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  1. Corum Irsei is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/17/2013 2:43pm


     Style: Taekwondo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    New to the website...

    Hi all! Quick background: 32 years old. Studied Taekwondo all throughout my elementary school years up until mid secondary school. Red belt. Stopped. Then came college, part-time job, and real job. Anyway, since I am more or less acquainted with my schedule, I decided to get reacquainted with martial arts. Of course, I gravitated to this particular one. Loved it back then and it still works well with my physique. Found a dojang and signed up for a twice-a-week evening class with the senior instructor. We are 3 in a class and the others are in their late 20s. I requested to start back to square one because, having a different mindset from when I was a kid, I want to start out properly (i.e. fine-tune the technique). The groundwork may be there and the pickup will of course be easier due to recall, but I'm not treating it as a adrenaline outlet anymore. Also, I will only be cheating myself if I took the easy route.

    Anyway, here's my reason for visiting the forum: how can I be more efficient? Any tips on and off the dojang? Since it is only twice a week, I feel that I need to also do some research and training during my off-days. However, I only can do it in the confines of my apartment because a gym is out of the question and I do not have time to take up another discipline.

    Also, this is a vague question, but how can I make Taekwondo into something more practical? I am not starting a debate on whether this is good for self-defense, but what I want is for the things I learn to become "muscle memory" and possibly be of use in certain situations.

    Finally, what exercises can I do to inject more power into my kicks and punches? Sorry, it should be commonsense, but back then, I never did any extra-curricular training apart from those tri-weekly classes.
  2. Permalost is online now
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    4/17/2013 2:50pm

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     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Welcome to Bullshido
    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    Of course, I gravitated to this particular one. Loved it back then and it still works well with my physique.
    What's your physique?
    how can I be more efficient? Any tips on and off the dojang? Since it is only twice a week, I feel that I need to also do some research and training during my off-days. However, I only can do it in the confines of my apartment because a gym is out of the question and I do not have time to take up another discipline.
    Efficient in what way? What are your goals in TKD?

    Also, this is a vague question, but how can I make Taekwondo into something more practical? I am not starting a debate on whether this is good for self-defense, but what I want is for the things I learn to become "muscle memory" and possibly be of use in certain situations.
    Once you're comfortable sparring TKD, maybe try sparring people from other backgrounds.

    Finally, what exercises can I do to inject more power into my kicks and punches? Sorry, it should be commonsense, but back then, I never did any extra-curricular training apart from those tri-weekly classes.
    A heavy bag or wavemaster would be ideal, but in an apartment you might have some trouble.
  3. franginho is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/17/2013 3:00pm


     Style: JiuJistu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hello Corum Irsei,
    welcome to the forum.

    Responding your questions...
    1) How to make TKD somewhat more applicable: There are a few ways, first try to use the technique but be aware of the set up/rule set they are taught in. For instance in WTF TKD and as far as i know in ITF as well, there are no punches to the head(in sparring), and sparring is point oriented. Keep that in mind, it works like this in the dojo but not if you want to apply it "for real".
    Same goes for Ilbo-terion and if you do it sanbo-terion (please excuse my spelling, I have no clue of how to phonetically translate that into english and I haven't trained anything regarding stand up in years), the scenario is reduced, one/two attacks that are in line and telegraphed - little to no direct aplication.
    There are no low kicks practiced in most schools/kwans.

    How to fix all this? Spar under a MMA/MT/Sanda/Kickboxing rule set, this will give you an idea of how to apply what you have learned in a more "real" setting.
    Cross train if you can/want.


    2) As for how to improve your speed/strength, the most obvious one is - Start lifting!

    There is another way that I used when I didn't have access to a gym that was self resistance training (results were so so and views on this are, I guess, critical). It works like this. You do the move you are doing, lets say a punch and you flex the contrary muscle (biceps - triceps) while doing the move, hindering yourself from doing the move, this is done rather slow and with lots of focus... as I said, most likely not your best option but helps focusing and understanding your body and the technique.


    Hope that helps somewhat.
  4. Permalost is online now
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    4/17/2013 3:05pm

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     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

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    Quote Originally Posted by franginho View Post
    There is another way that I used when I didn't have access to a gym that was self resistance training (results were so so and views on this are, I guess, critical). It works like this. You do the move you are doing, lets say a punch and you flex the contrary muscle (biceps - triceps) while doing the move, hindering yourself from doing the move, this is done rather slow and with lots of focus... as I said, most likely not your best option but helps focusing and understanding your body and the technique.
    I'd recommend bodyweight calisthenics over this^ for developing speed/strength without a gym.
  5. franginho is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/17/2013 3:06pm


     Style: JiuJistu

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What he said... Body Weight/ Polymetrics!
    Well my brain goes into stupid mode when I think back about then...
  6. Corum Irsei is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/17/2013 3:12pm


     Style: Taekwondo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    Welcome to Bullshido
    Thanks!

    What's your physique?
    Swimmer's build and long legs. Also did soccer and biking.

    Efficient in what way? What are your goals in TKD?
    Can't give a concrete example now, but maybe effective in the sense that I will be able to defend myself more competently against say a drunken lout in a bar (as opposed to just haphazard fisticuffs) or be able to react with more fluidity or finesse in a potentially dangerous situation. Goals? Am planning to be here for the long-haul. Not in a rush to go black belt and want to be comfortable with the arsenals, etc in each level before I advance. Also not interested in competition-type taekwondo, which I also relayed to my instructor. No plans of competing anyway.

    Once you're comfortable sparring TKD, maybe try sparring people from other backgrounds.
    Will try in the distant future. Never had a problem sparring as a kid against another kid, but it will be different now. I will most likely be maimed by my opponent at this point in time. Will focus on improving myself first. Good idea though. However, none of my friends or coworkers have any combat training and I don't exactly know how to ask someone to spar with me without coming off as a braggart.

    A heavy bag or wavemaster would be ideal, but in an apartment you might have some trouble.
    Will shadow punching help or do I need something solid to hit, for example? No place to hang a bag.
  7. Corum Irsei is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/17/2013 3:20pm


     Style: Taekwondo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Permalost View Post
    I'd recommend bodyweight calisthenics over this^ for developing speed/strength without a gym.
    Quote Originally Posted by franginho
    What he said... Body Weight/ Polymetrics!
    Well my brain goes into stupid mode when I think back about then.
    Are calisthenics and polymetrics interchangeable?

    Any good body weight workout plans to recommend or those geared to improving striking power?
  8. Permalost is online now
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    4/17/2013 3:25pm

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     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corum Irsei View Post
    Can't give a concrete example now, but maybe effective in the sense that I will be able to defend myself more competently against say a drunken lout in a bar (as opposed to just haphazard fisticuffs) or be able to react with more fluidity or finesse in a potentially dangerous situation.
    A drunken lout is actually a fairly low bar- they're most often beaten by people with no training at all, as they are also untrained people but even less adept due to intoxication. I mention this because I've seen people say that their training is so great because its worked in The Streets, and its worth noting that this isn't the best indicator of good technique or whatever.

    Goals? Am planning to be here for the long-haul. Not in a rush to go black belt and want to be comfortable with the arsenals, etc in each level before I advance. Also not interested in competition-type taekwondo, which I also relayed to my instructor. No plans of competing anyway.
    Few people get into martial arts for competition, but just keep in mind that your attitude may change as you get better. Competition will give you a chance to go up against people who actually know the same stuff as you.


    Will try in the distant future. Never had a problem sparring as a kid against another kid, but it will be different now. I will most likely be maimed by my opponent at this point in time. Will focus on improving myself first. Good idea though. However, none of my friends or coworkers have any combat training and I don't exactly know how to ask someone to spar with me without coming off as a braggart.
    Maybe poke around Craigslist or the Throwdown forum to see if other martial artists are out there. I trained with a judo guy in the park that I met through Bullshido, and we trained/sparred weekly for like 2 years.


    Will shadow punching help or do I need something solid to hit, for example? No place to hang a bag.
    I'd say shadowboxing is useful but only if you've learned how to do it properly. Not sure if your TKD coach teaches this. Does your dojang have heavy bags? Or some kicking shields?
  9. Corum Irsei is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/02/2013 3:11am


     Style: Taekwondo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    After 9 sessions, I can finally give a more concrete update. Despite being a former red, I found it very refreshing to start from square one. Most of the motions were familiar, but at least I was corrected (either I had forgotten or just breezed through it in the past or was doing it wrong) on each and every stance and block. The poomse and self-defense forms are now not just "going-through-the-motion" activities for me (yup, I just enjoyed the kicking and sparring parts when I was a kid) and hopefully with practice, the movements would become instinctual. My kicks are still crappy, since age robbed me of my flexibility, but I was assured that with the proper stretches (on-and-off the dojang), I'd get my form back. We are now only two in a class, as the third student felt the training routine was too slow and kept saying that after more than 8 sessions, we should already be preparing for yellow.

    Anyway, I have a few questions and want to share a bit of interesting oddities I've noticed in the class.

    First, is it ok to have 2 instructors? Not at the same time, but I noticed our instructors usually alternate every 2 sessions. Nothing much is different save for 2 slight things: one is more focused on hand techniques (blocks, punches, and hip-relation to the punches when throwing them) and the other is more on kicks and forms... also, one tends to breakdown the techniques into 3 movements, whereas the other does it in 2, then makes it into 1.

    Second, is WTF okay in a practical setting? I asked the type of TKD they were teaching and I was told that it was WTF. After doing some internet browsing, I've noticed that the majority swear by ITF and only say that WTF is for the Olympics. Is the difference in style that great?

    Third, I brought up the self-defense issue with my instructors and was surprised when they alloted the last quarter of the session to teaching me simple techniques that I didn't know Taekwondo had. I was told not to use it for sparring, but, for example... one self-defense form involved holding the attacker's hand and chopping the neck. We were taught that we could also grab a different area and knee them in the gut or hit them in the shin. Last week, we were introduced to a wrist lock and twist (?) move for when an assailant puts his arm around you feigning friendship but just wants to keep you from running away. These two for now until we get them right, though. Also the other instructor taught us how to hold a bag or laptop so that we could use it as a weapon when our hands are encumbered. So my question is, is it perfectly normal for schools to teach unorthodox stuff (I didn't even know TKD had wrist attacks) or stuff outside the curriculum?

    Finally, to answer Permalost's question, yup, there is a kicking shield and a kicking pad. No punching bag though. I was told, however, that I could practice my blocks and punches on a wooden post if I had no partner to work with. Now, my question is.. What is the verdict on Wolff's Law here? I am not sure which to believe and I am quite paranoid with my hands since I am a dental hygienist and the last thing I need is arthritis.

    Thanks!
  10. jedtex88 is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/02/2013 3:48am


     Style: Jhoon Rhee Tae-Kwon-Do

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    OP Have you seen either of you instructors spar yet? Do they allow "free sparring" or is it all point based?
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