? The visiting/renting instructor teaches BJJ and Muay Thai to my instructors

    during their downtime. I don't know how far they've gone or how competent they are in those areas, but my instructors have been educating us with 2

    wrist locks so far. None yet on the ground, but I was also instructed to go to the 3rd instructor for more advanced and refined training.

    Still a bit confused with "striking" and "ground" terms. Basically striking - focused on hitting while standing and ground - focused on disabling

    opponent when you are both on the floor? Is there any other category? Or does grappling fall under ground as well?



    Quote Originally Posted by legomepanda View Post
    I trained in TKD for a little over 4 years. I loved it and enjoyed every minute of it. I was extremely dedicated, I trained

    outside of class, I got videos on sparring techniques and drilled them in my basement. I felt really comfortable in my fighting ability, and wanted to

    take it to the next level. I found a school that had amatuer and pro fighters, joined, and let the instructor know my intention to compete. The first

    time I sparred one of their fighters I got knocked out. He didn't even mean to. However, while he was training to hit people really hard with his

    fists, I had trained myself to often turn sideways and drop my hands. Not to mention the myriad of other bad habits that I had formed.

    The point I'm making here is that you seem to be really interested in self defense. Despite years of focused training in a martial art I was still a

    terrible fighter, with huge holes in my striking, which was what I was training. If you're taking TKD because it's fun, physical and challenging, good.

    If you want to be able to handle yourself in a fight, you're going to need to fight. Often and with force.

    DCS has some good suggestions. Kickboxing, MT (Muay Thai kickboxing, if you're still wondering) are good for striking. Judo, BJJ, Sambo are all good

    for grappling. I would also suggest Boxing, since that is specifically what TKD lacks.
    By bad habits, was this brought about by bad habits from training outside of class or from your instructor directly? What did your instructor say after

    that?

    Drop hands.. Is this when you are in your TKD fighting/kicking stance? We were told always to keep our guard (hands) up all the time and we would get a

    mild surprise whap on our temple/cheek with the kickpad if our arms were at mid-chest level. Our instructor coached back in the 90s and he didn't

    believe the whole keeping your arms relaxed makes you kick faster or arms doesn't matter because they don't get you points. Also he kept telling us not

    to bounce while we were in that stance. As we have yet to do sparring, I didn't press on with it yet.

    No plans to go toe-to-toe with amateur/pros, but I want to be competent in defending myself (or my sister and girlfriend) in situations like a bar

    fight or when someone "doesn't like the way you look" and starts going at it or, at the very most, when someone wants to flat-out mug you.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    Stretching is part of it, the other part is your leg muscles and kicking dynamics. I recommend kicking at a high target to

    develop high kicks over just static stretching to kick higher.
    So repetitive actual kicking builds leg muscle and power when added to static stretching? Will try it out during my off-days


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    He was concerned that after 8 sessions he should have a new belt by now? HA!
    Not sure why he was in a rush and he'd surely have a hard time finding a dojang that will promote him after 8 sessions.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    I don't see any problem with that.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    It will be useful if you think about training method more than techniques in a vacuum. Do you practice against an opponent

    who's really trying to hit you, and will continue doing so without a ref stepping in whenever there's real contact?


    If self defense is your main focus, are you okay with having it only be 1/4 of what you work on?
    For now, yes. I am satisfied with the 15 mins. I want to make sure my foundation is solid first (get my punches and kicks right, develop power/flexibility, get stances/balance right, etc) before devoting more time to sd, because I feel that it is still connected to sd. No real opponent yet (sparring starts when we get to yellow) but there is a drill where my instructors vary the kickpad positions each time and telling us what kick/leg to use like a pop quiz.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    How did you practice this?

    Are you actually putting on gear and trying to get each other, or are you sitting cross-legged in a circle nodding your head

    that it would probably work? The latter is like learning weight lifting in a lecture hall- you may learn the right things to say and the theory behind

    the art, but you can't apply martial arts with intellectual knowledge alone.
    No gear. And no classroom type sit-down discussion either (only the reason why it is used and when it is used). Really small class and we are only 3 in a class now (2 students + instructor). When we practiced it, the 2 instructors demo'ed it first and then showed it to us. First, we were taught a bit of how to fall properly and I had a bruise on my elbow after mistakingly landing on it (no gear). After that, we were spoonfed step-by-step with the wristlock. Can't write it properly here, but basically opponent grabs you, you hold the wrist or his little finger if you are too slow or have a hard time grasping, and you "bend" (?) the wrist, then bend the elbow, then push him down because he is already in a slanted standing position. Sorry, can't describe this. Anyway, that's one of the things we've been practicing and I still have yet to get it done in a fluid and singular and reflexive motion.

    As for the self-defense form, it's basically the taeguk and the opponent does the mechanical forward stance and punch. In this case, the instructor did a variation, because he said that a. a regular guy will not throw a punch that way, b. a mugger can carry a bat/stick, c. unless you are really quick and precise, a neck chop isn't the most efficient and isn't the fastest way from point A-B. So, basically, same movement but with less formality. Sidestep and grab arm/weapon or keep hand at the side of your head to block it and then use other hand to grab shirt/collar/anything on him for leverage and knee him in the gut or groin. The other way was to kick his shin if the range was lacking. A bit messy compared to the form but the basics were there. Also got a bruise in my right thigh because the instructor showed us how effective our knees can be even with just a light hit (apparently his light hit was more than effective).



    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    I suppose you could, but if your mechanics are good you won't be able to hit with power without hurting yourself (except for

    kicks maybe). A big advantage of kicking shields etc is that you can use them for interactive drilling with a partner- they can move, strike, and

    present the target in a way that a post can't simulate.
    How about those half-body stand up dummies? This is for when I am training alone...


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    Anecdotally, there are plenty of people here who do hard object conditioning and don't have arthritis or other problems.

    There are old karate masters who also claim to not have any dexterity problems. I karate chop at a kettlebell on a chain as part of my training. Of

    course, the plural of anecdotes isn't data.
    Would want more on this, hehe. This is the only thing that is stopping me from doing that kind of conditioning. Btw, does hard object conditioning also equate to more power in the blows or is it a different thing because a human being is softer than concrete?
  2. Corum Irsei is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    26

    Posted On:
    5/08/2013 3:18am


     Style: Taekwondo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    Welcome to Bullshido.

    You are not really confined to your apartment are you? There are a million free or mostly free things you could do outside your apartment to get stronger arms and legs.
    Thanks! True, except, it's all urban sprawl and concrete down here so was looking for a low-cost/free alternative that I can do at my place.


    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander View Post
    Do you trust your current instructor?
    Yes and so far, my expectations are gradually being met.


    Quote Originally Posted by DCS View Post
    It depends.

    Broad generalization follows:

    If you want to be a better striker Kickboxing (American Rules) has more compatibility with a TKD-WTF style background than other striking arts like Muay Thai.

    If you are after increasing your self defense skills, you need to complement your striking with some art for the clinch-throw-grapple in the ground elements. I suggest Judo or its derivatives: BJJ or Sambo.
    How is Kickboxing different from Muay Thai (now I know what MT means)? The visiting/renting instructor teaches BJJ and Muay Thai to my instructors during their downtime. I don't know how far they've gone or how competent they are in those areas, but my instructors have been educating us with 2 wrist locks so far. None yet on the ground, but I was also instructed to go to the 3rd instructor for more advanced and refined training.

    Still a bit confused with "striking" and "ground" terms. Basically striking - focused on hitting while standing and ground - focused on disabling opponent when you are both on the floor? Is there any other category? Or does grappling fall under ground as well?



    Quote Originally Posted by legomepanda View Post
    I trained in TKD for a little over 4 years. I loved it and enjoyed every minute of it. I was extremely dedicated, I trained outside of class, I got videos on sparring techniques and drilled them in my basement. I felt really comfortable in my fighting ability, and wanted to take it to the next level. I found a school that had amatuer and pro fighters, joined, and let the instructor know my intention to compete. The first time I sparred one of their fighters I got knocked out. He didn't even mean to. However, while he was training to hit people really hard with his fists, I had trained myself to often turn sideways and drop my hands. Not to mention the myriad of other bad habits that I had formed.

    The point I'm making here is that you seem to be really interested in self defense. Despite years of focused training in a martial art I was still a terrible fighter, with huge holes in my striking, which was what I was training. If you're taking TKD because it's fun, physical and challenging, good. If you want to be able to handle yourself in a fight, you're going to need to fight. Often and with force.

    DCS has some good suggestions. Kickboxing, MT (Muay Thai kickboxing, if you're still wondering) are good for striking. Judo, BJJ, Sambo are all good for grappling. I would also suggest Boxing, since that is specifically what TKD lacks.
    By bad habits, was this brought about by bad habits from training outside of class or from your instructor directly? What did your instructor say after that?

    Drop hands.. Is this when you are in your TKD fighting/kicking stance? We were told always to keep our guard (hands) up all the time and we would get a mild surprise whap on our temple/cheek with the kickpad if our arms were at mid-chest level. Our instructor coached back in the 90s and he didn't believe the whole keeping your arms relaxed makes you kick faster or arms doesn't matter because they don't get you points. Also he kept telling us not to bounce while we were in that stance. As we have yet to do sparring, I didn't press on with it yet.

    No plans to go toe-to-toe with amateur/pros, but I want to be competent in defending myself (or my sister and girlfriend) in situations like a bar fight or when someone "doesn't like the way you look" and starts going at it or, at the very most, when someone wants to flat-out mug you.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    Stretching is part of it, the other part is your leg muscles and kicking dynamics. I recommend kicking at a high target to develop high kicks over just static stretching to kick higher.
    So repetitive actual kicking builds leg muscle and power when added to static stretching? Will try it out during my off-days


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    He was concerned that after 8 sessions he should have a new belt by now? HA!
    Not sure why he was in a rush and he'd surely have a hard time finding a dojang that will promote him after 8 sessions.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    I don't see any problem with that.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    It will be useful if you think about training method more than techniques in a vacuum. Do you practice against an opponent who's really trying to hit you, and will continue doing so without a ref stepping in whenever there's real contact?


    If self defense is your main focus, are you okay with having it only be 1/4 of what you work on?
    For now, yes. I am satisfied with the 15 mins. I want to make sure my foundation is solid first (get my punches and kicks right, develop power/flexibility, get stances/balance right, etc) before devoting more time to sd, because I feel that it is still connected to sd. No real opponent yet (sparring starts when we get to yellow) but there is a drill where my instructors vary the kickpad positions each time and telling us what kick/leg to use like a pop quiz.


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    How did you practice this?

    Are you actually putting on gear and trying to get each other, or are you sitting cross-legged in a circle nodding your head that it would probably work? The latter is like learning weight lifting in a lecture hall- you may learn the right things to say and the theory behind the art, but you can't apply martial arts with intellectual knowledge alone.
    No gear. And no classroom type sit-down discussion either (only the reason why it is used and when it is used). Really small class and we are only 3 in a class now (2 students + instructor). When we practiced it, the 2 instructors demo'ed it first and then showed it to us. First, we were taught a bit of how to fall properly and I had a bruise on my elbow after mistakingly landing on it (no gear). After that, we were spoonfed step-by-step with the wristlock. Can't write it properly here, but basically opponent grabs you, you hold the wrist or his little finger if you are too slow or have a hard time grasping, and you "bend" (?) the wrist, then bend the elbow, then push him down because he is already in a slanted standing position. Sorry, can't describe this. Anyway, that's one of the things we've been practicing and I still have yet to get it done in a fluid and singular and reflexive motion.

    As for the self-defense form, it's basically the taeguk and the opponent does the mechanical forward stance and punch. In this case, the instructor did a variation, because he said that a. a regular guy will not throw a punch that way, b. a mugger can carry a bat/stick, c. unless you are really quick and precise, a neck chop isn't the most efficient and isn't the fastest way from point A-B. So, basically, same movement but with less formality. Sidestep and grab arm/weapon or keep hand at the side of your head to block it and then use other hand to grab shirt/collar/anything on him for leverage and knee him in the gut or groin. The other way was to kick his shin if the range was lacking. A bit messy compared to the form but the basics were there. Also got a bruise in my right thigh because the instructor showed us how effective our knees can be even with just a light hit (apparently his light hit was more than effective).



    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    I suppose you could, but if your mechanics are good you won't be able to hit with power without hurting yourself (except for kicks maybe). A big advantage of kicking shields etc is that you can use them for interactive drilling with a partner- they can move, strike, and present the target in a way that a post can't simulate.
    How about those half-body stand up dummies? This is for when I am training alone...


    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    Anecdotally, there are plenty of people here who do hard object conditioning and don't have arthritis or other problems. There are old karate masters who also claim to not have any dexterity problems. I karate chop at a kettlebell on a chain as part of my training. Of course, the plural of anecdotes isn't data.
    Would want more on this, hehe. This is the only thing that is stopping me from doing that kind of conditioning. Btw, does hard object conditioning also equate to more power in the blows or is it a different thing because a human being is softer than concrete?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    Yes and so far, my expectations are gradually being met.
    Then shut the **** up and stop asking people who have no idea how your instructor teaches or even what he teaches.

    Stop posting.

    You need to be asking these questions to the person who is training you, the person you trust, not anonymous Interweb authorities.

    Until you start posting videos of your training, every response that everyone on this thread has made to you is either so generalized as to be useless or is complete bullshit.

    You are relatively new to the martial arts. You need to be training the absolute basics with an instructor you trust, not asking us bullshit questions.
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    Posted On:
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I apologize if I'm coming on rather strong, Bullshido tends to be NHB as far as discussion.

    Do you understand why you should be asking your instructor these questions first?
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    Posted On:
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    I perfectly understand where you are coming from and no offense was taken. Don't worry, I've asked most of these to my instructor and brought up my expectations and concerns as well. Just applied that "you can't learn everything from school" mentality here. I am aware of the dangers and what you are getting at and how it can distract and detract me from actually learning something. Guess the closest analogy I could come up with is self-diagnosing via the internet instead of going to an actual doctor. Was just hoping to pick up a few helpful techniques to supplement what my instructor is teaching, since I'm assuming most here are proficient in their craft. Also, with the advent of interest-based internet communities, I felt that it would be beneficial to my martial arts growth to join like-minded individuals online.

    So, yes, I'll concentrate more on the actual and if I have any questions still, I will run them through my instructor first. Since we are on the subject, will books be a help or a hindrance?
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    Posted On:
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    I perfectly understand where you are coming from and no offense was taken. Don't worry, I've asked most of these to my instructor and brought up my expectations and concerns as well. Just applied that "you can't learn everything from school" mentality here. I am aware of the dangers and what you are getting at and how it can distract and detract me from actually learning something. Guess the closest analogy I could come up with is self-diagnosing via the internet instead of going to an actual doctor. Was just hoping to pick up a few helpful techniques to supplement what my instructor is teaching, since I'm assuming most here are proficient in their craft. Also, with the advent of interest-based internet communities, I felt that it would be beneficial to my martial arts growth to join like-minded individuals online.

    So, yes, I'll concentrate more on the actual and if I have any questions still, I will run them through my instructor first. Since we are on the subject, will books be a help or a hindrance?
    Unless you are highly trained in a given art, you won't pick up much from books, and even then, only in systems similar to what you do. For example, after years of TKD, you might be able to pick up some ideas on kicking from looking at a Kyokushin book. However, you won't learn anything of worth from a jujutsu book.

    Decide what it is you want out of your training in your current school. Decide what is lacking. Find a school that fills those gaps, and immerse yourself in that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    Was just hoping to pick up a few helpful techniques to supplement what my instructor is teaching, since I'm assuming most here are proficient in their craft.
    1) You won't pick up any helpful techniques from a forum. At all.

    2) Most people here are no more proficient at their craft than you are. Many are probably worse. Unless you see someone with a fight record tag or an instructor tag, don't assume that they are better than you.
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    Posted On:
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    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander View Post
    Unless you are highly trained in a given art, you won't pick up much from books, and even then, only in systems similar to what you do. For example, after years of TKD, you might be able to pick up some ideas on kicking from looking at a Kyokushin book. However, you won't learn anything of worth from a jujutsu book.
    How about books that touch on the art itself? We were given a pamphlet which was basically an intro/primer to TKD. Didn't feel sated and wanted to read more. Was looking at "Vital Point Strikes" and "Taekwondo Self-defense: Taekwondo Hoshinsool" by Sang H. Kim. Would want to go deeper theoretically (history, traditional and contemporary style differences, similarities to other arts, Japanese influence, self-defense origins, etc).


    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander View Post
    Decide what it is you want out of your training in your current school. Decide what is lacking. Find a school that fills those gaps, and immerse yourself in that.
    I did and am in this for the long haul. Self-defense and being a competent fighter that can effectively utilize his body (as opposed to the average joe) may sound like shallow reasons, but they should develop into something more substantial as I progress with my training. The instructor(s) are living up to my expectations and are not overselling themselves. Fortunately, my instructor also answered the 2nd part, so I will continue with the brief BJJ intro moves and then take up the visiting instructor's offer for the full once-a-week session when my schedule is willing. So, in any case, I will still be sticking to this school. TKD for striking and semi-regular BJJ training for "ground" should be enough for me for now.

    By the way, when you mean school, is it the "school of thought"/art or the place/institution where you train?


    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander View Post
    1) You won't pick up any helpful techniques from a forum. At all.

    2) Most people here are no more proficient at their craft than you are. Many are probably worse. Unless you see someone with a fight record tag or an instructor tag, don't assume that they are better than you.
    If you don't mind my asking, what is the usual/general discussion for martial arts forums and what are the helpful things you can get, if not techniques? And what are the ideas usually exchanged, especially since everyone is of varying disciplines?
    Last edited by Corum Irsei; 5/09/2013 12:47pm at .
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    Posted On:
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    How about books that touch on the art itself? We were given a pamphlet which was basically an intro/primer to TKD. Didn't feel sated and wanted to read more. Was looking at "Vital Point Strikes" and "Taekwondo Self-defense: Taekwondo Hoshinsool" by Sang H. Kim. Would want to go deeper theoretically (history, traditional and contemporary style differences, similarities to other arts, Japanese influence, self-defense origins, etc).
    If you're looking for good self-defense, you won't find it in these books. I love TKD, but that stuff is going to get you killed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    By the way, when you mean school, is it the "school of thought"/art or the place/institution where you train?
    All of that is fun and good, but the most important school is your individual school where you are receiving training.

    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    If you don't mind my asking, what is the usual/general discussion for martial arts forums and what are the helpful things you can get, if not techniques? And what are the ideas usually exchanged, especially since everyone is of varying disciplines?
    Comraderie, debates, and pictures of hot chicks, mostly.
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    Posted On:
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    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander View Post
    If you're looking for good self-defense, you won't find it in these books.
    So again it boils down to actual training, right? Wasn't able to find the right word earlier, but I was looking for the philosophy of TKD (if there is any, considering it's an amalgamation of schools).

    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander View Post
    I love TKD, but that stuff is going to get you killed.
    By stuff, is it books or TKD itself? Books, I understand, because a little knowledge is a dangerous thing (the same with unsupervised knowledge).

    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander View Post
    Comraderie, debates, and pictures of hot chicks, mostly.
    Hot chicks that are into martial arts?
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    Posted On:
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    So again it boils down to actual training, right? Wasn't able to find the right word earlier, but I was looking for the philosophy of TKD (if there is any, considering it's an amalgamation of schools).
    You can read about the philosophy of an art like TKD, certainly, but even that will only be best understood through years of constant practice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    By stuff, is it books or TKD itself? Books, I understand, because a little knowledge is a dangerous thing (the same with unsupervised knowledge).
    The standard TKD hoshinsul curriculum, and that seen in the Turtle Press books, is not what I would recommend for self-defense. I have the Turtle Press book. Some of it is decent, some of it is questionable, but none of it is alive. Without an alive delivery system, you won't develop the ability to pull off any of those techniques.

    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    Hot chicks that are into martial arts?
    Is there any other reason to do Taekwondo?
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